BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have experience with using an Oil Extractor rather than doing a change up on ramps the conventional way?

All opinions welcomed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,412 Posts
I've been doing it this way for years. Don't have any data to back things up, but it sure is easy. 20 minutes, hands clean. It's so easy I usually do my oil about every 2K miles so I figure that makes up for a few drops left in the oil pan.
 
  • Like
Reactions: M55555

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
For a while I was sceptical of them. Then I used one to remove the oil, followed by removing the sump plug to get the last of the oil out. I did this a good few times. What came out of the drain hole was always insignificant so I'm quite happy to use an extractor now.
Add in the reduced mess and time saved and it all good!

Only little thing is that you don't need to get under the car anymore, so you miss the opportunity to have a general quick look at things under there. Not a problem if you look after you car anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,605 Posts
I don't find oil changes on the M5 a messy job at all. Easiest car ever to perform an oil change on. Some people though over tighten the oil plug and strip the threads. If you are not the careful type, the oil extractor may be for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For a while I was sceptical of them. Then I used one to remove the oil, followed by removing the sump plug to get the last of the oil out. I did this a good few times. What came out of the drain hole was always insignificant so I'm quite happy to use an extractor now.
Add in the reduced mess and time saved and it all good!

Only little thing is that you don't need to get under the car anymore, so you miss the opportunity to have a general quick look at things under there. Not a problem if you look after you car anyway.
How much oil are we talking? a few 100ml?
Any residual sludge or other bits that might remain where normal change would flush out?
Which Extractor model do you use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
I'd say a few drops, 10ml or so. I'm quite fussy about these things and what's left really is not worth considering, especially in 6.5 litres of fresh oil.

I use a Sealey TP69 extractor, here's a ebay-UK link: TP69 DRAINAGE OIL EXTRACTION FLUID EXTRACTOR SYPHON NEW on eBay (end time 10-Apr-11 12:32:56 BST)

Regarding sludge, it's hard to say. The best way to remove/check it is to remove the lower oilpan.
The drain plug is M12 giving a hole that's a good 10mm in diameter, so oil bourne bits will come out easier. However, I'm not sure that the heavier bits would come out as there's a raised lip for the threaded portion, with a notch in it. The notch and the extractor pipe offer a similar passage, so in that respect there's little difference. Also, sludge tends to settle and collect, so I doubt much actually gets drained. As I said, removal of the lower oil pan is the way to go (but you need a new metal gasket); might be worth doing this once to satisfy ones worries (something I intend doing when I next change my oil). Incidentally, a number of people have discovered far more worrying items than sludge - metal and plastic chain guide bits, bolts etc!

Have a search for lower oil pan removal and repairing stripped oil sump plug thread (time-sert) for some interesting reading.

HTH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,355 Posts
Any residual sludge or other bits that might remain where normal change would flush out?
If you change your oil hot as you are suppose to the "sludge" (should not be there anyway) would likely be in suspension with the oil. If you did the drain way every 4th time that would remove it anyway. I could see how sucking the oil out may actually get more crud (should not be there) than a drain would.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,589 Posts
Mercedes does this as a factory oil change procedure. I've been doing it for quite some time with literally ZERO sludging. Proper OCI's and hot oil changes (along with the occasional ATF flush). As Ger mentioned, if you use a quality oil extractor, you'll have minimal amounts of oil left (I'd say 10-20ml max) after you suck out the old oil. I use a Jabsco electronic extractor designed for boats with giant sumps. This is exactly as good as the traditional method.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
769 Posts
I started using it after a mechanic stripped the oil pan bolt. Since then I have used an oil extractor... cleaner and easier, IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I also use an oil extractor. It works very well. I also use it to extract whatever oil is left in the oil filter housing after I remove the oil filter. IMO results are very good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
I use a Pela 6000 on all my vehicles. I love it. On my TDI wagon I have a 3/16" aluminum skid plat that I dont like removing, so out the dipstick it goes!

