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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After all the past threads on the lack of a Bentley Manual for an M5, I've decided that I may have to buy the e39 manual that covers the other models. What I'm particularly interested in is the Electrical and Wiring diagram section but I'd also know what other areas of the two models are similar or completely different.

Does anyone know how similar the M5 electricals are to the 540, and would the Bentley manual for the standard e39 help or just get me in more trouble. For example, I want to review the CPS circuit to see just how this signal is used. Would the standard e39 wiring diagrams be applicable to the M5 design?

And, whatever happened to this discussion? Anybody ever hear back?


http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=98917&highlight=bentley+service+manual
 

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The Bentley manual doesn't cover the S62 engine, it does have all the other 'TU' engines that might help in understanding your questions on the variable cam timing controls.

Post 76 has the files you can download, also try putting TIS in the search.
 

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After all the past threads on the lack of a Bentley Manual for an M5, I've decided that I may have to buy the e39 manual that covers the other models. What I'm particularly interested in is the Electrical and Wiring diagram section but I'd also know what other areas of the two models are similar or completely different.

Does anyone know how similar the M5 electricals are to the 540, and would the Bentley manual for the standard e39 help or just get me in more trouble. For example, I want to review the CPS circuit to see just how this signal is used. Would the standard e39 wiring diagrams be applicable to the M5 design?
I have the Bentley manual for the E39 and it's useful as a guide to most of the chassis including the chassis electrical system. It's a clean miss on the engine and ECU, but you already know that. For the money it's useful. I have a TIS as well and I use it more than the Bentley.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think I will go ahead and get the standard e39 manual. Anything has to be better than what I have now; nothing.

Although I'm still under warranty, it runs out next year and I'd like to do my own work if I'm going to keep the M5 long term.

In 22 years, this is the first BMW that I have not had a dedicated manual for.
 

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BMW does not want you to repair your own car. They are trying to force a sole-source service through your dealership and hoping you junk your car every 7 years to buy new.

Their subassembly parts program, limited service literature and dealer-only service tools are part of a concerted effort to close opportunities on indys and backyard mechanics. This will eventually destroy the market for BMW classic cars, as they become unserviceable. It is already happening to impressive V12 machines, as resale value is sagging.

Their in-your-face arrogance strategy is eventually going to lose them some loyalists. The serviceable BMW era is over.:sad2:
 

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BMW does not want you to repair your own car. They are trying to force a sole-source service through your dealership and hoping you junk your car every 7 years to buy new.

Their subassembly parts program, limited service literature and dealer-only service tools are part of a concerted effort to close opportunities on indys and backyard mechanics. This will eventually destroy the market for BMW classic cars, as they become unserviceable. It is already happening to impressive V12 machines, as resale value is sagging.

Their in-your-face arrogance strategy is eventually going to lose them some loyalists. The serviceable BMW era is over.:sad2:
And they are not alone. Every modern car is or will be like that. The only thing you can do soon is to top up with fuel and windshield washer fluid. Look at that "thing" called Audi A2. Just a little hatch to do those things.
 

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I think I will go ahead and get the standard e39 manual. Anything has to be better than what I have now; nothing.

Although I'm still under warranty, it runs out next year and I'd like to do my own work if I'm going to keep the M5 long term.

In 22 years, this is the first BMW that I have not had a dedicated manual for.
The Bentley in conjunction with ETK and TIS is the best available.
 

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And they are not alone. Every modern car is or will be like that. The only thing you can do soon is to top up with fuel and windshield washer fluid. Look at that "thing" called Audi A2. Just a little hatch to do those things.
Will be, maybe someday. Is, I'd say no. Your examples seem skewed toward German products.

GM & Ford still sell internal components to affordably repairing most of their cars. If you want to buy a bearing for a tranny or differential, it's generally available separately at a good price. They also offer robust service manuals and electronic diagnostic tools at affordable prices. The only exceptions I've seen so far involve internal drivetrain parts sourced from arrogant mfrs in Germany. Go figure. GM leveraged ZF into offering internal parts for most trannys. They didn't follow MB, Audi, VW and BMW lead. Thank goodness some drivetrain parts come from other countries.

The domestic manufacturers still appear anxious to openly cooperate with owners, indys, racers and backyard mechanics by offering parts and competitive services. They seem to be content to win business thru competitive services, instead of waging war with nasty tactics.
 
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