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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The new M5 seems to have a pretty complex running in procedure. Is it really the best way to go?? Not sure if anyone has seen this site, some probably have as it has done the rounds on a few forums.

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

I used this method on my Chev LS1 powered Holden, and it never had any oil issues which many others have reported. A few people also commented that my engine felt pretty strong for a stocker. :M5rev:

Not sure if I can attribute that to the method of break-in outlined on that site, or possibly I just got a "good one." (Engine that is..)

The guy who wrote it seems to have a background in bikes, so I can see the high-revving relationship between the V10 and a bike engine may lead to this break in procedure being of benefit to the M5.

Anyone prepared to try it on their new M5 or M6? Or has anyone used it on their E39 M5 and had positive results with the oil consumption issue? cherrsagai
 

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Thanks...very interesting article. Difficult to say "yes I defintely do this" as you might can into invalidating warranty issues. Some definite good points - which are common sense - like make sure you vary the engine speed (i.e. don't go and run in the car by driving it 1,000 miles on the motorway) and make sure the engine is warmed up properly.
 

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When I bought my M3, the German speaking dealer (I don't speak German and he didn't speak English) didn't tell me about the break in procedures. Only when I had done around 3000 km I noticed the small sticker on the top of the windscreen explaining it! I think that already from my first drive in the car I was regularly reving the enginge to it's limit. I now have around 50,000km, still driving hard as on day one and never had a problem, the engine is running perfectly and is truly amazing!

Will probably do the same to the M5 when it arrives ina couple of months!hiha
 

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RTm5 said:
When I bought my M3, the German speaking dealer (I don't speak German and he didn't speak English) didn't tell me about the break in procedures. Only when I had done around 3000 km I noticed the small sticker on the top of the windscreen explaining it! I think that already from my first drive in the car I was regularly reving the enginge to it's limit. I now have around 50,000km, still driving hard as on day one and never had a problem, the engine is running perfectly and is truly amazing!

Will probably do the same to the M5 when it arrives ina couple of months!hiha
Makes sense. There is a whole school of thought out there that the entire "break-in" thing is ridiculous.

Best regards,
 

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porsche don't have a breaking in period for their cars ,i cannot see a valid reason why BMW should have.
 

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I had read this before and found very intresting. The points made sound logical. If I had a M5 I would probably break it in this way...
 

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Call me crazy, but in choosing a break-in protocol, I will choose the protocol suggested by the engine's manufacturer (which just swept the Engine of the Year awards) over that promoted by a guy with a web site whose experience is mostly in motorcycles. I don't question his logic, skills or results, since I lack the knowledge to reach any conclusions. I just don't see a reason to depart from the manufacturer's suggestion, and am willing to be patient with the engine for the first few thousand miles.
 

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I think I can safely say that I will be kicking the ar*e out of mine from the second I drive it out of the showroom (in about 5 weeks, incidentally!). I've done the same with my last three Porsche 911s and never had any problems, apart from the occassional oil seal, but then isn't that what the warranty is for...?!? I just don't have a patience to drive like an old lady for the first thousand or so miles in a car I have waited years to get! :wroom:
 

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I have today reached the hallowed 1200miles at no more than 5500rpm! Oil service tomorrow at 8.30am then look out world!:M5launch: I agree entirely with MRichmond. BMW should know what they are doing!

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markf said:
porsche don't have a breaking in period for their cars ,i cannot see a valid reason why BMW should have.
In the manual to my father´s Porsche 997 they recommend a break in period of 3000 km.
 

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Mr Janne said:
In the manual to my father´s Porsche 997 they recommend a break in period of 3000 km.
In the words of my Porsche dealer - "You're only keeping it for a year. Don't waste time running it in...!" :hihi:
 

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This guy might be right about all this, and it seems to make sense, but some reasons I would NEVER break a car in like that..

1) In Denmark, its a $300.000 car, I would never take a risk with something that expensive.
2) The BMW tells you to break it in the other why, they made the engine, who should know better?
3) Of course the M5 is high-rev'ing, but this guy still has most experience with bikes, not with a V10 engine.
4) If his method is that great, I bet he would have made a better homepage :hihi:
 

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Reasons I would:

1) Any positive respons from this board, with the new M5..
 

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markf said:
porsche don't have a breaking in period for their cars ,i cannot see a valid reason why BMW should have.

Porsche's are not supposed to be revved over 5000 rpm for the first 2000 miles per the US owners manual .
Also, what might be good/ bad for the engine break in procedure early on may be BAD for the differential and transmission gears , which always need 700- 1000 miles to mesh together properly .
 

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Filthy Monkey said:
In the words of my Porsche dealer - "You're only keeping it for a year. Don't waste time running it in...!" :hihi:

That's why I never buy used cars . Imagine how a speculator and his buddies will " play " for the 100- 200 miles he " owns " a high demand car like the first few US M5s that will hit the market later this year !
 

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Very brave assumptions in comparing motorbike engine and V 10 or any other car engine hmmm ! I’m not agreeing with this guy and his article. It’s not difficult to take your new beast easy and slowly for say 5000 km is it? And in case, if something happens to the engine say after couple thousand km I guess you would have problems explaining BMW why you did not run in the engine when BMW will analyze all date of the engine :confused2
 

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Break in procedure:

[font=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] The rules to run in a brand new BMW M5 is the following:[/font]
  • <2000 km: not over 5500 rpm or over 170 km/h. No kick-down or engage the gas pedal fully.
  • Between 2000 and 5000 km: Gradually increase the revolutions and the speed, but not over 220 km/h. Do this only briefly, for example during overtaking. Do not use the modes D5, S5 and S6. Do not use Launch Control.
From:

http://www.m5board.com/articles.php?id=34&page=4
 

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The only cases I know of where a manufacturer doesn't recommend break-in are Ferrari (they run their engines in on a test cell before delivery), and my old boss who got a rebuilt motor from the Viper Team where they also ran it in.
I have no problem believing the folks who design, manufacture, and perform reliability testing long before customers ever see the car.
Nonetheless, that's a -really- interesting article. I just wouldn't try it out with what's probably a $25K engine.
 

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There was an article on this in a UK car magazine recently, can't recall which one. Anyway, the summarised version is that older cars had to be run-in slowly over the first couple thousand miles as it was necessary to get the cylinder and pistons to create a good surface together, this was all technical and to do with grooving and all sorts of tolerance issues. Modern engines apparently have much better machined surfaces and are made of much better materials so the desired tolerances are there from day one. The article basically said you can go mad right away, but it would be adviseable to do 500 miles or so fairly gently, just to let the transmission, tyres, brakes, etc settle in.

Cheers,
David.
 

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There are some valid points in the article, although I wouldn't rev the engine as high as they say. But full, or near full throttle up to the break-in imposed rev limit is not a bad thing. All that does is put additional load on the engine, which as pointed out will cause the rings to press a bit harder against the walls.

The interesting point I saw was the one about synthetics... that has always bothered me, and I wonder if it is the cause of some of the oil fouling I have seen in some cars.
 
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