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Discussion Starter #1
what are you guys using to measure Angle Torque? I need a new toy to add to my tool box!
 

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a couple of Beta torque wrenches


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Discussion Starter #3
a couple of Beta torque wrenches


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Thanks. Never heard of them before. always learning something new!
 

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I use a FACOM E.506-200S, in the US this made by branded as Proto, not sure what the model number is. Mine goes up to 200 nm since it has a 1/2" drive. There are different drive sizes but many of the chassis faster's are pretty high torque so 3/8" won't cut it. FACOM/Proto is equivalent grade to Snap-On with all the NIST/ISO traceability. It's an attachment that you put on your breaker bar or ratchet, so very versatile, and a very nice price point.

the only drawback is that it sometimes will not fit in the tight spaces that a dedicated torque wrench would, but that only happens like 5% of the time that I've had to use TTY on the M5. Basically the front lower ball joint nut with the wheel on.
 

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I use a FACOM E.506-200S, in the US this made by branded as Proto, not sure what the model number is. Mine goes up to 200 nm since it has a 1/2" drive. There are different drive sizes but many of the chassis faster's are pretty high torque so 3/8" won't cut it. FACOM/Proto is equivalent grade to Snap-On with all the NIST/ISO traceability. It's an attachment that you put on your breaker bar or ratchet, so very versatile, and a very nice price point.

the only drawback is that it sometimes will not fit in the tight spaces that a dedicated torque wrench would, but that only happens like 5% of the time that I've had to use TTY on the M5. Basically the front lower ball joint nut with the wheel on.
Thanks, I'll check them out. I was wondering about clearance issues with a tool of this style. I see it also measures torque. that's nice to have to verify against your torque wrench.
 

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I have multiple torque wrenches, probably too many, but only this one does torque and angle, I specifically bought this one for that. I don't think you can find something as accurate for the price as one of these since you're not paying for the wrench part of things, just the piezo electric part.

For other stuff I have the more conventional clicker types as well as a Torque-O meter style from Strap-On. Some stuff requires the claw foot style ends which generally are never TTY (like brake line fittings)
 

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I bought a 3/8 drive Gearwrench digital wrench on amazon for just under $200 to diy my rod bearings, worked well enough for me. Maxes at 135 nm I believe, and measures angle too if you get the flex head one like I did. Otherwise, they sell torque angle gauges at autozone for like $25 but you need something to prop the arm up against because they aren’t electronic.
 

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I bought a 3/8 drive Gearwrench digital wrench on amazon to diy my rod bearings, worked well enough for me. Maxes at 135 nm I believe, and measures angle too if you get the flex head one like I did. Otherwise, they sell torque angle gauges at autozone for like $25 but you need something to prop the arm up against because they aren’t electronic.
I was looking at those Gearwrench, have had good experience with their other tools. Seem to be quality stuff. Rod bearings is what scares me the most for accuracy.
I noticed all they have is flex head. does that give you any trouble?
 

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I have multiple torque wrenches, probably too many, but only this one does torque and angle, I specifically bought this one for that. I don't think you can find something as accurate for the price as one of these since you're not paying for the wrench part of things, just the piezo electric part.

For other stuff I have the more conventional clicker types as well as a Torque-O meter style from Strap-On. Some stuff requires the claw foot style ends which generally are never TTY (like brake line fittings)
was just looking at their torque wrenches, man, they are as pricey as snap-on!
 

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yes, the high end stuff costs more, but that's why it's used in aerospace/industry, etc. Tools like these often times require traceability. Any ISO/QS certified facility requires measurement tools to have traceability records because accuracy really matters, otherwise you can just use Harbor Freight.

If you're doing this for rod bearings, then you may want to spring for the BE bearing bolts from ARP. They are not TTY, you can just use a standard clicker wrench. The price difference between BMW bolts and BE bearing bolts almost covers the cost of this adapter. I've had mine for a few years, and for bearing, there was no access issue, you just need to use a standard 4" or 6" extension. You can compensate for torsion of the extension by using 1/2" extension or upping the torque very slightly.

