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I've always had a slight weeping from my oil pan. I was never real serious so I left it alone. Recently I decided to go ahead and replace the o rings to the oil scavenger pumps. Thanks Vantamm for the DIY btw. As I under went pulleys, belts, and fan clutch preventative maintenance, I noticed there is no longer any weeping. I suggest changing them if you're performing an oil change. The oil pan does NOT have to come off.. just twist the oil scavengers so the mount flange is exposed in order wedge a flat head between the upper oil pan and flange. Slowly and lightly apply leverage to pop out scavengers.

Oh also, changing belts and pulleys really made a difference on my MPG. 17.1 mpg was my constant. after 1 tank of driving i was up to 17.4 mpg DME calculated. YAY!
 

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Are you referring to the scavenger pump solenoids (two identical solenoids on the left and right of the pan)? I have a weep from one, have all the o-rings and plan to pull them and inspect, test, replace at the next oil service (very soon). Just want to make sure I am on the same page. Any good tips for the project?
 

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Yup sure am. Just follow vantamm's instructions. I used a plumpers pliers to grip the selenoid to twist( maybe put some blue tape or something so it doesn't scratch the selenoid. YOu may be able to do it by hand if the o ring are really bad. that will expose the flange on the selenoid and you pry as i described with a flat head screw driver. There will be a bit of oil coming out so get that oil pan ready.

Are you referring to the scavenger pump solenoids (two identical solenoids on the left and right of the pan)? I have a weep from one, have all the o-rings and plan to pull them and inspect, test, replace at the next oil service (very soon). Just want to make sure I am on the same page. Any good tips for the project?
 

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When you take them out you should activate them and make sure they are working. My experience was that the one that weeped was not functioning. I think that is what caused the weeping.
 

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When you take them out you should activate them and make sure they are working. My experience was that the one that weeped was not functioning. I think that is what caused the weeping.
I have read your thread about testing. I plan to test and clean them both thoroughly. It sounds like these solenoids use 12V, PWM for power supply. Do you think something like this (along with a 12V power supply) will do the trick?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B007TH4EN6?pc_redir=1411847679&robot_redir=1#
 

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I just tested off the car battery.They are very robust. I don't think it is PWM for the actual opening underload. That does not make sense because they are tripped by hitting a certain G load. As soon as that G is hit you want them wide open. PWM is more for controlling things. As if you were going to have them a little open at .5 a little more at .7 etc.
If it is PWM then I suspect the power off part would be no more than 1/10 of the on and then you would hardly call it a PWM signal.
 

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When you take them out you should activate them and make sure they are working. My experience was that the one that weeped was not functioning. I think that is what caused the weeping.
Is there any way to repair the items in your experience, or is it a replacement only job in the event of failure? What is the threshold of activation of these? I'd imagine for the majority of time they are inactive, so it seems odd one would fail in a minimal use situation. New replacements are ~$1000.
 

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Mine was easy to repair. I did a thread on it. Search rod bearing preventative maintenance something like that, Easiest way to find it is click my user name at the beginning of this post then choose stats and find all threads started by me. I have not started many. There is some bad info in the thread because it was really the first time there were looked at, but easy to wade through.
 

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I just tested off the car battery.They are very robust. I don't think it is PWM for the actual opening underload. That does not make sense because they are tripped by hitting a certain G load. As soon as that G is hit you want them wide open. PWM is more for controlling things. As if you were going to have them a little open at .5 a little more at .7 etc.
If it is PWM then I suspect the power off part would be no more than 1/10 of the on and then you would hardly call it a PWM signal.
Are you sure it is not a PWM control scheme? PWM is very common for motor and solenoid control in the automotive world. It could be a switched battery signal, but as you said this may damage the coil over sustained periods. PWM allows for 0-100% duty cycle (which can ramp up and down rapidly between varying duty cycle) and would make sense for control of these solenoids. I will do some more research on our DME and let you know what I find. I was under the impression that most any solenoid on a car was PWM. At least in the GM world that is the case.
 

