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Try checking with Clemster or E39Source if you haven't already. Or you can rebuild your existing calipers. I think Zeckhausen Racing has new pistons if your old ones are too corroded to re-use.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Try checking with Clemster or E39Source if you haven't already. Or you can rebuild your existing calipers. I think Zeckhausen Racing has new pistons if your old ones are too corroded to re-use.
I really only need the front right caliper right now. I know they can be rebuilt but my mechanic doesn’t want to do it. I found a reman’d one on Turner for $362 😬 I don’t know if I should buy it or just look for another shop who will rebuild it. Figure a shop will probably try to get me for at least 2 hours labor just to rebuild it and another hour to uninstall/install it
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I know I can save a lot Of money if I do it myself. I feel like rebuilding the calipers is the most sensible solution being that they’re discontinued, and all the parts to rebuild are available including the piston. I have no knowledge of how to work on brakes as far as removing the lines+caliper and re bleeding. I feel like I could rebuild the caliper myself if it were in my hands. I just don’t feel comfortable uninstalling, re assembling and bleeding by myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Disregard! I just ordered all the parts to rebuild them, I’m going to tackle this one myself following the caliper rebuild thread. StephenVA expect a few PMs from me in the near future 😜 I’m about to get on my noob YouTube mechanic bs! It’s all about learning and doing what you like so **** it. This board is so helpful and makes you realize not many professional mechanic shops out there have anywhere near as much knowledge as all of you guys have here when it comes to the E39 M5
 

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Bleeding part is just PITA :)

But refurbishing calipers is not bad task at all! Just check from Youtube couple videos, get the tools and parts, and you are ready to go!
I just done my spare calipers in last winter, first time ever, and final result was pretty nice :)
But bleeding was done in Schmiedmann. It is also quite straight forward task if doing it with someone who has even a bit understanding how it should work.
 

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Disregard! I just ordered all the parts to rebuild them, I’m going to tackle this one myself following the caliper rebuild thread. StephenVA expect a few PMs from me in the near future I’m about to get on my noob YouTube mechanic bs! It’s all about learning and doing what you like so **** it. This board is so helpful and makes you realize not many professional mechanic shops out there have anywhere near as much knowledge as all of you guys have here when it comes to the E39 M5
Rosie’s brake overhaul tip #1.

If you keep the brake fluid reservoir full of brake fluid then you won’t get air in the master cylinder and DSC unit and bleeding will be a breeze.
I achieve this by:-
1) Filling the reservoir to the brim and then capping it with a piece of rubber glove and an elastic band to hold the fluid in there by vacuum.
And:-
2) Capping/sealing the brake hoses once the Calipers are off them.
The bleed nipple rubber caps usually work well for this, but on an E39 they might be a little small.
If you don’t have anything else, then pieces of rubber gloves and elastic bands will work as well.

Tip #2
There is no such thing as too clean :)
A caustic solution cleans brake components really well.
Dishwasher powder and boiling water works nicely - rinse in plain boiling water and then cover in brake fluid to stop surface rust in the bore.

Tip #3
Make sure the seal groove is nice and clean with no build up in there.
A 90° pick is a useful tool to make sure there’s nothing in corners in the bottom of the groove.
Make sure the new seal is properly seated square in the groove - as already stated - use brake fluid to lube it and then push it in with your fingers and run them around it with pressure to make sure it’s down all the way.
The top edge of the seal should be flush with the housing, the bottom edge protrudes slightly - this is what seals the piston.

Take your time and enjoy the satisfaction of the job. :)
 

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You can use vacuum caps to cap the lines once the caliper is removed. That's what I used when I rebuilt the calipers on my E46 and they worked perfectly. Get a variety pack so you have multiple sizes. Your local auto parts store should have them.

