BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For those of us who follow the world of F1 competition, the FIA has finally agreed to a new set of rules for cars starting in the 2008 competition season. These new rules, which have been in the works for years now, will make it less expensive to field a competitive team - i.e., it will put all teams on a more level playing field and the outcome of a race more in the realm of driver skill rather than technology.

Full report is at http://www.formula1.com/news/3272.html

Basically:

1) All teams will use an FIA mandated engine ECU supplier. This will make it easier to enforce bans on traction control and such.
2) The FIA will designate (mandate) a single tire supplier which all teams will use. They will also mandate a return to racing slicks on larger wheels (not sure if they mean diameter or width (or both)).
3) No more computer controlled "paddle shift" manual gearboxes - instead, all cars will use "old-technology" driver controlled clutch and gear shifting (some of us (yours truly included) see this as a welcome change - driver skill (wicked heel-toe, skip shifting) will be a must.
4) 90% reduction in downforce to encourage passing in turns.
5) "Standard" brake specifications.

2008 should be an interesting season. Does this mean the end of F1-inspired technology in high-end road cars too?

Jeff :cheers:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Some of those changes sound really good, but as you say is it going to effect the technology that is first pioneered through F1 and later moved to road cars?

Should hopefully make for more interesting racing though. Gotta say though, this year hasn't been bad at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
M5_SMG said:
Should hopefully make for more interesting racing though. Gotta say though, this year hasn't been bad at all.
USGP debacle excepted. ouich Michelin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
797 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
M5_SMG said:
...Should hopefully make for more interesting racing though. Gotta say though, this year hasn't been bad at all.
I have to agree with you on that. Many of my colleagues in Europe feel as I do...over the last 10 years technology has made F1 into a competition based on who can put what technology into the car faster than the other teams, which usually means who has the most money to spend.

Eliminating traction control, reducing downforce, normalizing braking technology, and putting a clutch pedal back in the car will push the sport more to a pilot versus pilot one instead of competiton on deep pockets.

Jeff cherrsagai
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
791 Posts
I agree that this season (US Grand Prix debacle excepted) has been entertaining as it is wide open as to whom will win the Drivers/Constructors championship. However, high technology is what distinguishes F1 from other road races and provides some of the trickle down innovations such as traction control, tire technology, SMG, etc to performance road cars. The manufacturers gain insight and advertising for racing at this level. The fans are recepients of the highest level of racing.

These six teams HAVE money to burn and can be competitive:
BMW
BAR-Honda
Ferrari
Mercedes-McLaren
Toyota
Renault

Suggestions:
1) Remove the 1-tire rule
2) Move towards one tire supplier, Michelin teams have won all but one race this season, so that could be a criteria for "winning" a contract for F1 tire supplier for next season.
3) Keep the V10 engine, development costs for a V8 is such a waste of money, when all that is needed is the implemenation of a "limiter" for horesepower, etc.

Cheers,
Kevmmm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,099 Posts
My big concern with rules like this is pretty soon Formula 1 will be back to carburetors to save fuel injection costs and stock looking bodies to do away with aerodynamic testing expenses. Gee, it will be just like NASCAR!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
I fear they are creating a "spec" series like CART. In the past F1 had been about finding ways to make cars faster. Whatever rules the FIA thought up, the engineers found ways to nullify them. This is one of the things that sets F1 apart from CART or NASCAR.

Also, how can the FIA provide an ECU for 6 or more different engine manufacturers. How will they guarantee that the ECUs will function. When a team has a DNF now, it is the team's fault. How will the FIA deal with the responsibility of providing an ECU that fails, or a faulty brake disc or any other part for that matter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,980 Posts
The ECU will just have the basics for Fuel maps that teams can load in to them. There are no provisions for traction control sensors in the ECU.
But like they say engineers have ways of working around those requirments.:7:
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top