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I’ve been driving my current 6MT clutch for the last 132,000 miles — track days, airstrips, and freeways.
 

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Happy to find this thread as 6MT info is hard to find, so thanks for putting this together. My 07 M6 has 111k on the stock clutch, no signs of slippage yet, we'll see how far it goes
 

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I had made a gear ratio calculator sheet for the M5 awhile back when shopping differential options.
931915

The sheet is fully customizable, meaning you can change the redline and use it for other vehicles. Once the redline is changed the speeds will blank out. For this sheet I made 4 separate tabs, two for SMG (one of which with the 3.91) and two for the 6 speed car (one with 3.91).

The tire diameters I got off of tirerack.com, however I also used a radar gun to get my exact speed at 3,000RPM in 7th with the SMG. Turns out the tire diameters are slightly different, and I have corrected the diameter to match the speed at the given RPM down to 1/10th of a kilometer per hour (it wasn't off by much). Everything is precise. Top speed in 7th using drag calculations for and SMG car is about 7600RPM in 7th, right about 200mph.

931916

I used a dyno sheet to generate some horsepower numbers. Once entered they appear on the top portion of the sheet. So if you're able to up your midrange power you can see where it will make an impact when shifting gears. The 1-2 shift are calculated RPM's based on the ratios and engine speeds as to where the RPM will land each time a gear change is made at redline, so you can also see on the sheet how much maximum power you make at the RPM which the change is made.

I'll have to get a dropbox link for the sheet if anyone is interested in it at all. I was still working on it about a year ago before giving up. I had some other plans to make it even more useful...
 

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E60 M5 Gear Ratio Worksheet

Here we go, available for download.
Change everything from the ratios to the final drive, tire diameter etc. Everything else shows up automatically. The green RPM numbers correspond to where the next gear drops to when it does a gear change. Even changing the diff, the gearbox will still run without shift points changing, the only change is the speeds at which they happen.

If you're wondering why your speedometer is off, and how it can be so far off... it is. As I mentioned I ran the speedometer vs. a radar unit and it was off by 3.7mph(6km/h) at 60, and gets worse as speeds rise.

E60 M5 Top Speed Video
Top speed video, you can see that the video starts at 2500 RPM in 7th at around 111km/h (on my car 111km/h is 106km/h) which means the sheet is accurate. In this case 3 times that would be 7500RPM and 318km/h however the car shows 339km/h without ever reaching the mathematical 318km/h and likely only reached around 314km/h.
 

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^ Since this thread got revived...


Any one considering the Spec Twin Disk (when clutch replacement day comes)?
http://www.specclutch.com/cars/BMW/M6/2007/Super_Twin
This was what I did for an upgraded clutch and LTFW. I’m almost 165,000 miles now and 8,000 miles on the clutch.

 

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This was what I did for an upgraded clutch and LTFW. I’m almost 165,000 miles now and 8,000 miles on the clutch.

Yup I will be doing the same next year but kinda thinking about just getting the fx250..
 

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Also just bought the Z3 shifter with the new bushing and other hardware with it. Hopefully I can do a diy on it one of these days.
 

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Also just bought the Z3 shifter with the new bushing and other hardware with it. Hopefully I can do a diy on it one of these days.
I really like that set up. It’s notchy, but that’s what it’s all about.
 

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I have 157,000 miles on car and 50,000 miles on clutch, which will never wear out since my only high performance driving is on track with little to no shifting.
Drive like an old man on public roads shift at 2500 to 3000 rpm get 19.5 mpg in summer with 10-60 oil, much less in winter due to thermostat holding water temp below 162 F

My best car control comes from left foot braking, thus i prefer to do NCM in 3rd gear only, still plenty fast with no safety equipment other than helmet.
I do not know if rev limiter has been removed, but try to keep it under 8400 rpm. Motor does not mind, it was replaced by previous owner with a Troy Jeup rebuild 50,000 miles ago, burns no oil between changes.

Autocross same deal but just keep it in second gear, however tires get blown away at 6000 rpm when in M dynamic mode and thus contend with tank slappers on occasional bumpy courses (with acorns LOL), thus keep all nannies on.
Bonus is the hot (DSC induced) rear brakes help keep rear tires warm on cold days, thus rear tires much warmer than fronts.

Miata driver told me the m5 is an amazing car to beat his time on a very tight course
 

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I have 157,000 miles on car and 50,000 miles on clutch, which will never wear out since my only high performance driving is on track with little to no shifting.
Drive like an old man on public roads shift at 2500 to 3000 rpm get 19.5 mpg in summer with 10-60 oil, much less in winter due to thermostat holding water temp below 162 F

My best car control comes from left foot braking, thus i prefer to do NCM in 3rd gear only, still plenty fast with no safety equipment other than helmet.
I do not know if rev limiter has been removed, but try to keep it under 8400 rpm. Motor does not mind, it was replaced by previous owner with a Troy Jeup rebuild 50,000 miles ago, burns no oil between changes.

Autocross same deal but just keep it in second gear, however tires get blown away at 6000 rpm when in M dynamic mode and thus contend with tank slappers on occasional bumpy courses (with acorns LOL), thus keep all nannies on.
Bonus is the hot (DSC induced) rear brakes help keep rear tires warm on cold days, thus rear tires much warmer than fronts.

Miata driver told me the m5 is an amazing car to beat his time on a very tight course
Nice, do you have a Jeup stroker?
 

