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Discussion Starter #81 (Edited)
Last weekend, the ASVH,which is a local car club in Hellendoorn, the Netherlands organized a meet-and greet event for its members who happen to be owners of classic cars. The general definition of classic cars is 30 years and older, but as there are many owners of special and unique cars that are a tad younger than that, the term youngtimers has been defined; generally cars between twenty and thirty years of age.

This event was aimed at a wide variety of owners, thus not limited to a specific brand or genre. The event started on the 20th of April at 13:30 with a static show followed by a small drive towards an old motorcycle track, the Luttenbergring. This ‘ring’ still offers some driving thrills and a unique location for a photo-shoot. Nowadays, the Blikweg section is a public road with people living in its close vicinity, hence it goes without saying that we behaved as gentlemen rather than hooligans. Nevertheless we had fun.

The following series of pictures show #231 approaching the S-curve in the Blikweg section; As the camber changed direction for three times before exiting the second curve, it is best to turn-in sharp in order to obtain a best approach for the second. If one stays to the outside for too long, one not only loses time, but also fails to settle the car properly for accelerating out of the second corner, which is essential for the high-speed left-turn that follows soon after. .



This approach simply would not be possible without the new suspension components that were fitted in December/January. The above picture clearly shows the difference in suspension travel on both sides. Upon exiting the first part of the S-curve, one has to allow for some settling time, a second or two will do.



Upon the turn-in of the second curve, #231 is stable and ready for picking up speed before….



Entering the second corner that can be driven in a straight line at full speed without disturbing the cars balance.



Picture courtesy by Richard Hammers ( www.rallyinthepicture.nl ).

The overall summary is that I am impressed with the new front suspension. I have often driven the same road with a various number of cars and with #231 it was not possible to do that with the same agility and control as on last Saturday.

More pictures of this event can be found on my facebook album
 

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The M5 looks nicely balanced thru that S-curve, Raymond.

Roughly what speed are you carrying through there?
The front-on images don't give much indication of this, but I'm sure you weren't on a leisurely Sunday drive!

Very nice photos all the same...the car looks superb!
 

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Discussion Starter #83
The M5 looks nicely balanced thru that S-curve, Raymond.
Yes, it even surprized me

Roughly what speed are you carrying through there?
The front-on images don't give much indication of this, but I'm sure you weren't on a leisurely Sunday drive!
My turn-in speed was slightly above 80km/h; kept it constant until the car settled, and accelerated through the second corner until reaching about 110km/h.

Very nice photos all the same...the car looks superb!
Thanks; the photographer did a damn good job.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
The sharknose meeting is an annual event for owners of classic BMW’s until the E30 model range. This year’s event marked the fourth edition that for the first time took place in Arnhem, The Netherlands on the premises of the Rijnhallen exhibition-center.

Whilst the F Breeman Classic car event was aimed at displaying the top of the classic BMW model range, the Sharknose meeting is aimed at a wide audience ranging from regular models that are still used on a day to day basis to the very top; not only qualitative, but also rarity, amongst others some very rare Alpina and M-car models.

The distance from my home to Arnhem is more or less 80-90km, mostly highway but also a small section of a lovely country-road through the Sallandse Heuvelrug which is a combination of hills that originated from the last ice-age when the glaciers retracted to the North. A lovely road, around ten kilometers in length connects two villages, Nijverdal and Holten. Now, the downside is that this is one of the national parks in the Netherlands because it’s the habitat of a few rare species; nevertheless, the road is still open and enjoyed by many.

Already in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s era, local owners of performance cars used this road for ….. errrr ….. let’s say spirited driving. My own father for instance has a lot of memories from that era, not least because he wrecked his brand-new Opel Commodore GS/E in 1970 or 1971 whilst attempting to break a four minute time barrier in an off-line competition between members of what was then still an unofficial car-club, but who annually participated in the ‘ten countries tour’, an event that was aimed at driving through ten countries as fast as possible with custom stamps in ones passport as proof. There is little written proof from that era, but from the same memories, the fastest time was achieved by an owner of a BMW early in the 1970’s; a few hours past a day’s limit for little over 3000km

Now weather or not these statements are accurate or even possible is open to debate. To achieve a four minute driving time between the two villages, an average speed of 140-150km/h is required. This compares to a lap time of 8min42sec on the Nurburgring Nordscheife, something that only a very few cars could achieve; Porsches 911(F) Carrera RS 2.7 comes to mind and maybe very maybe BMW’s own E9 3.0CSL road-car, but these cars were built to be light an agile and both were in the 200bhp league.

Another benchmark is BMW’s E34 M5 that achieved about the same lap-time when it was released in 1988, but needed a much more powerful engine with 315hp and a much more sophisticated suspension to do the same. Therefore I doubt that road going cars, as sophisticated and performance oriented as they were for their own time in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s, were capable of achieving such a fast pace; …….; A fact is that their spirit of driving was heroic to some and declared insane by others and by today’s standards still is insane for twisty country-roads.

Nevertheless, despite some changes to force a lower driving-speed, the Holterbergweg still offers some serious driving-fun, but we ain’t living in the early 1970’s anymore… nowadays, the tolerance for spirited driving is low…. Very low, but nevertheless still fun to do so from time to time;. Enjoy.

<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/68493086" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/68493086">Driving fun with a BMW E28 M5</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user7724484">raymondw</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

Oh yes, #231 performed flawlessly; the video footage actually confirms that the suspension repairs of last winter resolved the last suspension issues; there is absolutely no vibration or brake-judder anymore; furthermore, the precision of the steering greatly improved resulting in a much better agility and suppleness then before.
 

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Discussion Starter #85 (Edited)
Reinstated the URL's to the pictures for a second time; this time following a critical issue in my photobucket account, which photobucket acknowledged, but could not resolve.

Please note that this also applies to all my previous postings that date back to 2004 or so. I will repair the links, but this may set me back for about at least a year.
 
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