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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys
Looking at doing a rod bearing change and have found the ARP bearings only cost £190, has anyone else used them or does everyone just pay the extra and get BE bearings?
Also any help into directing me to the cheapest place to buy the bearings and bolts would be appreciated.
I've seen it's common practice to replace the vanos oil feed line whilst doing this job, either any other work I should look at doing whilst doing a rod bearing change?
Fyi, my cars a 2006 e60 m5 with about 58k on the clock.
The engine currently has a misfire on cyl 2, could this be caused by worn bearings? I've swapped over plugs and coils and will be testing to see if the misfire moves on thurs before compression testing (fingers crossed compression isnt down!) The rod bearing job I was hoping to do on the back of any other repairs required but mostly pricing things up etc. I'm off work at the moment due to this cornavirus lock down so hoping to get as much done as I can whilst I'm not building cars at work!
Help and advice is greatly appreciated.
Fyi. I build cars for a living and am a fully qualified mechanic and have plenty of experience working on cars and engines but advice is always good!
 

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ARP doesn’t make bearings, so I’m not sure what you mean comparing BE to ARP bearings.

While I was in there, I changed the vanos line, wear parts ( chain guides and spring), vanos filter and I upgraded the oil squirters. I also added a second oil drain plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My mistake! I meant ACL!
I was planning on doing the vanos line.
I will inspect the chain guides (I know my old e39 guides started chomping themselves so will see how they are on the e60!)
Is it common to upgrade the oil squirted? Any recommendation on brand etc? Also how easy did you add a 2nd drain plug? Did you just drill a hole and tap it for a plug? Is this required?
Thanks for your response!
 

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ahhh. I see. I used ACL.

The factory oil squirters were improved through the life of the engine. Model year ‘08 if I recall correctly. The only option is from BMW.

I welded a bung on for the second drain plug. This was also a change for later models. It allows for a more thorough oil change. Obviously this could improve the engine life by ensuring more old oil is removed during an oil change
 

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I went with ACL bearings. I got them for $170 on amazon from BimmerBoost. I also have an extra Vanos hose I'd be willing to sell. I did not change mine out because I was on a tight schedule.
 

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Since you will be doing the vanos line, you will have fan out and have to remove the water pump pulley, you should also change the water pump. You will have better access to the vanos banjo bolt if you remove the top radiator hose, so you will have to drain the radiator anyways. Since you work on cars all the time it doesn't make sense for you not to. I opted to leave the thermostat alone since it is quite easy to replace later from the top of the engine and getting to it doesn't require that much work to remove.

Since you will have to drop the subframe to remove the oil pan, it's a good time to either replace the whole alternator, or remove the old one and replace the voltage regulator. With the subframe out, you will have the best access possible. The regulators seem to go bad by 100k miles anyways and it's a $40 part. New Valeo alternators here in the US are like $200, which is quite cheap given everything else on these cars are many times that (it has a new voltage regulator in it).

Since you have to remove the belts you have to remove the idler pulley, it's best to replace the belts and proactively replace the idler pulley (the febi ones are quite cheap like $20) as well as the 2 tensioner pulleys. This is simple and cheap maintenance since old worn bearings on these pulleys case squealing and whirring noises.

Something I didn't originally do when I had it all a part which I should have done is to pull the radiator and clean up and redo the orings for the 4 VANOS solenoids. Don't try replacing these without pulling the radiator.
 

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Since you will be doing the vanos line, you will have fan out and have to remove the water pump pulley, you should also change the water pump. You will have better access to the vanos banjo bolt if you remove the top radiator hose, so you will have to drain the radiator anyways. Since you work on cars all the time it doesn't make sense for you not to. I opted to leave the thermostat alone since it is quite easy to replace later from the top of the engine and getting to it doesn't require that much work to remove.

Since you will have to drop the subframe to remove the oil pan, it's a good time to either replace the whole alternator, or remove the old one and replace the voltage regulator. With the subframe out, you will have the best access possible. The regulators seem to go bad by 100k miles anyways and it's a $40 part. New Valeo alternators here in the US are like $200, which is quite cheap given everything else on these cars are many times that (it has a new voltage regulator in it).