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I have 157,000 miles on car and 50,000 miles on clutch, which will never wear out since my only high performance driving is on track with little to no shifting.
Drive like an old man on public roads shift at 2500 to 3000 rpm get 19.5 mpg in summer with 10-60 oil, much less in winter due to thermostat holding water temp below 162 F

My best car control comes from left foot braking, thus i prefer to do NCM in 3rd gear only, still plenty fast with no safety equipment other than helmet.
I do not know if rev limiter has been removed, but try to keep it under 8400 rpm. Motor does not mind, it was replaced by previous owner with a Troy Jeup rebuild 50,000 miles ago, burns no oil between changes.

Autocross same deal but just keep it in second gear, however tires get blown away at 6000 rpm when in M dynamic mode and thus contend with tank slappers on occasional bumpy courses (with acorns LOL), thus keep all nannies on.
Bonus is the hot (DSC induced) rear brakes help keep rear tires warm on cold days, thus rear tires much warmer than fronts.

Miata driver told me the m5 is an amazing car to beat his time on a very tight course
What's your oil change interval?

A working thermostat will only keep temps at or above its opening temp. No idea what you mean by winter temp being different.
 

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What's your oil change interval?

A working thermostat will only keep temps at or above its opening temp. No idea what you mean by winter temp being different.
Not true
I tested a new OEM thermostat in a pot of water it started opening at 160 F and was fully open at 185 F it is analog not an on off solenoid switch. When temperature outside is 18 F the first crack of thermostat over cools engine thus immediately closes again, it never gets to fully open due to massive cooling system reserve on cold days
Will test the 194 F thermostat i bet it will open at 180 F
I change oil every November and every May, typically 2500 miles
 

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My 2006 used to run at 148 F in the winter thus gave a code, it is a mechanical device thus a wear item and needs periodic replacement
 

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At 2500 miles my stock engine doesn't need any oil either. Deceiving to claim your engine doesn't burn any when doing such short OCI.

If you have a failed thermostat then yeah engine will run cooler. But no, tstats are rated at opening temperature, so engine cannot run cooler than that. Tstat won't be fully open during summer either, if fully open it means you've maxed out the cooling system capability and from that point on engine temps are not controlled by the tstat anymore. Temps will continue to climb if so. Stock tstat temp is 79C or 174F.

From stant:

THERMOSTAT TEMPERATURES
  • Thermostats have a “rated” temperature such as 180F or 195F
  • This is the temperature the thermostat will start to 4open, give or take 3 degrees
  • The thermostat fully open about 15-20 degrees above its rated temperature
 

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At 2500 miles my stock engine doesn't need any oil either. Deceiving to claim your engine doesn't burn any when doing such short OCI.

If you have a failed thermostat then yeah engine will run cooler. But no, tstats are rated at opening temperature, so engine cannot run cooler than that. Tstat won't be fully open during summer either, if fully open it means you've maxed out the cooling system capability and from that point on engine temps are not controlled by the tstat anymore. Temps will continue to climb if so. Stock tstat temp is 79C or 174F.

From stant:

THERMOSTAT TEMPERATURES
  • Thermostats have a “rated” temperature such as 180F or 195F
  • This is the temperature the thermostat will start to 4open, give or take 3 degrees
  • The thermostat fully open about 15-20 degrees above its rated temperature
I do not make claims instead i measure.

I will explain in post below why one should not accept a car that burns oil to the point of asking for a quart of oil top up.
Any car that I have maintained from new has never burned a drop of oil as long as i keep oil changes under 5000 miles for daily driven cars and 2500 miles for rarely driven cars.

After 5000 miles oil breaks down and looses up to 8% of it's weight due to volatility at summer 90+ degrees F days or track running at 80+ F

I am saying that in 5,000 miles the oil level monitor has not dropped a single bar.

The oil i drained fills 5 quart jugs to the same level as the oil poured into motor

it may be the air bleed hole in thermostat keeps the motor over cooled on an 18 degree F day, will find out when i replace with 194 F thermostat will measure opening temperature of old thermostat and post picture of measurement, that is the only way to know for sure.

My 2006 with brand new thermostat still only got up to 168 F that is still better than prior 148 f running temp in cold weather

These autobahn engineered m5 just run to cold when at US speed limits in cold temperatures
 

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In days of old cars burned oil, it was accepted as the norm, now with modern piston design, ring packages and much better methods and tolerances of cylinder wall finishing it is not an issue during the real life of oil before additive packages start depleting and onset of oil brake down occurs.

I very much disagree with BMW recommended OCI's,
They may work for someone who drives 200 miles a day in moderate climates every day (see m5 with 266,000 miles on original bearings), but real life operation by typical M5 owners falls far outside of this ideal

Since 2014 I studied the many Blackstone reports that were posted on m5board, i did not pay much attention to wear particle counts but was amazed how quickly the quality of TWS oil was compromised.

Even those posting samples taken at under 5000 miles showed a very substantial decrease in high temperature viscosity from new oil specs as well as marked lowering of oil flash point to #'s one would expect from low budget straight Dino oils.

The problem is when oil breaks down what is left behind? basically what you see in fry pan after heating at high temperatures for a prolonged period; tar, and varnish it is similar to how the Novak Volitility test is conducted, weight loss is noted and reported.

This varnish causes harm to motor, secondary ring and oil ring do not benefit from combustion pressure to keep contact with cylinder walls, instead very light spring tension used in today"s low friction ring packages is all that applies.

When oil breaks down deposits are left throughout motor, that has many consequences, the one i am concerned with is coking of ring lands, once that happens the weak spring pressure of secondary rings will not overcome the friction created by the oil deposits, contact with cylinder wall is lost, oil enters combustion chamber, oils sensor requests a quart of oil, crazy to wait till this happens!

I have observed and recorded when this happens in most of my earlier cars, but now change oil more often rather than push it when it just is common sense cheap insurance.

Since 2014 i have been part of many oil discussions on m5board and shared my insights and concerns to benefit others, i hope it has been of some value.
 
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