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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys.

I previously searched your guys methods to remove water stains/spots and just tried to remove them on my truck. I washed the car, clayed the hood, washed and they were still there (a little better). How many times do you need to clay the surface? Do you wash, clay, wash, clay, etc..... until the spots are gone. This is my first time, usually I just pay someone to detail the car but the water spots are REALLLLY bad and wanted to give it a go myself. Any insight is appreciated.

Is it possible that the stains are the type II that require a more aggressive treatment? The car in question is my Escalade that gets hit with the sprinklers all the time. The spots have been there for months. Is this a problem?

I used Mcguires products.

TIA.

Michael
 

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As far as I know, claying will remove debris (brake dust, carbon, tree sap, etc) but not those water spots. For that, you need a sort of polishing compound with a pad and some elbow greease or a polisher.

I recommend Adam's Polishes' Swirl and Haze Remover. That thing works beautifully. I was able to get glass from a truck that's been outside for years looking brand new again, and without a polisher. Just apply generously, 25 strokes vertically, and 25 strokes horizontally.
 

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A cleaner wax works well for them. I use the wax shop stuff. Swirl removers will work too.
 
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As mentioned, clay is only effective on surface contaminants. Water stains are actually a physical defect of the paint and therefore require a cleaner, polish, or rubbing compound depending on severity...

d-
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. I will go to the store or order via the internet and try again. I guess I'll try Adams or Imperial as recommended by the above posts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi guys. I wanted to report back. You guys were right on the money. I bought a rubbing compound (I think Turtle wax is the mfg.) that states on the package for light to medium scratches and oxidation. I followed the directions and the hood is much, much better. I didn't have time to do the entire car but this is the way to do it. It's gonna to take a few attempts but this is the trick in case you have water spots. Give it a good wash, dry it, rub on the rubbing compound (don't swirl) let stand and use a clean cloth (micro) to wipe off. As said, it's not going to come off on the first try (at least mine didn't) but it is much better. Hope this helps others to rid of water spots. Thanks to all for their very helpful posts.
 

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White Vinager and water does the job

mix 70% (water) 30% (white vinager) and wash the car with it. Then do your normal car wash and you will be surprised. I have a black car and it works everytime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So, are you saying no rubbing and sweating like a pig in the driveway? I'm going to try this today. Just so I am clear, I assume that I add the car soap with with the water/vinegar mix. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Disregard the last post. I just found this:

Water Spots Will Ruin Car Paint!
The same water you use to bathe your car can also damage your car's paint. The spots and damage are caused by the minerals in the water. When water evaporates off of your car's paint, it leaves behind the trace elements it contains. Calcium and metals are the most damaging ingredients found in your tap water. Rainwater may contain damaging acids from air pollutants.

Getting rid of water spots is easy if you chase after them. The best solution is to use a quick detailing spray after you wash, or as soon as you discover the spots (i.e., when your neighbor's sprinkler gets you).

If the spots are allowed to dry and bake on, they will attach to and harden on your paint. When this happens, you need to use a mild acid to get them loose. Believe it or not, the best acid is also the least expensive and most available: a gallon jug of distilled white vinegar.

Expert car detailers have known this secret for years. If you take your car to a pro, they will tell you about the "magic acid bath" and charge you $60 or more for the pleasure of smelling like a pickle. Save the $60. Put on some gloves and get to it.

To give your car the magic acid bath, first wash your car with your normal car shampoo, rinse, and then use the distilled vinegar. Just wipe it on with a sponge, and rub it in. Do one section at a time. Let it sit 30 to 60 seconds, and then rinse. When you're done, wash the car again with shampoo, and then rinse. By the way, vinegar will remove your wax, so be prepared to re-wax your car after the vinegar treatment.

Sprinklers showered this car with hard water. The car then sat in the sun for several days, causing the hard-water deposits to harden. Vinegar will remove the spots from the aluminum bumper, plastic taillights and rubber trim, but the paint will need to be polished and buffed with a buffer.

If water spots are allowed to stay for more than a week or so, the minerals will etch the paint. In this case, using vinegar will remove the mineral spots, but the paint will have etched spots (dimples). It is necessary to use a polish or mild polishing compound to restore the paint surface.

Polishing to Remove Water Spots & Swirl Marks
If your water spots or swirl marks are severe, I recommend using a product like Sonus Restore (SFX-1) to knock them down. Follow the application of SFX-1 (or any other cutting polish) with a gloss-enhancing polish, such as Sonus Enhance (SFX-2). In all cases, use a good foam applicator pad to apply compounds and polishes. Use the least abrasive pad necessary to get the job done. For hand polishing, the Sonus SFX Professional Applicator work very well.
 
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