BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Took the beast to the track this weekend and it performed on par for a heavy powerful car. However, it desperately needs suspension upgrades to help in the corners. I would like to keep the EDC if I could, so I was thinking the Dinan Stage 2 Suspension package. My only concern is that I have heard the Dinan springs are not really that good compared to H&R or Eibach. So has anyone mixed an aftermarket spring company with Dinan Sway and roll bars? What would you guys recommend as a good setup for occasional track use (6 times a year)?

Here is part 1 of the 20 minute session:

YouTube - Eagles Canyon M5

Part 2:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Egr8mybjVEk


 

·
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
·
2,823 Posts
Took the beast to the track this weekend and it performed on par for a heavy powerful car. However, it desperately needs suspension upgrades to help in the corners. I would like to keep the EDC if I could, so I was thinking the Dinan Stage 2 Suspension package. My only concern is that I have heard the Dinan springs are not really that good compared to H&R or Eibach. So has anyone mixed an aftermarket spring company with Dinan Sway and roll bars? What would you guys recommend as a good setup for occasional track use (6 times a year)?
Don't believe most internet rumors. The Dinan Stage 2 setup will make a noticeable difference. Since it was developed as a unified system, it's best to use all of its components. I challenge anyone to tell the difference between different makers' springs if the spring rates are the same. The Dinan setup was great for me on track. The other thing to do is max out your front negative camber to arouind -1.75 degrees. That still isn't nearly enough for optimal turn-in and preserving your front tires, but it's the best you can do without going to camber plates.

Pay attention to the brakes. Use a higher grade brake fluid so you don't boil it and consider installing stainless steel brake lines. If you do plan to track as often as you indicate, get pads that you will install for track use and remove for street use. Pagid RS19s work well. Turner Motorsport has them for both front and rear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
Took the beast to the track this weekend and it performed on par for a heavy powerful car. However, it desperately needs suspension upgrades to help in the corners. I would like to keep the EDC if I could, so I was thinking the Dinan Stage 2 Suspension package. My only concern is that I have heard the Dinan springs are not really that good compared to H&R or Eibach. So has anyone mixed an aftermarket spring company with Dinan Sway and roll bars? What would you guys recommend as a good setup for occasional track use (6 times a year)?
I recently tracked my car two weeks ago as well. I have the following suspension components and brakes:

KW V3, RDSport front/rear sway bars, Cool Carbon front/rear pads, ATE Super Blue brake fluid, and Stoptech stainless steel lines.

You can go with eibach springs with RDSport front/rear sway bars for suspension. We weighed the rear sway bar from dinan compared to stock and it's 1lb heavier than stock and the same thickness as stock (I was surprised!).

The cool carbon pads with ate blue and ss lines made the car stop really well compared to stock. You do have a lot of options, but just sharing what I have and it works great :)
 

·
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
·
2,823 Posts
Dinan did not mess with the front sway bar. According to Dinan, the M engineers did such a good job with that piece that there wasn't much to be done to improve it. Instead, Dinan engineered some pieces for the front that reduce roll, and it works remarkably well. I have not tried the RD setup, so cannot compare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
In addition to the good advice above, I'll add this....

I recently added a set of Ground Control adjustable camber plates (I was getting tired of wearing the shoulders off the front tires). These plates add up to an additional 2 deg. of camber over and above the stock set-up and are easily adjusted back to stock for street use. I recently ran two consecutive tracks days with the new plates adding the full 2 deg. and the difference at turn-in is definitely noticible (without being radical or darty - if that's a word). I'm definitely liking the improvement!
 

·
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
·
2,823 Posts
In addition to the good advice above, I'll add this....

I recently added a set of Ground Control adjustable camber plates (I was getting tired of wearing the shoulders off the front tires). These plates add up to an additional 2 deg. of camber over and above the stock set-up and are easily adjusted back to stock for street use. I recently ran two consecutive tracks days with the new plates adding the full 2 deg. and the difference at turn-in is definitely noticible (without being radical or darty - if that's a word). I'm definitely liking the improvement!
Yes, camber plates are the key. I retired the M5 from the track right when the first camber plates for the e60 were being developed. They came out too late for me. My main concern was the ability to adjust the setting back to reasonable street use. Do you find that you can adjust it back and forth without the need to align the car?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,210 Posts
The most important points are brakes, tires, and suspension (in that order, if you ask me). To me brakes are the #1 priority because if they fail you are more or less screwed. Make sure you have good fluid that isn't too old and has been bled well. You can also get stainless lines and better pads to swap out for track days as mentioned previously, but it seems most people get by fine with good brake fluid and maybe stainless lines. I'd say fluid is a requirement, the pads and lines are optional.

Tires - good tires is the key to any good handling car, and with a heavy car like the M5 this is especially true. Typically you'll want the best you can afford (within reason). If you are serious about track days consider a second set of wheels (possibly 18's) with a nice set of R compounds.

Suspension - camber plates are probably most important as most have said. Helps save your tire edges, helps maintain maximum contact patch through turns and helps turn-in a bit too. A Dinan Stage 2 kit is also a solid place to start.
 

·
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
·
2,823 Posts
Tires - good tires is the key to any good handling car, and with a heavy car like the M5 this is especially true. Typically you'll want the best you can afford (within reason). If you are serious about track days consider a second set of wheels (possibly 18's) with a nice set of R compounds.
Do you have specific recommendations for an 18" wheel that would work for track use on this car? I tried three different wheels and, while most fit, the clearance between the outside of the caliper and the inside barrel of the wheel was so slight that I decided it was not a safe solution since brakes generate such tremendous heat in a track environment. Again, my info is now quite old, so if an 18" solution is available, this is a great option for a set of track wheels because (1) the 18" size opens up many times the available tires and (2) sizes and 18' tires are noticeably cheaper than 19"s.

And only reasonably experienced drivers should use R-comps. R-comps are virtually silent near and at the limit, and have much more abrupt breakaway characteristics, so a good feel for the car is needed before jumping to that level. Once one does, there is a tremendous improvement in braking in addition to cornering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
Yes, camber plates are the key. I retired the M5 from the track right when the first camber plates for the e60 were being developed. They came out too late for me. My main concern was the ability to adjust the setting back to reasonable street use. Do you find that you can adjust it back and forth without the need to align the car?
I'll admit right off that I don't do all of my own wrenching, but I'm going to be doing this myself very soon. For now, my mechanic says it is as simple as it gets, no allignment necessary - the stock setting puts the toe and camber right back to the stock setting.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top