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Jahangeer said:
my insurance company (BMW Original Insurance Sweden) had a simple enough answer over the phone.

If the tire/wheel combination passes the "Besiktning" or MOT equivelant in the UK - it is allowed to be a valid upgrade with the insurers at no extra costs.
And does it pass the MOT equivalent in the UK? That's the question now! Maybe m-black can give them a call - he's in Ireland
 

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Gustav said:
Thing is, it is ISO that decides load rating for the tyre, not Continental. That is what that organasation purpose is as far as tyre ratings if I understood it correctly.
Well haven't we answered the question then? ISO has said that the tyres are not rated 96, they're rated 92 and Continental has said that they're reinforced so they market it as 92 XL which ISO has not given them a 96 rating for?
 

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Maybe
ISO rates tyres and with that "Extra load", normal and also the same way for less load.

Hartge wheel rating (based on load in kg) from Hartge are:

Rear: 710 kg = 96
Front: 650 kg = 93

sydl said:
Well haven't we answered the question then? ISO has said that the tyres are not rated 96, they're rated 92 and Continental has said that they're reinforced so they market it as 92 XL which ISO has not given them a 96 rating for?
 

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It has passed German Tüv which is one of the most stringent test in the EU considering also it's unlimited Autobahn.
 

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Gustav said:
It has passed German Tüv which is one of the most stringent test in the EU considering also it's unlimited Autobahn.
What has? The wheels? I'm not talking about the wheels.

The issue is whether a non-OEM tyre, on a car is covered by the car owner's insurance. Passing a TUV test is not what our laws and local authorities and insurance company looks at. All they care about is whether the tyres (not wheels) are as per the manufacturer's specifications. It's really got nothing to do with the wheel manufacturer Hartge - it's the driver/owner - the person who sold/put the tyres on the car.
 

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That wheel and tyre combination. OK, seems like we might talk about different things here.

"And does it pass the MOT equivalent in the UK?"
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I've called The NCT people - Ireland's MOT and spoken to the insurance company.

The NCT will pass the tyres they have absolutely no issue with them as long as they are fitted and inflated correctly

The insurance company had no problem, they just wanted to know it would pass the NCT.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
One other Insurance matter that was raised was durabiity, as In Ireland and some parts of the UK pot holes are a real problem and seeing as the 21" Tires are

255 / 30
295 / 25

Maybe with our less then stellar rural roads, these might be risky.

any opinions on the durabilty of Contis in the /30 /25 range
 

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sydl said:
I have no doubt that Hartge's engineering is up to scratch but there are countries that do not accept TUV or other standards except their own.
A long long time ago I used to be product manager for a very well known electronics company. Part of my job was to make sure the launch of a product was internationaly coordinated and a part of that was making sure that certifications and such were in order. Funny thing is that most countries just look at the TUV papers and accept that. Only in very rare instances or with products which have a radio transmitter additional tests would be required.

I don't know if this is also true for the automotive industry but I'm guessing it is because TUV has the strictest rules and guidelines.

But you do make a valid point there. If the product has a TUV certification and not the certification for your country your insurer would make a fuss about it even if the TUV certification is stricter. Why? Because insurance companies are "not very nice".
 

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sydl said:
And does it pass the MOT equivalent in the UK? That's the question now! Maybe m-black can give them a call - he's in Ireland
Just to give an idea all the MOT in the UK are bothered about is the fact that the wheel and tyre combination does not sit outside the widest part of the fender at the top of the wheel arch.

That is it!!!!!!!

That is no where near as strickt as TUV.
 

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sydl said:
What has? The wheels? I'm not talking about the wheels.

The issue is whether a non-OEM tyre, on a car is covered by the car owner's insurance. Passing a TUV test is not what our laws and local authorities and insurance company looks at. All they care about is whether the tyres (not wheels) are as per the manufacturer's specifications. It's really got nothing to do with the wheel manufacturer Hartge - it's the driver/owner - the person who sold/put the tyres on the car.
The TUV process invloves testing of both the wheels and tyres.

