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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Sometimes special tools are really needed but they are expencive. I dont really feel like paying few hundred euros for tool what i need once or twice.

Thought that we can share our self made tools and ideas.

Here we go!


Balljoints are PITA to remove and install. Made my own tool with Vantaam5.
Cost: about 30 euros

To remove balljoint:


washer, bearing, washer, 36mm socket, 8cm long pipe, washer.


And to install new:


washer, bearing, washer, washer, 3cm long pipe, 50mm modyfied socket, washer.


Took about 15min to take balljoin out and install new.


edit: All parts in one picture, see allso how you have to cut 50mm socket.
 

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did something similar when fashioning my own ball joint, bushing "press". however, i used copper piping, as it is a bit softer and less likely to mar the metal bits on the car.
 

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Digging this thread out, I am in the process of changing my ball joints, made my own tool very similar to above, and have got an issue, the bolt through the middle is not strong enough and is stripping. Question is, what is the bolt you are using there? If anyone can shed some light on it I would appreciate it.
 

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My experience with 10yr old balljoints on a northeast car is that the dissimilar metal corrosion (aluminum wheel carrier and steel sleeve on the balljoint) welds the balljoint to the carrier such that the force required to separate them can be incredible. I ended up using a 4' breaker bar and eventually the balljoint came free with quite a bang. Reinstalling is much easier and doesn't require more than a socket wrench, but for removal of stubborn balljoints, a hardened steel bolt/nut is necessary, unless you plan to go through several of the homedepot variety. I ended up using the HarborFreight ball removal tool with the large C-clamp tool - it's heavy, bulky and cumbersome, but it worked. The tools constructed above are a much better application, if the components are rugged enough to withstand some major force. For example, I tried using some sections of exhaust pipe, which quickly crumpled without budging the balljoint. Using large sockets or sturdier steel pipe is a very good idea, but as the previous poster suggested, the key is the threaded rod and nut/plate must be strong enough and long enough to get the job done.
ES
 

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Thanks for that.

Any chance you could post the outside and inside diameters of the pipe(s) you used so i could turn something up on the lathe in work?

Tom. The bar looks like 12mm fine threaded bar, i am assuming from a bearing puller or similar. What are you trying to use?
I would have thought a similar 12mm threaded bar/nut combo would work, but if your B Joints are as tight as the poster's above then maybe if you can get your hands on a bar with a fine thread from a steel merchants etc?
 

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The bar looks like it was from a coil spring removal tool.

It would be very helpful if you did post the diameter of the pipe you used and what type. I imagine exhaust tubing is too thin as someone previously states so interested to know what type of tubing worked.

I'm about to tackle this project as I'm sure other people are so thanks for the info.
 

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just bought this; so, infinite-special-tool time!

 

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Differential pinion bearing installer I made after damaging one bearing during install. This one is now idiot proof. I welded a pipe to an old bearing race with the ID honed out.



 

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^^ That's a pretty damn good weld job!
 
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