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have you guys ever heard of improving car performance by spraying water INTO the engine? apparently there's some new product that does this and claims to boost performance by as much as like 20% or something.
It's here: http://www.smartune.com/waterinjection_detail.htm
 

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That is for turbo charged cars! Not the M5! What it does is further reduce the temprature of the air going into the cylinders, by way of a small injection of mist (H20)into the air system after it has been pressurized by the turbo. I believe that Mitsubishi uses a sytem similiar to this in it's newest EVO car. The water will change states (into oxygen) because of the extreme heat, so there won't necessarily be "water" being injected into the combustion chamber.

Neat idea though, perhaps you S4 owners should give it a look as I have heard that these cars tend to have a very high operating temp.
 

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Well, if you go and look around that website, under smartuner... they have some pictures of the M5, and they said that one of the future mods for that car will be the water injector??
here's the link: http://www.smartune.com/Smartuner/smartuner_bmw.htm
 

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Ryan,

I have not yet had any problems with excessively high operating temperatures with the car, but then again, at least 97% of my driving is on the highway. We'll see how the summer treats it though, when I drive out to the Long Island shores.

Water injection has been around for quite a long time; it's nothing new. Want to try something different? Try acetone.
 

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spraying water into the engine can promote rust exactly where you do not want it. I would not be interested in such a system for an M5. However, this is this red stuff i think called water wetter that mixes with the coolant to lower engine temps. Let me know if anyone wants more info on this product.
 

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Originally posted by TurboPhoon55:
spraying water into the engine can promote rust exactly where you do not want it. I would not be interested in such a system for an M5. However, this is this red stuff i think called water wetter that mixes with the coolant to lower engine temps. Let me know if anyone wants more info on this product.

What water wetter is is simply, a chemical component to add to your radiator water that will reduce the waters boiling point and will also increase the coolants ability to quickly lower its temprature. It's like using Mercury as you coolant. Mercury has an incredible heat dissipation effect, Such as the way an Aluminum block engine will come to operating temp quicker and cool down faster that that of an Iron block engine.

Water Wetter is some type of chemical additive that will alter your coolants heat dissipation. This will allow for a cooler entrance temprature after the coolant has passed through the radiator, hence a lower operating temp.

This may not make much sense as I know I am not using the proper terms, but let me clarify if need be.
 

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Roman,

Perhaps "excessive" was not the proper word. I have little knowledge on the S4 as I have never driven it or really closley examined it. But I have heard from a comparison on this message board that someone had stated that the S4 seemed to be alot hotter when the driver had turned it off and parked it. He had come to the conclusion that the S4 just operates at a much higher temp (Obviously)due to it's twin turbo's. So I'm sure that it won't over heat, but that it just runs hotter.
 

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It sounds like this water wetter is a wetting agent. A wetting agent promotes better contact between a liquid and a solid surface which would in turn promote better cooling. Similar agents are used in chemical milling to promote more consistent material removal, by eliminating microscopic bubbles between the acid and titanium.

As far as turbos running hot, this is caused by two factors: the close proximity to exhaust gases and the extremely high rpm's that the turbos run at 40000-50000rpm. This puts quite a strain on the oil. Usually it is not a problem with the car running, but when you shut it off the oil in the turbo can literally cook. To prevent this a system is installed to keep circulating the oil with an electric pump after the engine is shut down. In the old days, it was recommended to let the car idle for a time prior to shutting down. I do not believe this is a problem on modern turbos. Though, a turbo engine will generally have a shorter life than a normally apirated motor due to more heat input.
 

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There is a lot of heat generated by those two cute little turbos in the S4, granted, particularly when people have asked to see what pushes the car and I pop the hood open. However, I do have to tell you that I have had normally aspirated cars before that have generated MUCH more heat than this car seems to. Being that these turbos run only about 10 psi, the generated heat would be that great. However, if you go for more psi, such as 14-15, then it would probably be a LOT hotter. If I ever considered "chipping" the car, I guess this is something I need to expect.

The S4 also has an intercooler for each cute little turbo, so I am certain that makes somewhat of a difference. And I still follow the old rules of letting the car idle for a few moments after a hard drive before I shut her down. Audi has reassured me that oil continues to recirculate even after I shut the engine down, to prevent this coagulation of the oil in the intercoolers.

I think however, that most new turbo'd cars don't run as hot anymore. I do remember my friend's 300ZX TT getting so hot after a hard run that neither of us would dare open the hood until after about a few minutes of idling. But that was back in 1991, so I imagine that turbo engineering has come a long way since then.

Ryan, I am not surprised by some of the negative comments on the S4 made by several people on the MB, because well, this is the M5 board. I would imagine though that the heat issue holds true if you take the car to the track and run it at full throttle 80% of the time and then just pull over. But that holds true with just about any car.

I would be curious to know what type of setups BMW used in some of its turbo'd cars in the past, and how Alpina does its turbo work for its cars. Hmmmm....

As far as the diminished life of the turbo'd engine is concerned Jeff L, I would be inclined to believe that would hold true more for a non-European car. Audi de-sized the 2.8 liter to a 2.7 liter (actually a bit a bit less) just to accomodate the increased pressures associated with the turbos. So I think longevity was taken into serious consideration before they put this biturbo together. I don't think that was the case with the earlier generation single turbo Audi's.

As far as the water issue is concerned, I do remember that we used to every once in a while spray a bit of distilled water into our carbuerators during a tune-up, and water injection was also very common but I don't think it ever caught on because it wasn't really seen as a HP booster.

Some racers actually used acetone (I've tried that too but MANY years ago before fuel consumption became an issue) to increase their octane levels, while others even built boxes filled with dry ice around their intake nozzles to cool incoming air, if you can believe that!
 

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Water wetter, is a wetting agent(doesn't that look stupid?)anyway, as I understand it breaks down the hydrogen bonds between water molecules and negates surface tension, thus the water no longer wants to stick to itself(?) and it flows faster, and the water in your cooling system circulates faster.
This stuff is toxic so they might add some sort of corrosion(?) inhibitor, some wetting agents are safe for use in household plumbing.

for what it's worth
 
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