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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

This DIY is for those of you with the early Vanos covers who would like them to resemble and perform just like the newer version. As you probably know you can buy the newer version at no great expense, but if your like me and tend to spend evenings doing little projects read on!

The conversion came about from my troubles in this thread.

First of all you will need to following tools and parts:

  • Pillar Drill
  • Drill Vice
  • Set Square
  • Caliper measuring tool (or equivalent)
  • Center punch
  • Cutting lubricant or equivalent
  • Center Drill
  • 8.5mm Drill bit
  • M10 Tap + Wrench
  • M10 x 10mm Flat face Set Screws x 8
  • 5mm Allen(Hex) key
  • Thread Lock agent
It is also worth noting that if you have not already been in to change your Vanos seals/check soldering and wiring then this is a good chance to dive in there and do it at the same time. This is a well documented thread about the subject, I suggest you read it if you are considering the job.


Step 1:

Once you have your Vanos covers off the car and generally clean, measure the center of each solenoid seat and center punch them:

Measuring.jpg Center Punched.jpg

Step 2:

Center drill each seat and then drill each hole to 8.5mm making sure everything is nice and square:

Center Drilled.jpg Drilling.jpg

Step 3:

Tap the holes to M10 thread making sure the tap is completely square as you go along, this is important as the set screw will be pressing on the SV, if this is not dead on you will run into more problems than you had to start with!

Tapping.jpg Make it square.jpg

Step 4:

Clean up the covers with compressed air or other means and insert the M10 Set Screws:

M10x10mm Flat Face.jpg Insert set screw1.jpg Insert set screw2.jpg

Step 5:

Insert your refurbished SV's back into place and bolt the covers on with the set screws clear of the SV's:

Insert SVs.jpg Cover on set screws undone.jpg

Step 6:

Apply thread lock to the set screws and tighten to 16 N-m torque:

Apply thread lock.jpg Apply 17 N-m torque to set screw.jpg

Done! Sit back and admire your work... Then build your air intake again!

Finished.jpg

Here is a video of Before and After the work. On your first start expect to hear a loud rattle as the air is bled from the Vanos system.

The only cost for me was the M10 set screws at £4.50 for a bag of 50. It helped having a very well equipt workshop, kindly supplied by who else but my Dad!

I hope this has been helpful to you, refurbishing my SVs certainly has brought my beast back to life. I had a long list of problems... Now it's not quite as long!

Have a nice day :M5launch:

Tom.
 

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Sounds great and it's a vey tempting to upgrade my VANOS units of beast before the beginning of the next season. So, the SVs come pretensioned then - great... but do you maybe know what is the difference between the solenoid valves on old units and the newer ones?

Older part nr. - Solenoid valve (SOLV) - 11 36 1 407 823 - Only applies to Cover without threaded holes 11 36 1 406 836
Newer part nr. - Solenoid valve (SOLV) - 11 36 7 831 450 - Only applies to Cover with threaded holes 11 36 7 831 684

Thank you. Have a nice day, Saso
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Saso, Sounds like a plan, the beasts will always like a bit of TLC!

In regards to different solenoids myself and http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/members/sailor24.htmlSailor24 had a conversation about the subject here, he came to the conclusion that it was down to different manufacturers producing them and actually there is no difference. He has seen and repaired plenty of boards and has not noticed a different type. I am confident that there wont be an issue hence me modifying the covers in the first place! But I have to say that it's our opinion on the matter and is not fact.

Good luck with the retro fit!

Tom.
 

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If we look at the nice imprints on your covers the noids have the same and different numbers on them. Don't know if that means anything just noting. It is possible that there is a stronger back on them and the thickness is hidden on the inside. So I guess we will have to wait and see if yours blows up.:biggrinbounce:
 

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what about using a set screw with some sort of nylon part that takes/damps/distributes the brunt of the force placed on the solenoids?
 

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I am quite familiar with mechanics and part numbers - sometimes they differ with no obvious reasons and then you get all sorts of debates around differences between the parts "because I've read about it somewhere" - but the guy never had the parts in hands.

My beast is maintained like in aviation with regular maintenance and preventive maintenance even before I got into trouble. Since I already plan the complete Vanos seals swap before the season this is a logic step further. If it's done right (I am ordering new updated covers) and the grub screws are torqued there shouldn't be any problem.

Thanks for help (and humor) :)

Have a nice day, Saso
 

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Finally I found some time - mod was done approx. two months ago. Dr. Vanos seals with new covers and grub screws



... one of the solenoids contacts was broken, of course fixed and tested for operation



"Old stuff" out - i was shocked on how were the old seals hard-plastic-like and brittle, I had some traces of oil under the cover in the left unit.



... and "new" torqued in



It's nice to see the updated vanos covers, apart from that feeling it's hard to comment any improvement on sound or performance. OK, I did the inspection service, oil change and the chain tensioner also ... engine is now considerably quieter and smoother in idle, maybe - but really just maybe - it feels a bit torquier. The bottom line - beleive it or not @Sailor24, nothing blew up by now and I guess it won't in the future :hihi:

Have a nice day, Saso
 

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Thanks for the DIY.

Modded mine with set screws over the weekend. I used my drill press to drill each hole and then used the press chuck to hold the tap while I rotated the chuck by hand. A little kerosene (tiki-lamp oil) works well as a cutting fluid. Once it's in about 5 revolutions, I release the tap from the chuck and finish tapping by hand.
 
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