BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just got a new clutch installed for my beast. Any tips on a proper break in process to make it perform better and last longer? TIA!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
881 Posts
dmz said:
Just got a new clutch installed for my beast. Any tips on a proper break in process to make it perform better and last longer? TIA!
No hard launches, dropped clutch, full throttle applications, etc. for approximately 300 miles. Apparently the clutch 'face' is very slightly conical in nature, and hence needs to be gently broken-in for longevity's sake. There is a statement to the effect in the manual I'm sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,553 Posts
Per BMW:

BMW AG - TIS
RA: Breaking in SAC clutch
Issue status (03/2002)

Break in the friction linings of the clutch by applying light to medium loads, in the same way as for brake linings. This preconditioning creates a carbon layer between lining and metal friction surface which in the end generates the necessary coefficient of friction. Breaking in can take the form of either normal driving with many gearshifts or a specific breaking-in program on gentle gradients.

"Normal" driving will not damage the clutch. "Normal" driving conditions involve drive-off speeds of up to approx. 2500 rpm on a medium gradient, e.g. when driving onto a transporter. Normal driving off on a level surface at speeds up to approx. 2000 rpm are likewise sufficient.

Sporting driving maneuvers will destroy a new clutch! These include driving maneuvers at high differential speeds, overlaps or very high drive-off speeds, e.g. when driving onto a transporter.

When a vehicle is moved "normally", an empirically established figure of approx. 800-1000 gearshifts is applicable to an optimally broken-in lining.

Please conduct the following breaking-in program in order to avoid later customer complaints:

* specifically for M5 and Z8 vehicles

Breaking-in program for approx. 30 km on road

Vehicle subject to "moderate" shifting processes

Drive off at max. 2000 rpm; upshift 1->2, 2->3, 3->4; upshift at 3500-4000 rpm, downshift 4->3, 3->2, 2->1, downshift at 2000 rpm

Drive off 3 to 5 times on a gentle gradient up to approx. 12%, drive-off speed max. 2000 rpm

:cheers:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,515 Posts
Lower drive-off speeds and short slip durations are better. I'd be dropping the clutch quickly and walking away from stops at around 1400 RPM or less. The 2500 figure allowed by BMW is way excessive (not necessary).

A new clutch is no different than fresh brakes. Avoid high loading friction in order to reduce heat generated. Drive like grandma for a couple hundred clutch cycles (few weeks/500+ mi). The fresh, rough surface of the clutch disk needs to first become polished...without getting hot, before high torque & heat absorption capabilities are available. A clutch won't provide max capability until it has well over 1000 mi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
881 Posts
Steve,
Thanks for the clarification. I thought that the distance one was supposed to 'baby' a new clutch was the same as most car manuals will tell you to be careful with the brakes, approximately 200-300 miles.
Bish (Gaspasser)
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
About this Discussion
4 Replies
4 Participants
thebishman
BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums
M5Board is the best forum community for information on the BMW M5 E60 (V-10), E39 (V-8), E34 (straight 6), E28, F90 and F10. Discuss performance, specs, reviews and more!
Full Forum Listing
Top