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Why did you Replace your Brake Lines?

  • Upgrade/Performance

    Votes: 15 68.2%
  • Preventative Maintenance

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • Age Related Failure/Worn Out

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • Damage/Improperly Installed Previously

    Votes: 2 9.1%
  • Other

    Votes: 1 4.5%

  • Total voters
    22
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Discussion Starter #1
My car is a 2000, with 115,000 on it, and I'm considering stainless brake lines.
I've read a few threads where improperly installed lines failed, but haven't seen one where a properly installed OEM line fails due to old age.
So while I'd like to install the parts, I'm curios to see what interval others did their lines at, 150,000 would they be fine until 200,000?
If you pick other, or even if not, please post your why and your mileage.

I'm planning on rotors/pads/sensors/fluid, so there will be bleeding, but it should be fairly straight forward to not introduce air into the system.
Installing the new lines would open up that possibility.
So, saving a few hundred dollars, and a bit of time interests me, but at the same time, I don't want to skimp out, I'd rather do it right once.

Yes, I read this very informative thread:
http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/e39-m5-e52-z8-discussion/171058-bleeding-brakes.html
 

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1,478 Posts
2003 / 85k miles. Replaced due to line wearing through and bursting because line was twisted and rubbing on suspension part.

That being said, many may not have had failures, BUT, after heading into some tight turns and a good clip and hitting the brakes and having a brake hose fail I have reflected a bit on the entire situation.

Rubber does not last forever, I give it a 8 year life expectancy in my book. Although I had a line failure, once looking closely, it had all kinds of hairline cracks in the outer jacket. Heat, UV light, vibration, shock, road chemicals, oil, general abuse all factor in to a brake line life span. But these are not your basic sedan or mini van, many of us at times tend to push these cars to the limits, including quick application of the brakes, hard braking while cornering and enabling ABS at times. These all add to the punishment of brake lines.

So you go to the effort to install new rotors, pads, maybe calipers, or upgrade the brake components and you over look the brake lines?? Maybe not worth it in the long run?

Given brake hoses are not overly expensive I would strongly encourage anyone with a E39 or any other 8+ year old performance car to consider replacement brake hoses, either OEM or if you prefer higher performance, go with a quality stainless steel reinforced hose.

One note for anyone changing OEM hoses to stainless, make sure you speak with the vendor to make sure the correct lines are obtained to work with the OEM calipers. Many of the non OEM calipers require a different connection than the stock OEM calipers.

Lets just say at the end of the day your brake hoses will be cheaper than your insurance deductible!
 

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SS lines because they came with the brembos, i would have left the rubber lines on the car if the brembos didnt come with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
70 views, only 5 voted.
I think that I needed another poll option for "did nothing" or something to that extent.
I would think that of the 65 non voters, a lot still have the OEM lines, and have 100k mile cars.
Oh well, there's good info here regardless.

Lets just say at the end of the day your brake hoses will be cheaper than your insurance deductible!
I very much appreciate your input, and I had read your thread prior to posting this one.
My 1996 Jeep Cherokee (comparing apples to llamas here) the hard line mounted on the body actually rusted through, and failed during a panic stop at highway speed.
But even that, the hard line failed at 15 years 150,000 miles, where the flexible rubber lines to the front calipers was still in decent condition.
So I can empathize with your advice, loosing brakes at speed is not a fun thing to have happen.
That thought process is the reason I'm even considering it, I'm a firm believer in "ain't broke, don't fix it" but I'm trying to balance that with good preventative maintenance.

Thanks to all for the input.
 

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Changed mine out last week when I upgraded to Stoptech rotors, pads, ss lines, and Motul fluid.
 

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i got my car and did a brake overhaul the week of delivery with new less-dusting pads, superblue fluids and since im doing fluids, i figured change the lines since you need to open the valve anyway...
i got the ECS tuning brake lines, not too much difference in feel over stock
 

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When I purcahsed mine I had shaking in the front end. I shopped around and bought slotted rotors brakes and ss brake lines. I figured if I'm going to do it just do it right. I didn't realize how better they were until I was on the highway and had to make a sudden stop. When I looked in my rearview mirror every car that was behind me ended up in the breakdown / hov lanes.
 

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I didn't vote because I haven't changed them out yet but it is on my list. I always say rubber starts to go south at ten years but have no arguments with starting at eight years.

Even if they do not cause a catastrophic failure the rubber still breaks down. This leads to contaminated fluid and expansion that in turn causes a softer pedal and longer stopping distances.

I'll admit it's pretty oldschool but PTFE lines belong on closed courses where they are exposed to less debriis and are checked frequently. They cover the lines with stainless for a reason, but it is still a trade-off, putting braking power ahead of longevity. If you do have "SS" lines get in the habit of checking the braid closely for any damage. Simply replacing rubber for rubber is more than adequate for a street car and will make a big difference in braking power.

Good Luck,

dj
 

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I'm still wondering on weather to get the ECS or Stop-Tech SS brake lines... ? They both look great but supposedly Stop-Tech pressure tests each line to a fairly high PSI. The ECS kit has that "5th" brake line that the Stop-Tech does not have/provide... ?

Which kit would you fellas recommend??
 

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I am guessing the 5th line might be for the clutch slave cylinder?

Do not know anything about the ECS, however, the StopTech look nice with the rubber ends and they appear to have some sort of clear plastic covering over the stainless steel braid?
 

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I changed mine last year at only 50,000 miles (80kms) as I was planning to track the car this year. Replaced with stock lines but did add brake cooling this year. I don't need a lot of excitement braking for turn 8 at Mosport.:checkeredflag:
 
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