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Since the only DIY on your radiator is for a 530, I'm going to do a writeup for my M5. I'm in the process of pulling the radiator now. I made a few mistakes along the way (and will eventually post pictures.)

Tools needed:
1-1/4" wrench (or metric equivalent) for pulling the fan.
Dual-hole fan part.
10mm wrench and socket (for holding the fan in place and for pulling air boxes)
8mm socket (for removing top radiator mount/clips)
Pliers (for opening the radiator drain and pulling on hose lock clips)
Flathead screwdriver, for hose clamp(s)
Proper receptacles for draining the radiator.

1) Put the car on blocks or a ramp so you can get underneath it.

2) Drain the radiator. There is a blue petcock drain on the left side of the car. It only needs to be turned 90 degrees. You also want to loosen the cap on the overflow tank so that there isn't a vacuum; air can go into the system as the coolant flows out. The problem is that the plastic petcock is usually clogged with debris. So, you can twist it then yank the whole thing out. Expect to get a little wet in the process. The car can hold up to 12L of antifreeze. Since my radiator was leaking I had quite a bit less :( You can use your pliers on this.

3) While the radiator is draining, remove the intake air boxes, as this will give you more room to work. This is where the flathead and 10mm come in handy.

4) Next is to pull the fan. I didn't do this step until after I realized it was in my way, and it was a tad more complex since I had less room to work since the radiator and radiator shroud were in my way.
http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/e39-m5-e52-z8-discussion/161321-diy-fan-clutch-replacement-pics.html

5) If your radiator is still draining take advantage of the time to remove the upper radiator hose. This hose removes pretty easily; there is a metal clip that snaps down onto the plastic housing which locks the radiator hose in place. Pull up on this clip. It does NOT come all the way out. Once it's up you can wiggle out the top radiator hose. You can also use your flathead screwdriver to help pull it out.

6) Now remove the overflow container. It's held in with a plastic pop rivet, which you can remove with a flathead screwdriver.

7) You can remove the radiator hose that goes into the overflow tank. There may be antifreeze in there which will spill. Maybe not. This is secured with a flathead screw holding a hose clamp together.

8) The overflow tank also has two hoses coming out the cap assembly. One of the hoses is tucked under the upper radiator shroud and goes into a plastic, 90-degree elbow into the top of the radiator. I'm not 100% sure where the second one goes, but I believe that is the pressure overflow hose. I was able to pull the 90 degree elbow out of the radiator, but I don't know if you're supposed to do that. The other hose clamps require the special hose clamp tool or will be destroyed. I'm on the "destroy them" camp and then replace them with normal screw-based hose clamps. Be careful, the hose that I think is the overflow hose gets brittle over time. I'm going to have to replace mine after it fell apart in my hand :(

9) Now remove the bottom radiator hose. This removes just like the top hose, with a metal fastener that pops up and the hose pulls out. Again, you can use the flathead screwdriver to kind of pry it back.

10) Now remove the shroud from the top and bottom. On the bottom it snaps in place in three places across the width of the car. On the top there are two more pop fasteners at each end of the radiator. It should pop out in one piece.

11) We can also remove the radiator itself. This is where the 8mm ratchet comes in handy. There are two small bolts towards the front of the car that hold the radiator in place. They are shaped like a "C" or an upside-down "U." With these out of the way the radiator should lift right out. To get the radiator out pull up and towards the back of the car. The bulge on the left-side of the radiator (right side of car) where the lower radiator hose attaches sits underneath the metal tubing for the air conditioner's evaporator. So the radiator has to pop "back" towards the engine in order to come out.

... other stuff to watch for. The radiator sits on two rubber pieces that may stay attached to the radiator instead of the body. Do these steps in order. I didn't, which is why I came up with this order. The radiator needs to be held tight in place to hold it there as you yank the hoses off. The fan needs to be out of there to make it easy to get the shroud out. I thought I could remove everything just by pushing the shroud back over the fan and pulling the radiator out. You cannot do this because of the bulge from the tanks on the side of the radiator, since they stick out under things like the plumbing for the power steering cooler and the air conditioner condenser.

I'll have more follow-up posts with pictures and the installation once the new radiator gets here.
 

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Nice, thanks. getting ready to change belts soon so this was useful to see how the shroud comes out. Plus one day I may need to change the rad?
 

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are you upgrading or putting in a new OEM?
 
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