What's great about these digital ones, is that when you reposition/ratchet back, it automatically picks up the angle again. Ideally when you do TTY, it is one clean continuous sweep, that’s hard to do when you have to do 120 deg at 60 lb ft of torque and part of the engine block may be in the way. Also mine tells me the final torque value and I can save these (logging and recording values is generally required on high precision work)

I think the 3/8" version from Proto that goes up to 150 nm is on Amazon for like $180-200. That's actually kinda cheap for what these things do. A Strap-On torque tech angle is like $500+.
 

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I would possibly check with Angle tool repair in WV as to what they will service as well. They are the service center for MAC, SnapOn, Matco, etc.
 

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I was looking at those Gearwrench, have had good experience with their other tools. Seem to be quality stuff. Rod bearings is what scares me the most for accuracy.
I noticed all they have is flex head. does that give you any trouble?
The flex head was actually helpful when tightening the bolts on cylinder 1, I didn’t remove either of the pumps so the main oil pump was a bit of a clearance problem and the flex head helped with that. Like gmt said, I would go for the arp bolts. Thats what I did, they are just one and done, torque to 50 ft lbs and that’s it. No angle, no multiple undo and redo’s, nada. Less room for error imo, but decently more expensive than oem bolts. Gearwrench makes a similar none flex head digital wrench that doesn’t do angle which you could use if you’re using arp rod bolts, but I got the angle one because I wanted the flex head and will probably need the angle function sooner or later. It also keeps the angle when you ratchet if you can’t get it in one sweep, and records the final values. If you’re using torque, it will show the final value in whatever unit you selected after it alerts you you’ve reached it and if you’re in angle, it will show the final angle you reached and whatever torque that is in your previously selected unit. In addition the screen is a live display so you know how close you are to your desired angle/torque, or you can just let the vibrating handle and the flashing lights alert you when you’re at set value. Common features on most digital angle wrenches I think, but I found it very useful. A good digital angle wrench/adapter is well worth the money imo.
 

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The money you save by DIY easily covers the cost of these tools (maybe not a Tech Angel tho). You then also have the tool still, so you really have to think about if you’ll ever need something like this again.

I’m one of those tool dorks, so i always talk myself in to buying a quality tool. With something like a Tech Angle you could sell it back and recover 90%of your cost, there a very liquid market for Strap-On. Just know that 3/8” drive won’t cut it for the torque required on the suspension, it makes sense to do the suspension links yourself also, since you have to touch them when doing rod bearing job.
 

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Just know that 3/8” drive won’t cut it for the torque required on the suspension, it makes sense to do the suspension links yourself also, since you have to touch them when doing rod bearing job.
Which suspension torques? Anything I had to undo I was able to re-torque to the spec indicated by newTIS no problem with 3/8 drive. Highest I found was 100 nm + 90 deg, but I'd love to find out if I was wrong before I go drive any more lol
 

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The money you save by DIY easily covers the cost of these tools (maybe not a Tech Angel tho). You then also have the tool still, so you really have to think about if you’ll ever need something like this again.

I’m one of those tool dorks, so i always talk myself in to buying a quality tool. With something like a Tech Angle you could sell it back and recover 90%of your cost, there a very liquid market for Strap-On. Just know that 3/8” drive won’t cut it for the torque required on the suspension, it makes sense to do the suspension links yourself also, since you have to touch them when doing rod bearing job.
lol, thats what I tell my wife! Then she says why do you need more cars? I say, cause I got the tools, now all I need is the parts!
 

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These are the ones that I have saved on my phone (sad but handy)

M12 wishbone/ control arm support 100 NM +90deg +-15. This the back one.

Tension strut (front one) to support 100 NM +90deg

Wishbone, tension strut to knuckle 165 NM

Tie rod end at knuckle 165 NM (122 lbf)

These last 2 are not TTY, and are limited access with the wheel on.

Not saying you can’t use 3/8” drive to get that but if you do have a $500 wrench and you know it’s beyond it’s rated range and you snap off the head, you deserve what you get. Also these high end digital ones do log the peak torque (my FACOM says it does). So when you send it in under warranty because of a failure, you may expect them to laugh at you.
 
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