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It might be pwm. If it is it will only have a 100% cycle. If that 100% = battery voltage then it is hardly PWM even if it is. It will be PWM because of the nature of the DME and that the grounds run to the dme.. I don't remember what I tested specifically, but I never piss around. I understand how PWM works and argued with people here for two years about not using 12v to test vanos solenoids as the PWM signal although 12v in base was really only 5v seen by the noids.

What I am trying to say is if the PWM signal is battery voltage it is safe to test with the battery as long as you respect the duty cycle of the item being tested. My bet would be that I compared it to the starter solenoid.
 

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If you so nervous just hook up a gt1 go to expert mode and activate them while you have them plugged in
 

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I am not that worried, although at $1,100+ per I certianly don't want to damage them. I would rather just control them the same way the DME does. I'd rather not have them hooked up under the car when I can have them on a work bench. I plan to activate them multiple times while in a solvent of some type and then lubricate with fresh engine oil. It shouldn't be too hard to find out how they are controlled. I think PWM is a safe bet though.
 

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If you have the equip then go for it. If you don't buy, 4 new cps or mafs with the money and test as....
Although I can't remember my finds exactly I am pretty sure my probs were in the part that is in the air not the part that was in the engine.
If you figure something out please add it to my thread.
 

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If you know how to do that, could you reply to my thread on topic. It was mentioned you could, by someone. I don't know how, I don't use that stuff I test by hand. I firmly believe it is possible, because Dis will test ever part of that car if it has a user capable of the task. Since guys called BS on it I would love someone to show how to do it.
Since I am asking for a favor a link is provided.
http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/e3...bearing-failure-preventative-maintenance.html
 

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In the GT1, do you activate with the engine running, not running, or can you do either? I may activate them before the oil drain and then pull them and bench test and clean. I may also try to test the harness from the DME while activating to see what kind of signal it is. Just brain storming right now...
 

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I did the DIS test on these two solenoids and found one didn't click when actuated. I plan on freeing it up some day, but it's not a big worry as I don't have the nerve or the opportunity to do 0.9g in corners.

Here's how you get to it:
Run SHORT TEST.
Hit green right hand arrow (GRHA) to get to Diagnosis Fault System Selection window.
Double click 1200 Engine Control to get it into the middle window and then the TRANSFER button to get it listed in the bottom window.
Hit GRHA to get to Diagnosis Test Plan window.
Select "=>Digital motor electronics dms" and hit GRHA.
DIS searches for and identifies DME.
Hit GRHA. New screen shows 1. Fault Symptoms, 2. Function Test, 3. Service Functions, and 4. Expert Mode
Select Expert Mode and then GRHA.
Select Component Activation and then GRHA.
A two page list of componebts comes up.
Select "Activation, oil circuit changeover valve, left" (or right) and GRHA.
Follow instructions to activate solenoids. There's an audible click when they switch.
 

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I'm pretty sure there's no PWM involved. WDS seems to be saying it's just switching:

Engine Oil Circuit
Due to the sports design of the M5 and Z8 higher cornering speeds are possible and thus also increased transverse acceleration of up to 1.2 g (1.2 times the earth's acceleration). Due to these high transverse acceleration levels the engine oil would be forced into areas of the engine facing the outside of a curve and would collect there particularly in the valve cover and oil pan area.

For this reason, a special oil system with a triple oil pump is fitted on the S62.

The main oil pump serves the purpose of generating the necessary engine oil pressure and thus engine lubrication. Depending on the current driving status, two auxiliary oil pumps convey the oil from the collection areas to the intake of the main oil pump. Each auxiliary oil pump features two intake lines that lead into the right-hand and left-hand sections of the oil pan. Special changeover valves open the corresponding intake line as required. One-sided oil intake cuts in as from a transverse acceleration of about 0.9 g. The signal is transferred via the CAN-bus from the dynamic stability control DSC to the DME control unit which then activates the corresponding changeover valves.

When driving straight ahead or when the transverse acceleration limit is not reached, both auxiliary pumps convey oil via the intake lines to the intake area of the main oil pump.

When the transverse acceleration limit is exceeded (approx. 0.9 g) while cornering, the corresponding changeover valve switches such that the auxiliary pumps convey oil from the valve cover and oil pan area facing the outside of the curve to the main pump..
 
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