I haven't had my Beast very long, but I used it when I changed the oil. Its soooo much easier. I stick in the dipstick tube, pump it like a madman, walk away. When I come back I pump it a few more time to make sure I got it all. I also use it to vacuum out the filter housing.

I dont like having to keep stock of the oil drain plug washers, so I figure every five or so changes (I lose my baggies), I use the actual drain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Does anyone have experience with using an Oil Extractor rather than doing a change up on ramps the conventional way?

All opinions welcomed?
I have one, however, takes way too long to just suck all the oil out. Rather just drain it from the bottom and ensure all the oil and particles are out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So some people actually using the very machine id been looking at good as I get discount on Sealey although the 9L Draper Man/Air ones are also in contention.

@ Ger thanks for the info the reason I actually thought about using one was indeed based on the fact it's my first change since owning the car and I dont want to blag the use of the company garage for an hour only to find the drain bolts stripped and then a whole lot of trouble ensues, it may have full BMWDSH but does not mean some spotty apprentice has done things correctly lol

@ Sailor24 In my experience I would have thought it would remain in suspension also, but speaking to an engineer at work he thought the opposite and hence asking for real world opinions.

So in my mind to date I've thought about using it to drain the oil and filter housing, lowering the coolant as I believe I may have a Thermo on the way out (72C max :grrrrr:) and dont want to total flush, removing as much PS fluid as I can from system before replacing a few weepy pipes.

And best of all it should be way cleaner than before especially given my home made Drain tray is only about 5L!! :thumbsup:

Johny
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,355 Posts
@ Sailor24 In my experience I would have thought it would remain in suspension also, but speaking to an engineer at work he thought the opposite and hence asking for real world opinions.
I would be really curious why he says it does not stay in suspension. It may explain something else that I am working on that is not working the way I anticipated.Two analogies I am thinking of are a snow globe. You shake it and the little bits float around a long time then sink. Lava lamp where heat raises the bloob in the oil . I guess you would need to know if the sludge expands more than the oil, yup pretty sure I don't know that.ouich
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,605 Posts
I would be really curious why he says it does not stay in suspension. It may explain something else that I am working on that is not working the way I anticipated.Two analogies I am thinking of are a snow globe. You shake it and the little bits float around a long time then sink. Lava lamp where heat raises the bloob in the oil . I guess you would need to know if the sludge expands more than the oil, yup pretty sure I don't know that.ouich
Some sludge could possibly be attached to parts of the motor or trapped in smaller passages and a good flushing of the engine with ATF or other engine flushing agents can get them loose. Either methods mentioned here can't really do anything about that. I used to flush my other car regularly before an oil change. Does anyone do that in their S62? I'm worried about seals getting damaged.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,589 Posts
Some sludge could possibly be attached to parts of the motor or trapped in smaller passages and a good flushing of the engine with ATF or other engine flushing agents can get them loose. Either methods mentioned here can't really do anything about that. I used to flush my other car regularly before an oil change. Does anyone do that in their S62? I'm worried about seals getting damaged.
I mentioned it a few posts up. I do it every 30k miles. Pour in 1qt 200mi or so before an oil change and use an extractor to change the oil when it's hot.

I use this one: Jabsco Flat Tank Oil Changer System, Model# 17860-1012 | Oil Extractors | Northern Tool + Equipment
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,355 Posts
I do it every 30k miles. Pour in 1qt 200mi
ATF or a cleaner ? If cleaner which one? I have way to much colour shortly after an oil change. I was going to use ATF but am a bit concerned that it is about a 10 weight oil maybe even less. It flows up here in the cold when no other will, maybe that is a good thing don't know.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,589 Posts
ATF or a cleaner ? If cleaner which one? I have way to much colour shortly after an oil change. I was going to use ATF but am a bit concerned that it is about a 10 weight oil maybe even less. It flows up here in the cold when no other will, maybe that is a good thing don't know.

ATF. I use the Castrol Dextron/MerconIII blend.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top