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I admire your dedication you persistent mofo! Keep it up, and once she is finally brought to life again, make that bch scream and wail on the daily and never look back.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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when I did my valve spring, I did use the special locking tool.
However, I also questioned the need for it.
It seemed to me that it only locked the two helical gears together and held them so that you cannot damage the gears rather than timing.
Because you had to do the timing anyway afterwards.
So if you were careful enough, you could potentially get away without the special tool.

I would sell you mine since I paid 500 usd for it but I plan to keep this car and I'm most likely going to need the tool again whenever the next issue comes up.

If you plan to keep your car, maybe it's wise to just buy the tool.
 

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Hello flacoramos,

Good Q! While tearing down, found all timing based on locking crank and all cam-shafts. VANOS retarded (most clockwise at adjustment screws), and ?? want a senior member to back me up, but should be good!

I have not yet assembled, but believe this tool, SST 115 352 would make it easier to keep timing chains oriented when assembly head. With S85, timing chains must be installed early in the assembly phase as there is no front timing chain cover.

Looking forward to comments.

PS: Pulled cams without SST set 11 5 241/242/243 . Planned by load on valve springs and release slowly. Worked perfect for 3/4 cams......bank-2 exhaust decided it liked its position even without a retainer and "popped" loose at cam drive.....grrrr, but should be okay!

Worst new I had today was when I pulled bank-1 head......this car may have gone for a swim b/4 I received motor?

P
 

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when I did my valve spring, I did use the special locking tool.
However, I also questioned the need for it.
It seemed to me that it only locked the two helical gears together and held them so that you cannot damage the gears rather than timing.
Because you had to do the timing anyway afterwards.
So if you were careful enough, you could potentially get away without the special tool.

I would sell you mine since I paid 500 usd for it but I plan to keep this car and I'm most likely going to need the tool again whenever the next issue comes up.

If you plan to keep your car, maybe it's wise to just buy the tool.
I always justify buying the right tools since I DIY. Just wondering what's really required. I have the 115 370 VANOS gear locking tool, I bough it last year. It sounds like that is what you are referring to. I was asking about a different tool, 115 352, which looks like this.

935171


It seems like it's only job is to hold up the chain perhaps while you remove or reinstall the cylinder head. I think I could do that with some tig rod. It does seems like the cams can be removed very slowly by backing off the bolts progressively.

What about removing the valve keepers and compressing the spring. Seems like BMW has a set of special tool that attaches to the cylinder head but I'm interested to hear what others have used, especially if you only replaced on valve spring. I don't have a bench mounted spring compressor.
 

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I always justify buying the right tools since I DIY. Just wondering what's really required. I have the 115 370 VANOS gear locking tool, I bough it last year. It sounds like that is what you are referring to. I was asking about a different tool, 115 352, which looks like this.

View attachment 935171

It seems like it's only job is to hold up the chain perhaps while you remove or reinstall the cylinder head. I think I could do that with some tig rod. It does seems like the cams can be removed very slowly by backing off the bolts progressively.

What about removing the valve keepers and compressing the spring. Seems like BMW has a set of special tool that attaches to the cylinder head but I'm interested to hear what others have used, especially if you only replaced on valve spring. I don't have a bench mounted spring compressor.
I didn't use that tool, I used the vanos gear locking tool.
I ended up making my own handle- spring compressor while i had a long set of needle nose pliers holding the valve from the side, (via throttle body port, search for my thread on this forum you'll see some photos)
I also put the piston to TDC just to be on the safe side.
 

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Thanks, I have a new set of valve stem seals so I was thinking about tearing down the cylinder head to do those, but I'm gonna need a spring compressor to do 40 valves. Which then makes me think about replacing all the springs since the stock ones seem to fatigue far earlier than they ever should. I'm a bit scared to learn how expensive the BMW spring compressor and valve keeper tools are...
 

