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Took delivery last week and only have 150 mile on the car. I have better luck starting out in 2nd gear most of the time. Shifting from 1st to 2nd is a difficult thing, at least for me. I am not new to a stick been driving sticks over 20 years .
With only 150 miles under my belt likely I am not giving myself enough practice but I wpuld be interested in others initial experiences.
 

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A little stiff between shifts initially, usually moreso doing a 2-3. Give her twice the mileaage and it should loosen up fine.
 

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Just make sure you work to ensure the clutch is fully engaged before you have a lot of throttle in. In many cars, you can get by with letting the clutch slip until the tranny and engine are synchronized. The clutch is so much stronger than the engine, it rapidly pulls the engine down to the right speed, regardless of how much throttle you have in.

In the M5, however, you have 400hp. The clutch cannot absorb this if it is slipping. You'll read lots on this board about burnt-out clutches.

Just use a light throttle foot until your left foot is all the way up. With practice you can do this VERY quickly. You do NOT have to sacrifice performance. In fact you can DROP the clutch in a 1-2 shift provided you didn't accelerate the engine FIRST - and you'll chirp the wheels. It is OK to have wheel slip (from a standpoint of not overloading the clutch) but you MUST NOT slip the clutch under full power.


Of course, for more normal driving, you will "feather" the throttle and clutch over a second or so.
 

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I use first from a standing start, but if rolling at all I'll go from second. The car pulls quite nicely from 1500 on up, no significant clutch slip required.
 

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I noticed when I first started driving my old 540i that you had to get the clutch release just right. With the M5 the difference is greater.

Practice releasing the clutch until your muscle memory is correct. The shifts to get looser the more miles you have on the car, but you'll burn the clutch out first if you don't have the release point down.

I have driven quite a few standard cars, and the BMW clutch does take some getting used to.

Vapour.
 

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Tom,
The PERFECT way to change gears (on any car) is to match the revs of the motor with those of the gearbox (which are set by the revs of the final drive train,i.e. the tires).
You have to do the following: accelerate normally to say 4,000rpm, watch the speedometer and see how fast you`re going, change gear and stay at the same speed watching the new rpm (will be around 3,500). Well, this is the rpm you should have accelerated to with the clutch pressed BEFORE letting the higher gear get in.
With race cars it is easier to learn how to do this "by ear" because of the louder exaust, but the M5 is so hush (especially with the windows up and the music), that you have to look at the rev counter more closely to really learn this by heart.
I recommend you first try this WITHOUT the "sport-mode" accelerator setting. Once you master it, press the button and you`ll be an expert.
Good luck.
 

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The post by greg gets it right. While driving slow to avgerage in speed, I have jerky 1-2, and some times 2-3, shifts if I throttle in too much before clutch is out. If rpms are too high, the diff between engine speed and car speed will produce drivetrain bucking.

Error on the side of clutch out first then adding throttle; the engine is more passive. Even if I am slow with throttle the shift is OK. The shorter the lag the smother the shift.

Again, this is an issue if driving fairly liesurely. I have no problem if I go zip off at a 70% or more effort.

Terry
 
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