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Discussion Starter #1
Are the generic ones on eBay fine? Or should I get the orange huf ones..?
 

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Got mine from eBay a year ago for my 166 wheels. Works for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Always safe to go with HUF. If the ebays ones are a wrong frequency then your car will not pick up the signal.


2010 E60 M5 • Space Grey
Yeah but I'd save $70 going generic eBay haha.........

Got mine from eBay a year ago for my 166 wheels. Works for me.
Do you remember which one you purchased?
 

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Yeah but I'd save $70 going generic eBay haha.........


Do you remember which one you purchased?
Checked. Seller I bought from has none in stock. I believe if they are 433mhz, you should be fine.
 

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thoughts?
Doesn't say anything about them fitting a E60 but you can always return them no?

 

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Huf is the original equipment TPMS sensor manufacturer for the e60 platform. There are three different model numbers that are directly compatible, they are: RDE008V21, RDE011V21, RDE048V21. what is most important is that you get fresh ones since the battery has a service life of 10 years. You don't want to "save money" by getting ones that are cheap but were made in 2012. That said most of us still have working originals that came with the car, although in the next couple years we will all need to get new ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #11

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Discussion Starter #12
Huf is the original equipment TPMS sensor manufacturer for the e60 platform. There are three different model numbers that are directly compatible, they are: RDE008V21, RDE011V21, RDE048V21. what is most important is that you get fresh ones since the battery has a service life of 10 years. You don't want to "save money" by getting ones that are cheap but were made in 2012. That said most of us still have working originals that came with the car, although in the next couple years we will all need to get new ones.
These would be for my track set. I just don't want that TPMS light and I don't really want to disable my TPMS in the event I sell the car and forget to re-enable it. But, you're right, generally saving money and cutting corners is a bad idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Those are sometimes from customers that have bought the product, I sometimes buy from here https://www.fcpeuro.com LIFETIME warranty!! I've returned items under their lifetime warranty policy.
I've not purchased anything from fcp yet, but my buddies have. It's just tough to stomach that much for tpms, it's not like I rely on them to tell me to check my tire pressure, I check them really often haha.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
It'd be super handy to get live pressure readings when at the track. I think nbt is required for that. Oh well...
Right?!?! I'd love that feature...oh how technology moves yet we stay. If only the engine wasn't so adorable.
 

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The other danger about buying TPMS sensors that are non compatible is that you won't know that until the sensors are installed meaning that your tires need to be mounted and balanced. You will have then wasted money to dismount and remount your tires. I have my own mounting machine and Hunter roadforce balancer but it's still a waste of time. Even if it is using the same 433 MHz frequency it still may not be the correct protocol, it is a system. For example Siemens/VDO makes TMPS sensors also using the 433 MHz, but I don't know that they will work with the e60. I guess I could try it out since I have some Siemens sensor for my other GM cars, but I have plenty of rehab work for my M5s. Until some one has proven that non Huf manufactured sensors work, I'd shy away from other those other brands.

TPMS sensors are designed to go into hibernation mode and are only activated either by a specific radio wave wake up signal (that is what those handheld TPMS sensor reset tools do) or a certain amount of rotary movement. This is why you can only reset your TPM until after you drive the car for a bit, the sensors have to wake up then they start broadcasting their signal and then the internal antennas can pick up the individual TPMS signal(s).

Huf sensors are also used in some of the service kits like the ones that Schrader provides as a national parts distributor and repacker. This is just like what Febi Bilstein for alot of parts. The national tire chains often have the Schrader kits, but they are going to charge you a nice markup. You can find good deals on eBay you just have to know what you are looking for and which is why I referenced the Huf part numbers.

As far as tracking, I'll just offer a few words of caution. If your tires are set at 35 psi, they will quickly get to 43-45 psi after 3 laps, especially the fronts on track with heavy braking required. You will get over pressure warnings. Dummy lights aside, you will have to let out air since the grip will be suffer at 45psi, and your times and lines will get worse. So then you let out 10psi to get your tires back to 35 psi. Well on drive your way home, the air in your tires will have cooled down substantially and let say you also stop to grab dinner. You will then have like 25-29 psi in your tires and will get the under pressure warning light and could even get a dynamic dismount if you take a highway sweeper too hard since that heat cycling and low pressure are a perfect formula for allowing the sidewide to help pull away a weakened the tire bead seal seat.

This is why if you track your car and "run what you brung", you have to have a precise tire gauge with a bleed down button/valve and air pump to put back in the air after you get done with your sessions. Good thing our M5s have an air pump in the trunk.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The other danger about buying TPMS sensors that are non compatible is that you won't know that until the sensors are installed meaning that your tires need to be mounted and balanced. You will have then wasted money to dismount and remount your tires. I have my own mounting machine and Hunter roadforce balancer but it's still a waste of time. Even if it is using the same 433 MHz frequency it still may not be the correct protocol, it is a system. For example Siemens/VDO makes TMPS sensors also using the 433 MHz, but I don't know that they will work with the e60. I guess I could try it out since I have some Siemens sensor for my other GM cars, but I have plenty of rehab work for my M5s. Until some one has proven that non Huf manufactured sensors work, I'd shy away from other those other brands.

TPMS sensors are designed to go into hibernation mode and are only activated either by a specific radio wave wake up signal (that is what those handheld TPMS sensor reset tools do) or a certain amount of rotary movement. This is why you can only reset your TPM until after you drive the car for a bit, the sensors have to wake up then they start broadcasting their signal and then the internal antennas can pick up the individual TPMS signal(s).

Huf sensors are also used in some of the service kits like the ones that Schrader provides as a national parts distributor and repacker. This is just like what Febi Bilstein for alot of parts. The national tire chains often have the Schrader kits, but they are going to charge you a nice markup. You can find good deals on eBay you just have to know what you are looking for and which is why I referenced the Huf part numbers.

As far as tracking, I'll just offer a few words of caution. If your tires are set at 35 psi, they will quickly get to 43-45 psi after 3 laps, especially the fronts on track with heavy braking required. You will get over pressure warnings. Dummy lights aside, you will have to let out air since the grip will be suffer at 45psi, and your times and lines will get worse. So then you let out 10psi to get your tires back to 35 psi. Well on drive your way home, the air in your tires will have cooled down substantially and let say you also stop to grab dinner. You will then have like 25-29 psi in your tires and will get the under pressure warning light and could even get a dynamic dismount if you take a highway sweeper too hard since that heat cycling and low pressure are a perfect formula for allowing the sidewide to help pull away a weakened the tire bead seal seat.

This is why if you track your car and "run what you brung", you have to have a precise tire gauge with a bleed down button/valve and air pump to put back in the air after you get done with your sessions. Good thing our M5s have an air pump in the trunk.
Thank you for putting the time and thought into this post. You're right about the pressure. When I get the track I normally drop a warm tire down to around 30 psi and after a session I'll be around ~40 psi. It's generally fine since it'll cool down by the time my next session takes place but I did get a tire pressure warning.

I'll just get the huf...=(
 

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Thank you for putting the time and thought into this post. You're right about the pressure. When I get the track I normally drop a warm tire down to around 30 psi and after a session I'll be around ~40 psi. It's generally fine since it'll cool down by the time my next session takes place but I did get a tire pressure warning.

I'll just get the huf...=(
Excellent choice. There’s some things to go cheap on and there’s some things where you should spend money on.


2010 E60 M5 • Space Grey
 
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