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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, its me again.

Ok, so i was just taking the piston out of the engine, when i noticed some broken part at the front of the engine. After some checking i found that this is, or better was, the hole where the bolt comes in which holds the chain guide.

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There where no parts in the oil pan, so i guess it happened some longer time ago at one of the previous owners.

As you can see its the lower bolt which holds the right guide (when looking from the front of the engine). The chain guide itself is still hold by another bolt and a screw.

The first option is to just ignore it. I dont think that will be such a big deal, as its the chain guide which is the least problematic. Usually its the guide with the tensioner or the guide in the v which makes problem, but not the right one.

The second option would be to weld something on it. Main problem i see here is that its close to the main bearing and welding could damage the front main bearing. The second smaller problem would be to find somebody who can weld aluminium, but thats the lesser problem ;). Furthermore i dont know if there are some oil canals near behind which could also be damaged.

I will talk to my engine guy about this problem, but i also wanted to hear your opinions as here are many guys with more experience with this engine and some people doing these engines for a living.

Thanks again, and i will update on what my engine guy says once i talked to him again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Ok, so a followup on this one. I did bring the engine to an engine guy sometime last year or this year and he fixed it. Basically he drilled a hole in it and then made an adapter which on one side had the hole for the bolt and the other end was screwed into the block and secured with loctite. I was very sure i did make a picture, however i sadly cant find it anymore.

Engine not running yet, so i cant provide any "long-term" experience.
 

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I didn't see your post then but your engine-guy's solution was exactly what I would've recommended looking into. Glad it worked and good luck getting it running.
 

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Interesting. This is the second time I have seen broken chain guides take that particular stanchion with them. That is a highly stressed piece, surprisingly so. Our recommendation to our customer who experienced this was to use a new block, which we did. At $500 for a new block, it was worth the insurance, particularly with a freshly built high output S62. But we drew this conclusion based on how difficult it would be to achieve a durable weld in that location without damaging other aspects of the block. Very creative to make a screw-in adapter! Would love to see a pic of the solution, but the concept is superior to that of welding the stanchion back on.

--Peter
 

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At $500 for a new block,
Sorry outside question but the new block must still be honed? What is the cost of shipping a block? In other words me shipping my 2000 block from Canada to you, going to have any real affect in savings based on buying a new one, yes I know in the whole cost it is insignificant but.... cheap at heart.
 

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Sorry outside question but the new block must still be honed? What is the cost of shipping a block? In other words me shipping my 2000 block from Canada to you, going to have any real affect in savings based on buying a new one, yes I know in the whole cost it is insignificant but.... cheap at heart.
Yes. The block with the broken stanchion was going to be bored, honed, and the silicone reexposed and so, too, did the replacement block. BTW, when I saw "new" I mean "new used block", not "new from BMW". New from BMW is 10X that ($5k). BTW, even the new blocks from BMW we bore, hone and reexpose the silicone.

Block shipping from Canada to VIR shouldn't be more than $350-400. Long block probably $500-600. But with the radical inflation of diesel prices, one never knows! The real question about using a new used block is availability. Sometimes, they seem plentiful; others, they are scarce. Upshot is that if your 2000 block has relatively clean cylinder walls, I would use it. Those 2000MY block rebuild very nicely in most instances.

--Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok, i am a bit surprised that its such a high stressed piece. I was thinking that its not a high stressed piece and it broke because one of the previous owners did like let the engine fall down or something. That is a bit unexpected to hear. It might change my plans with the engine in the future. On the other hand, I doubt I would have found a S62 block for 500 € in Germany. Well, at least thats something to keep an eye open for in the future.

I did check my pictures again and i was very sure i did make a picture, however i cant seem to find it. I do remember what he said he did. He said the thread is one number smaller than the one from the bolt which is screwed in the adapter. I am not completly sure why he made the thread smaller, but it may be that there are oil routes near behind. It maybe that he didnt really know how much space is there. I guess someone with more knowledge could maybe make a bigger thread. Also, i dont know how long the thread is.
 
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