 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am going to be rebuilding the 2 front calipers only and replacing front rotors and pads. This will be my first DIY on brakes period. I’ve ordered all parts would any one care to add all the tools I will need for this job to remove the caliper and rebuild it. (Bolt types/socket sizes ect. Can’t seem to find a solid tutorial video on how to uninstall the front calipers on the e39 m5
 

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I am going to be rebuilding the 2 front calipers only and replacing front rotors and pads. This will be my first DIY on brakes period. I’ve ordered all parts would any one care to add all the tools I will need for this job to remove the caliper and rebuild it. (Bolt types/socket sizes ect. Can’t seem to find a solid tutorial video on how to uninstall the front calipers on the e39 m5
Large screwdriver
7mm Allen wrench for caliper pins
18mm socket/breaker bar for carrier
14mm spanner for brake hose
9mm spanner for bleed nipple
5mm Allen wrench for disc retaining screws


Instructions and torque specs:-


 

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To prevent the brake fluid from leaking when disconnecting the caliper from the lines, apply and hold partial pressure to the brake pedal prior to removal. The workshop manual states "Apply pedal support and press brake pedal slightly. This prevents brake fluid from emerging from the expansion tank and air from entering the brake system after the brake lines have been detached."

The BMW workshop manual is linked below.

 

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Discussion Starter #14
To prevent the brake fluid from leaking when disconnecting the caliper from the lines, apply and hold partial pressure to the brake pedal prior to removal. The workshop manual states "Apply pedal support and press brake pedal slightly. This prevents brake fluid from emerging from the expansion tank and air from entering the brake system after the brake lines have been detached."

The BMW workshop manual is linked below.

I’m glad you mentioned this because this is one of my main concerns when removing calipers I don’t want to overflow at the MC reservoir or introduce air into the lines. Being that I’m only doing the fronts do I still need to bleed all around?
 

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To prevent the brake fluid from leaking when disconnecting the caliper from the lines, apply and hold partial pressure to the brake pedal prior to removal. The workshop manual states "Apply pedal support and press brake pedal slightly. This prevents brake fluid from emerging from the expansion tank and air from entering the brake system after the brake lines have been detached."

The BMW workshop manual is linked below.

Of course they would have a special tool for that... :rolleyes:
 

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Apply pedal support and press brake pedal slightly. This prevents brake fluid from emerging from the expansion tank and air from entering the system when the brake lines are opened.

any stick of wood with a cloth to protect the seats will do the job. Read the TIS service manuals as they explain the processes in detail for any repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
This is why I want to do it myself. I feel like a shop won’t do all these proper steps. Can I just pinch the lines instead? I ordered new hoses too
 

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This is why I want to do it myself. I feel like a shop won’t do all these proper steps. Can I just pinch the lines instead? I ordered new hoses too
If you ordered new hoses, you'll be left with just the hard line after you remove the hose, which can't be pinched. You could try putting something over the end to seal it, but then when it's time to install everything, you'll be rushing to try and get it all back together while brake fluid is leaking and making a mess.

The method the service manual recommends is the simplest solution (in my opinion) and it works. Just apply pressure to the pedal with a block of wood or something and then move the seat forward in order to hold the object in place. I used this method about a year ago when I replaced all of my flexible brake lines while installing new pads and rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If you ordered new hoses, you'll be left with just the hard line after you remove the hose, which can't be pinched. You could try putting something over the end to seal it, but then when it's time to install everything, you'll be rushing to try and get it all back together while brake fluid is leaking and making a mess.

The method the service manual recommends is the simplest solution (in my opinion) and it works. Just apply pressure to the pedal with a block of wood or something and then move the seat forward in order to hold the object in place. I used this method about a year ago when I replaced all of my flexible brake lines while installing new pads and rotors.
Ahhh clever description from a pro to a noob thanks a lot! I’m learning a lot here thanks everyone for the help you guys are great.
 

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Don't have a whole lot to add, think all the important tips have already been covered, but definite kudos for decide to tackle this one yourself. Brakes are really pretty straight forward when it comes to DIY car work, and I really feel DIY car work in an integral part of being an E39 M5 owner, so good luck and have fun with the job!
 
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