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Hello, I am storing my M5 for the winter :(

It will be at a garage close by that I will have access to anytime so I can start it up and roll it a little so the tires don't get bald spots.

The garage already has mouse traps down and I heard that putting downy sheets in the car will prevent them from coming in. I guess there were traces of them in the past.

I also heard that a full tank of gas is better than an almost empty tank. Maybe less evaporation? Dunno.

This is my first car that I have stored.

Thanks much.

Dave
 

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Company Representative for Brecus Motorsport
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My personal winterizing list -

Prior to storage, I drive the car for 30 minutes with AC on (this lubricates the seals and empties the heater core)

1. Deflate tires to 20psi
2. Battery charger - Make sure the battery charger charges at no more that 1.25A, and has "intelligent" charging features that shuts off and turns back on when needed.
3. Add fuel stabilizer and fill the tank to the top (this keeps condensation from forming in the tank).
4. If the car is going to sit for more than 5 months, I drain the engine oil before storage and fill back up when I want to drive her again. Filter can stay.
 

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You are better off not starting the car to move it a couple inches. IMO you are doing more harm than good. If you want to start the car, take it for a little drive on a nice winter day, nice and easy as this will get the engine up to temperature.
 

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My personal winterizing list -

Prior to storage, I drive the car for 30 minutes with AC on (this lubricates the seals and empties the heater core)

1. Deflate tires to 20psi
2. Battery charger - Make sure the battery charger charges at no more that 1.25A, and has "intelligent" charging features that shuts off and turns back on when needed.
3. Add fuel stabilizer and fill the tank to the top (this keeps condensation from forming in the tank).
4. If the car is going to sit for more than 5 months, I drain the engine oil before storage and fill back up when I want to drive her again. Filter can stay.
I think you mean *inflate* the tires to the max setting. Deflating the tires to 20psi will most certainly flatten out the tire over the winter. I also don't get why you'd drain the oil-- change to fresh maybe so it's less acidic.
 

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It was recommended by few mechanics at my dealer. Also I have a friend who does the same with his Porsche. Car is parked at my son’s condo with high security and ambient temperatures. I unplug the battery. A full tank of gas. I put on my winter wheel set. Inflate the tires. Last spring car started with first attempt. No loss of memory (only clock) everything else was working perfectly well. :byebye:
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
^That is one clean garage! If I had to store it in a public garage I would use a cover as well. I would have to imagine that the battery would still drain some. Did you just unhook the negative terminal?

I think I will get some Sta-bil to reduce water build-up. As for the tires, I don't think I will bring the pressure down to 20psi. I think that will increase the chance of flat spots like doug said. A battery tender would also be a great idea.

I also think that starting the car for about 15 minutes and letting it get up to temp and not driving it would be a good idea. I will be taking it out once or twice for a drive but in between those times I would like to run it.
 

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No way I would deflate the tires. :dunno:

Putting it on jack stands is ideal.

Disconnect battery and/or use a Battery Tender.

Dont start it unless you are going to drive it at least 20 miles.

As you are not deserting it. Opening it weekly or so, on dry days would be a good idea to prevent condensation and mold. Alternately, something like this:
Willert Home Products - Keep It Dry Closet Dehumidifier
 

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Deflating the tire actually spreads the weight over a larger area, reducing the likelihood of a flat spot. Over deflating the tire will stress the sidewall, 20 psi is the safest in my opinion. Over 3 Months you will most likely not see flat spots anyway.
 

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^I also think that starting the car for about 15 minutes and letting it get up to temp and not driving it would be a good idea. I will be taking it out once or twice for a drive but in between those times I would like to run it.
Not recommended only if you take a car for real ride for at least 1/2 hour. If you start your car for 15 minutes you will destroy the engine by creating a lot of heavy deposits in your engine. If you like to take it out for a drive you should do it at least once a month. :blink:
 

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Dave - if you're storing it for the winter due to salt, snow, etc. - you may just consider taking it out for a run on the dry days of winter. I live in Michigan and that's works for me. good-luck.
 

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Not sure what the "right" answer is to this question, but here is what I do for both my wife's 335cic and my M5

We usually store both cars from Thanksgiving to Mid April, since here in New England they love to salt the roads very heavy in the winter and the pot holes in Southern New England are notorius in the winter season with numerous freeze/thaw cycles.

We store in a heated garage under our house

Full Tank of Gas
Trickle Charger (especially the M5)
add 10psi to all tires (my dealer states this is what they do with a car sitting on thier lot)
Park my wifes 335cic on rubber mats
Park my M5 on molded Tire cradles (a/k/a Race Ramps flatstoppers)
Cover both cars with a heavy duty cover

Once or twice during this period, I will start both cars are "warm days" and let them run for a 1/2 hour period. I note the valve stem locations prior to movement, then make sure when I put them back the tires are 180 degrees opposite.

We have done this for years with no issues noted

Hope this helps

 

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ok, here is how I do on my car that is not been driven during winter.
Not sure, they are the right things to do. Flame on me if I am doing wrong.

1) 3/4 gas tank
2) Tires pressure untouched
3) New battery (changed in March 2010)

Just simply every 2 weeks (already scheduled on my outlook calendar to remember me), I start the car for only 2-5 mins then shut it down. (my garage is not heated but has insulators).

Any new suggestion?
 

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Just simply every 2 weeks (already scheduled on my outlook calendar to remember me), I start the car for only 2-5 mins then shut it down. (my garage is not heated but has insulators).
I have to imagine this method is extremely stressful on the engine creating a lot of unnecessary friction. I don't see the point in starting the car for 2-5 minutes. Surely you are wearing down the battery as 2-5 minutes is not enough to charge the battery and the oil is barely warming up. Why not just leave the car alone and wait until spring?

It was almost 50 here yesterday and took the M5 out on a nice ride making sure the engine was at full operating temp. While I don't drive my M5 every day in the winter, I drive it enough that it's not stored. I look at it this way, just a car that is depreciating in value and a little winter exposure is not going to rust out the car anytime soon.
 

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All good suggestions, since you mentioned “critters” you may want to plug the exhaust tips, and on a concrete floor it helps control moisture if you lay a drop sheet of plastic under the car.
 

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Surely you are wearing down the battery as 2-5 minutes is not enough to charge the battery and the oil is barely warming up. Why not just leave the car alone and wait until spring?
thank you, I will follow your tip. I will leave it alone until spring.
 

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Correct the plastic acts as a vapor barrier and will help stop moisture from building up under the car. Less of an issue in a heated garage but concrete can still leach moisture from the ground under.
 
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