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I shipped the selection of the possible culprit of the hydraulic assembly block to a specialist to conduct a research to determine why it won't build pressure at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I shipped the selection of the possible culprit of the hydraulic assembly block to a specialist to conduct a research to determine why it won't build pressure at all.
Keep me updated. I have a feeling mine has to do with the pump gear itself not creating suction due to a seal. My pump motor was 12 years old and the fluid looked as though it had seen some heat. The seals looked okay, but I think replacing the pump seals may fix my issue.
 

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I doubt it's the pump gear if it's not damage then it can't be the gear. Think about it, how is it possible to build pressure if you manually put a hose directly in the inlet and pump fluid in it all the while you have the pump running? Funny how I have never thought of directly pump fluid into the gear pump? I am curious, instead of pumping fluid, can you try using a hose that tape with a bottle that filled with hydraulic fluid inside while the hose is attached to the inlet of the gear pump with fluid already inside the hose waiting to be pull into the system? The purpose of this is letting the hydraulic pump do the work rather than you pump it in as opposed to attaching the reservoir. Does it build pressure that way? if so, I strongly believe something inside the reservoir has failed, just something in there that has a certain responsibility that ensures good suction. Honestly, I don't know. I am still waiting on hearing some more information from a specialist as they are more resourceful. Until then I will let you know.
 

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I doubt it's the pump gear if it's not damage then it can't be the gear. Think about it, how is it possible to build pressure if you manually put a hose directly in the inlet and pump fluid in it all the while you have the pump running? Funny how I have never thought of directly pump fluid into the gear pump? I am curious, instead of pumping fluid, can you try using a hose that tape with a bottle that filled with hydraulic fluid inside while the hose is attached to the inlet of the gear pump with fluid already inside the hose waiting to be pull into the system? The purpose of this is letting the hydraulic pump do the work rather than you pump it in as opposed to attaching the reservoir. Does it build pressure that way? if so, I strongly believe something inside the reservoir has failed, just something in there that has a certain responsibility that ensures good suction. Honestly, I don't know. I am still waiting on hearing some more information from a specialist as they are more resourceful. Until then I will let you know.
The transfer pump hose that I was using was the exact (within reason) size as the inlet to the pump. The pump would not build pressure unless I pushed a few psi behid the fluid into the pump. Once I had some force behind it, the pump then got suction. But once the gears stopped and there was no fluid present in the inlet directly on the gears it would not suction up.

So no, I can't just drop fluid on the pump and it suck it up. I have to put a few inches/lbs of force behind it in order for the gears to even start priming.

Hope that makes sense
 
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