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50 Degrees and sunny finally, so decided to take the cover off and check things out. Lifted the hood to take trickle charger off, and saw this white powdery corrosion on only the head (not sure about the block).
It's not salty, or sour (coolant), so I'm assuming condensate galvanic corrosion to aluminum.
It wipes off pretty easily, but getting all of it would be a monumental task.
Any advice?
 

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Sweating...engine still cold, outside temp warming up. I see this all the time. This happen to me one winter and ever since, I store the car in a climate control garage. I used marvel mystery oil on a cloth to clean. This also polished the aluminum up some. I took my time as many places are hard to reach or get to. You won't be able to get everything unless you drop the engine lol
 

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I personally frown upon getting anything wet under the hood. I know some people who gently power wash the engine bay often on their personal vehicle without any problems, but I wouldn't suggest doing this on the M5...not worth the risk getting water some place it shouldn't be in my opinion.
 

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What Racer said, times 3. The connections for the electrics are designed to resist occasional moisture, but not a direct blast of water. Especially on a vehicle with as many critical electrical systems as the E60 M5, I wouldn't even think about it. The rubber, wire coatings, and other electrical components are also known to be relatively fragile (read *ahem, "sub-par") on BMW cars of this vintage, compounding the potential problems. You get water into one of those puppies, and you might find yourself expensively chasing down the solution a tricky diagnostic problem - if not immediately, then down the road.
 

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I have my car in a warm garage...do I also need to worry about this residue appearing?

Is there anything one can do to prevent this from happening on a stored car over the winter?
 

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From what I know, a thin coat of oil is usually just the ticket to prevent oxidization of metallic surfaces. I had never heard of Marvel Mystery Oil until Racer mentioned it - sounds like something you would find a small sachet of as an Easter egg in a comic book - but it looks like something that could do the trick.

I was just cleaning my engine bay last night. Now that this thread brought it to my attention, it would be nice to put something on the bare metal surfaces to keep them corrosion-free.
 
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