Since you have to remove the belts you have to remove the idler pulley, it's best to replace the belts and proactively replace the idler pulley (the febi ones are quite cheap like $20) as well as the 2 tensioner pulleys. This is simple and cheap maintenance since old worn bearings on these pulleys case squealing and whirring noises.

Something I didn't originally do when I had it all a part which I should have done is to pull the radiator and clean up and redo the orings for the 4 VANOS solenoids. Don't try replacing these without pulling the radiator.
That's definitely a "while you're in there" list.
 

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I forgot to mention engine mounts.

Perhaps with the exception of the vanos actuators if OP is content with the actuators as is, those are all things that should be done on on these cars especially his which is turning 15 years old. Good preventative maintenance on these cars are less common that mods people do. For a fully qualified mechanic these are easy. I recommend pulling the radiator since the amount of dirt, dead insects, grass, twigs, seeds, and leaves and dirt was a bit astounding to me. Ironically the one car that I knew was parked outside for a bit was better than the other car where the owner said he kept it in the garage.

I wouldn’t be surprised if a car with 58k miles is still running the original coolant.
 

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I had mine done with ACL HX bearings, and genuine BMW bolts.
Also changed was the vanos line, engine mounts, spark plugs (they were due).
New sump gasket and oil line seals from BMW.
Filled with Fuchs Titan Supersyn. 10w60 - was cheap from opie oils.
After 500 miles, new oil and filter - Motul x8100 10w60.
 

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If your in UK, just buy them from rebuild.uk. Here is a link to their page.



BTW, I would always recommend buying ACL mixed shells and ARP bolts. Look at this chart for details.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Hello M5tog,

Watching and interested in you service.

In my humble opinion, mis-fire is not related to bearings, espeically if it can be located to a single cylinder (#2 for this post). Fuel, Air, Spark allows first. Next is timing and compression.

Wishing you god luck and please keep posting..... and send pics!

Mr. P
 

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Yep, just finished mine with ACL HX bearings and ARP bolts. Did not do the Vanos line since PO had it, and the HP pump replaced about 10K miles earlier. I did replace the little filter under the HP pump though and glad i did. There were a couple small pieces of copper in it and it was partially clogged. Lots of thing you can do when you have the sub-frame down and the list can get pretty long. I also did my clutch (SMG) and, in the process, a complete refresh of the transmission. wow, what a difference that made!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the recommendations guys, I'll probably do a few jobs down there!
Chasing this cyl 2 misfire, I haven't swapped the coils and plugs round yet, but I did do a compression test as I have everything off and thought it was easier to check now than put it all back together and see that the misfire didn't move..

Anyway my compression tester isn't holding pressure and slowly leaks and I didn't have a 2nd set of eyes, so I had to face the gauge towards me and look through the gap between the windscreen and bonnet, so these are about figures rather than 100% accurate but gives me a good enough idea..
Dry Wet
Cyl 1. 115 125-130
Cyl 2. 110 125-130
Cyl 3. 115 125
Cyl 4. 110 125-130
Cyl 5. 115 Not tested
Cyl 6. 115 130
Cyl 7. 120 130
Cyl 8. 120 125
Cyl 9. 115 Not tested
Cyl 10. 115 Not tested

I didn't bother wet testing all cyl as I had other arrangements, but I got enough information from my tests anyway.

I assume these results are what's to be expected as all my cylinders were within a respectable range and as previously mentioned, weren't completely accurate, but I didn't get a particularly low reading which is good.

Also my car has obviously been tested by the previous owner as there was some clean (at first worried I had a rocker gasket leak as i jad on my e39, but noticed it was clean so not run through the engine!) oil down some of the plug holes, more on bank 2, which I think contributed to cyl 7 and 8 having a reading of 120 dry as i expect some oil left ran into the bores once I removed the plugs.

Anyway I counted that as a win as I think I've ruled out a major problem with the engine itself.

Leads me to believe I must be looking at a spark or fuel problem.

Will fit cyl 2 coil and plug into cyl 3 spot and for everything back together and see if it moves.

If it doesn't then I'll assume I'm looking at injector or maybe the ionic module.

Will keep this thread updated!
 
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