BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

21 - 29 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
There is a lot of internet discussion on how bad the N63 engine is and a lawsuit associated with that. Basically it seems that it is a fundamental problem of heat management with the placement of the turbos and the catalytic converter all in close vicinity and the "hot vee" of the engine. Here is one article, but there are many others:
https://www.eeuroparts.com/blog/9654/bmw-n63-hot-vee-hot-garbage/
If this is a fundamental design flaw of the hot-vee engine, why don't we hear it on the S63? I would imagine that with higher horsepower, the S63 engine would run just as hot if not hotter and would fundamentally be inclined to cook its valve stem seals, carbon on the intake valves, etc. Did BMW fundamentally address this issue on the S63 and not N63, or is it that there are so many fewer S63 engines that we don't hear much about it as there isn't a critical mass of cases to support a lawsuit as in the N63 case? Perhaps any engineers want to chime in if you are in the know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
I dont think its a heat issue
Its a design issue
The newer n63 motors dont have that issue

We actually got a new n63 motor from bmw on our x5 and it was about 3 yrs out of warranty
I was 2nd owner and low k and full bmw history

It was smoking a lot and timing chain stretched and cyclinders out of round
Also did new vac pump and injectors and pcv system
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I'm not aware of any rod bearing hysteria for the E39s. I thought that was all on the V10s.

Anecdote: I've had my E39 for 6+ years & 65k+ miles. Just passed 150k. Blackstone oil analysis in 2017 showed normal wear. I use Mobil 1 full synthetic, monitor the oil level, and baby the motor when it's cold. No motor issues whatsoever for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I'm not aware of any rod bearing hysteria for the E39s. I thought that was all on the V10s.

Anecdote: I've had my E39 for 6+ years & 65k+ miles. Just passed 150k. Blackstone oil analysis in 2017 showed normal wear. I use Mobil 1 full synthetic, monitor the oil level, and baby the motor when it's cold. No motor issues whatsoever for me.



For the rod bearing issue:
A friend of mine got an E39 and did the rod bearings last month at 145000km at the freelance shop of a former M engineer and said the bearings were almost done. In general the engine would have lasted for 2000km more with relaxed driving maximum. On one place copper was already visible. I asked this mechanic about my S63TU from '14 and he said its the same "issue" with all the S63. You have to look at rod bearings as a maintenance part (which is not listed as such by BMW) which has to be looked after by replacing the engine oil with double frequence to what BMW recommends and the rod bearings will last something between 80-120000km. However when doing lots of city driving or having many cold starts they should be changed every 60000km. Since he is making a living on mostly replacing rod bearings he probably knows what he is talking about. In 10000km I will find out, what my rods look like after 60k of daily city driving :eek...


For other S63 related issues:
There has been a dirty throttle actuator after 130000km on the E39 but nothing else on both cars what so ever, both cars were bought from second hand. (knocking on wood)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Haha youre right that was my feeling as well, before buying an S63 but to be fair the mechanic showed the rod bearings to my friends which are supposedly his...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
991 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
I'm not aware of any rod bearing hysteria for the E39s. I thought that was all on the V10s.

Anecdote: I've had my E39 for 6+ years & 65k+ miles. Just passed 150k. Blackstone oil analysis in 2017 showed normal wear. I use Mobil 1 full synthetic, monitor the oil level, and baby the motor when it's cold. No motor issues whatsoever for me.
Oh man. You couldn't give the E39 M5's away several years back. It's all how they were looked after, but the internet really tanked the value of that car because of it. Same way they did on the E60 M5 right now. Every single review out there mentions some sort of catastrophic failure looming around the next bend. It's pure insanity.

I don't honestly buy into it to be honest, but the fact that the masses (who are @SSes) do, cause the resales to plummet. And that, I'm not into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Bull. Complete bull.

As far as catastrophic failures in the S63, I'd say it's still the typical internet hysteria. I think part of the problem is that even BMW techs don't realize the total separation of an N63 from an S63, so there is confusion too. A "friend" of mine is a tech at the local dealer. He says they now run a second shift in the shop just so they can keep up with engine replacements (9.9/10 of which are for excessive oil consumption) and he wished me good luck. The thing is, the work they're doing is all on N63 engines, not the S63. When I clarified that to him, he had nothing to say. haha.

Anyway, in my opinion, I'd say the S63 is way better than the S85 you're getting rid of. The S62 is prone to sensor sensitivity and Vanos issues and an overblown rod bearing issue (no pun intend). The S85 has legit expensive repair concerns. The S63 doesn't have too much expensive go wrong with it, at this age anyway. Yeah, fuel injectors and pumps can go but some of that stuff is covered under BMW extended warranty and if not covered, they aren't ridiculously expensive. Of course some people have blown engines. I'd chalk up the majority of those to owners habits and aggressive tuning/mods on the stock bottom end.
As an owner of a 2012 X6M with a now-seized S63, I'd have to disagree with you. During my search for an attorney, I've uncovered more than a dozen S63 owners (X6M and X5M drivers) who've had their engines seize.

By the way, no luck finding an attorney yet.
 
21 - 29 of 29 Posts
Top