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Hello gmtegear,

Just pulled my valve seals today. 40 of them....WOW!

pic below and can also send pic of "basic" valve spring compressor I have used on my Toyota 2zz-ge that also works on the S85

Mr. P
 

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Nice. I have the same Harbor Freight pickset and magnetic tray! Please send the picture of the valve spring compressor and part number for the tool. Maybe you can upload a photo of how your valves look? Do you have a machine shop that you are sending this to?
 

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Hello gmtegear,

I will send photo and item number of the valve spring compressor soon. Attached are some pics of my head/valves, but my engine is/was a little "wonky" as it sat for 5 years and must have been exposed to some elements. It/they (pics) are NOT representative of what to expect from a normal engine. I will most likely have to replace some valves, but others can be re-cut and heads are salvageable with seat and possibly stem guide service.

I have a local machine shop that should have no problem with the heads. For the block, I am still checking but found a place out of state that has experience with the Alusil bores.

PS: Some of the Harbor Freight tools do work well! I even purchased Yukon boxes you may see in some pic backgrounds.

Mr. P
 

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Thanks Mr.P. Did you need to use the special BMW valve seat keeper tools? I saw those called out in the factory procedure, it doesn't look that unique but I'm thinking maybe it saves a lot of hassle on re-installation of the keepers. The valves look like there was a bit of oil bypass, that is why I have been looking to strip my heads on my other engine that I've pulled. Did you use some special blasting media to clean the valves or just chemicals? I think you said you were in the Detroit area, Livernois Motorsports is a well known engine builder in Dearborn. I've been there a few times before. You may want to contact them, they probably have experience with Alusil, BMW uses it in their other engines, at the end of the day it's not that difficult to work with. I believe one of the critical things is to have the surface finish correct, they have a world class machine shop.

Pricing is listed here for their services:
 

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Hello gmtegear,

I have not yet assembled heads, it will be a few weeks, but I see nothing special about the keepers other than they are quite small. Most probably, the machine shop will install for me at they did with the Toyota/Yamaha head when I had them refurbish valves and seats.

As for valve clean-up, I may get some flack, but stand behind my procedure: I taped the valve stems with electrical tape, inserted into the chuck on a cordless drill, then used a wire wheeled grinder (brass or soft steel fine) and spun each valve in the drill while also using wire bushes on grinder. This cleans all surface carbon, and for me rust/mud, without any surface damage to the harder steel valves.

Attached are pics of the valve spring compressor I have and have used sucessfully. OTC item 4572.
NOTE: Valve removal much easier using the mallet and socket technique (Find socket that fits over retainer around the keepers. Add 6-12" extension. Then with a with a good tap using a heavy mallet the retainer will drop and the keepers will fall out. There is some technique with hope hard to "tap", but I only had to use the OTC compressor for 2 of the 40 valves (only when 1 keeper would come out and the other stayed in place).

Hope this helps.

As for engine bore, I have it on temporary hold as I just received a second engine and hoping for better luck!

Mr. P
 

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I think the drill method for cleaning valve is very popular and fine. I was thinking that soaking in some chemical formula may be a bit quicker since there are so many valves. I've used Berryman's chem dip on other parts before which worked well for me.

It sounds like the OTC 4572 worked fine, but perhaps a bit slower right? It's a very reasonably priced tool, I'm glad to hear it did the job, I may order one of those.
 

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Hello gmtegear,

It, the OTC 4572, is a large, unwieldy, and very cumbersome tool, but it works. You have to find ways to support the head, but again, it works. I do not build engines professionally. It is more of a hobby and knowing that the engines I build meet my standards as well as the factory specs. I take way too much time on my projects, but the end result is a perfect engine and when I look at it, I know everything about it, and it will last a LONG time. If there is a failure, I have no one to complain to, even when outsourcing work, I select carefully and double check what is received.

Example of my detail attached: A Toyota/Yamaha 2ZZ-GE that I refurbished, bolt-to-bolt, from a crusty hulk to finished and installed on my MR2/S.

Thanks again for the comments,

Mr .P
 

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