BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here's yet another thread on the subject. I purchased the Viton o-rings from McMasters and finished the job this morning. I used this DIY and worked just fine, with a few exceptions. No surprises or anything extraordinary. I still have to ventilate the vanos system; I'll get to it tomorrow. I just want to share some tips in case anyone is contemplating doing this. Why did I do this, you may ask? No special reason except peace of mind and a little "car therapy" for my PTSD :grin.

1. I left the right side (passenger side) radiator hoses attached to the radiator and detached them from the thermostat housing. Not much room to get a firm grip on the hoses and I didn't want to brake anything. Worked like a charm; removal and re-instalation of the radiator and fan was a breeze.

2. I made a screw holder using a piece of flexible tubing to help reattach the solenoids. I was able to reinstall them without dropping any screws. The flexible tubing made it easy to twist the screws "hand tight" then follow thru with the torx bit. Reinstalling the solenoids took me less than ten minutes per side.

3. Speaking of torx bits... I used a 2" long torx bit from a screwdriver set, attached to a 1/4" socket (1/4" drive). The thinner bit made it easy to reach the screws hidden between the solenoid and the VANOS housing during removal and installation. The flared 7/16" wrench and 1/4 drive socket adapter worked great and alleviated all clearance issues.

The Exhaust side o-rings on both heads were dried up and broke upon removal. The Intake side were still pliable and were removed intact. The image shows the old and new o-rings side by side (new ones are on the right)

There was an unbelievable amount of bugs wedged under the radiator covers and on the radiator panel. Lots of butterflies for some reason. I don't remember plowing thru a field of daisies. Cleaned all of it up before re-installation.



Enjoy. :wink
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
Thanks for posting this! Did you run the numbers before and after?

Also didn't think you needed to pull the radiator? Is that optional for more room?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
Thanks for posting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for posting this! Did you run the numbers before and after?
I didn't run the test... I've been meaning to do this because I noticed oil seeping from the driver side bank of solenoids when I replaced injectors and plugs. I had to use a mirror to see up there, but there was a enough oil to be a concern. Actually, two of the solenoid screws were just hand-tight and came off with minimal effort. I find surprises like that every time I take something apart.

I'll run the test tomorrow or tuesday when I take it to a nearby shop. My laptop doesn't seem to want to cooperate.

Also didn't think you needed to pull the radiator? Is that optional for more room?
I think removing the radiator is compulsory... not much room to work in there. Additionally, with the radiator out, I was able to clean all the bugs and dead critters lodged in and around the radiator. There was quite a bit. My son's 582i is ten years older and wasn't nearly as bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,445 Posts
2. I made a screw holder using a piece of flexible tubing to help reattach the solenoids. I was able to reinstall them without dropping any screws. The flexible tubing made it easy to twist the screws "hand tight" then follow thru with the torx bit. Reinstalling the solenoids took me less than ten minutes per side.

3. Speaking of torx bits... I used a 2" long torx bit from a screwdriver set, attached to a 1/4" socket (1/4" drive). The thinner bit made it easy to reach the screws hidden between the solenoid and the VANOS housing during removal and installation. The flared 7/16" wrench and 1/4 drive socket adapter worked great and alleviated all clearance issues.


Enjoy. :wink
Very clever set up for the "screwdriver". I'll have to get those tools for the next time. Thanks.

Could you provide a few more details on the 2" long torx bit ATTACHED to a 1/4" socket, and how it all goes together? Where does one find a 1/4 drive socket adapter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Very clever set up for the "screwdriver". I'll have to get those tools for the next time. Thanks.

Could you provide a few more details on the 2" long torx bit ATTACHED to a 1/4" socket, and how it all goes together? Where does one find a 1/4 drive socket adapter?


I know I got a set at Autozone years ago with various sizes T10-30? and a 1/4” adapter. It’s even a “security torx bit” set and so it has that little hole in the middle that I needed for my E46 MAF screws (not sure if E60 has any of these).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Here's yet another thread on the subject. I purchased the Viton o-rings from McMasters and finished the job this morning. I used this DIY and worked just fine, with a few exceptions. No surprises or anything extraordinary. I still have to ventilate the vanos system; I'll get to it tomorrow. I just want to share some tips in case anyone is contemplating doing this. Why did I do this, you may ask? No special reason except peace of mind and a little "car therapy" for my PTSD :grin.



1. I left the right side (passenger side) radiator hoses attached to the radiator and detached them from the thermostat housing. Not much room to get a firm grip on the hoses and I didn't want to brake anything. Worked like a charm; removal and re-instalation of the radiator and fan was a breeze.



2. I made a screw holder using a piece of flexible tubing to help reattach the solenoids. I was able to reinstall them without dropping any screws. The flexible tubing made it easy to twist the screws "hand tight" then follow thru with the torx bit. Reinstalling the solenoids took me less than ten minutes per side.



3. Speaking of torx bits... I used a 2" long torx bit from a screwdriver set, attached to a 1/4" socket (1/4" drive). The thinner bit made it easy to reach the screws hidden between the solenoid and the VANOS housing during removal and installation. The flared 7/16" wrench and 1/4 drive socket adapter worked great and alleviated all clearance issues.



The Exhaust side o-rings on both heads were dried up and broke upon removal. The Intake side were still pliable and were removed intact. The image shows the old and new o-rings side by side (new ones are on the right)



There was an unbelievable amount of bugs wedged under the radiator covers and on the radiator panel. Lots of butterflies for some reason. I don't remember plowing thru a field of daisies. Cleaned all of it up before re-installation.







Enjoy. :wink


This was an awesome write up man. Thank you for this. I actually need to replace 3/4 solenoids as test plans shows 3 failing and this will come in handy...

Fingers crossed that the used ones I replace them with are in good condidtion






Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
This is the package for the flexible tubing I used to hold the screws, 1/4" I think. Any rubber tubing will work but this is what I use to bleed my brake lines. It's softer and more "rubbery" than standard fuel or vacuum line. I bought it at Oreilly's auto parts.




This was an awesome write up man. Thank you for this. I actually need to replace 3/4 solenoids as test plans shows 3 failing and this will come in handy...

Fingers crossed that the used ones I replace them with are in good condition.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Any tips or tricks u used to remove them? I know they are a pain in *** and can be stripped very easily


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Redleg9: So did this improve the VANOS quality figures? I'd love to think this is an alternative to replacing below acceptable limits on the valves considering their expense.

Thanks for posting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Yes I'm wondering also if this help.
I don't have problem (until now) but I'm curious if the o-ring change
avoid the solenoids to fail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Yes I'm wondering also if this help.

I don't have problem (until now) but I'm curious if the o-ring change

avoid the solenoids to fail.


I received my o-rings and are removing and installing new set of o-rings on my solenoids tonight. Fingers crossed that it fixes my issue. I had my solenoids “supposedly repaired” by Troy an today will be the telling truth whether or not it really got repaired and WORKS. Here are previous readings before. As it stands car runs like poop and idles terrible. Hopefully values are over .65 to make it read OK




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,445 Posts
I received my o-rings and are removing and installing new set of o-rings on my solenoids tonight. Fingers crossed that it fixes my issue. I had my solenoids “supposedly repaired” by Troy an today will be the telling truth whether or not it really got repaired and WORKS. Here are previous readings before. As it stands car runs like poop and idles terrible. Hopefully values are over .65 to make it read OK




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
My understanding is that you should put 100km on the new o-rings before doing the test again.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top