The final TUV certificate states the vehicle, wheel sizes, and exact tyre sizes and manufacturer(s) in most cases if they have tested more than 1 tyre. The TUV would highlight the fact that the tyre is not correct. The way they check if the tyre is correct for the car is by using TUV's data of that particular car, which in this case has been supplied to them by BMW. Believe me if the tyre was not as per manufacturers specification then they would not approve it for TUV.

I hope that clarifies it.
 

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m5-black said:
One other Insurance matter that was raised was durabiity, as In Ireland and some parts of the UK pot holes are a real problem and seeing as the 21" Tires are

255 / 30
295 / 25

Maybe with our less then stellar rural roads, these might be risky.

any opinions on the durabilty of Contis in the /30 /25 range
Hi M5-Black

I have not used 21" conti's but have used Conti's in 255/30/20's and 305/25/20's sizes on SL55 AMG's with no problems. Yes you will have to be a bit careful when you drive them on bad roads, but that is accepted when you are running such low profiles.

And to think my first Alpina B9 ran 225/50/16's on the rear and I thought they were low profile and really wide!!!!ouich
 

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m5-black said:
I've called The NCT people - Ireland's MOT and spoken to the insurance company.

The NCT will pass the tyres they have absolutely no issue with them as long as they are fitted and inflated correctly

The insurance company had no problem, they just wanted to know it would pass the NCT.
Very interesting - sounds like your authorities and insurers aren't as strict as down under.

It sounds like they don't care about load rating.
 

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sydl said:
Very interesting - sounds like your authorities and insurers aren't as strict as down under.

It sounds like they don't care about load rating.
Sydl the insurers here would not even know what a load rating was!!!

All they ask is are you running aftermarket wheels what they cost and if they increase the value of the car.
 

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Amjad Ali said:
Sydl the insurers here would not even know what a load rating was!!!

All they ask is are you running aftermarket wheels what they cost and if they increase the value of the car.
Same over here aswell. I can imagine that this is something that wouldn't apply to a "regular" road going car which can barely reach 200km/h (124mph) and doesn't do the hard acceleration and breaking an M5 does. If you fit 17, 18 or maybe even 19 inch rims under a "ragular" car then I can imagine that there is a very wide range of tyres you can choose from and almost any tyre will do. These cars probably make up 99% of their bussiness.

But for a car like the M5 or whatever other "supercar" (I don't concider the M5 to be a supercar cause it's not supposed to be, although it is) which can easily run +300 km/h and can do very hard acceleration and breaking this becomes a mayor safety issue. But because it's not part of their everyday bussiness they're not aware of it or simply don't care.

Ofcourse this is sepculation but it should be something every M5 owner should be aware of, make sure you have the correct tyres before you decide the pull the throttle to full or else very bad things might happen. Specialy make sure the pressure in your tyres are correct before doing 250 or 300 km/h cause it's very easy to destroy your tyres at those speeds.
 

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Amjad Ali said:
Sydl the insurers here would not even know what a load rating was!!!

All they ask is are you running aftermarket wheels what they cost and if they increase the value of the car.
Okay I did some research on the subject and this might come as a shock.

If you get a aftermarket exhaust then you need a certificate saying the new exhaust conforms to sound and emission regulations.

If you get your front windows tinted (rear can be as dark as you want) you need a certificate saying the windows still have a x percentage shine through and have good visibility.

But if you get new wheels, you don't need anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
frylord said:
Okay I did some research on the subject and this might come as a shock.

If you get a aftermarket exhaust then you need a certificate saying the new exhaust conforms to sound and emission regulations.

If you get your front windows tinted (rear can be as dark as you want) you need a certificate saying the windows still have a x percentage shine through and have good visibility.

But if you get new wheels, you don't need anything.
Yep same here - As noise and emissions get tested during our National Car Test Agency test - and Tinted windows will be checked

Whereas Tyres - only have have correct tread, be fitted correctly, have no serious damage and not protrude too far.
 
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