BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I always thought the E30 M3 was two cylinders short of a full deck, but this dude has taken care of that. Not nearly as impressive as Piper's V10 E30, but still pretty cool at a reasonable price. No affiliation, etc; just wasting some time on eBay this morning...


BMW : M3 - eBay (item 160543387564 end time Mar-01-11 09:09:34 PST)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
642 Posts
I bet that thing screams. I applaud the LS1 swap in most cars. I wonder where the old S14 is? Either way, good find.

I don't think he'll ever get that price. If someone wanted the performance and wasn't stuck on the e30 body, one can purchase a 150k mile e36 at this point for $6k, call Vorshlag and buy their LS1 kit for $5k, and an LS1 with T56 from ebay for under $3000. Add some miscellaneous $$ and you are still under half the cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
:sad3:I just wished it wasn't a real M3
I,ve always wondered why people do this sort of thing to a good car?
Each to his own .......but why????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
That's pretty steep for a molested E30.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
I,ve always wondered why people do this sort of thing to a good car?
Each to his own .......but why????
I understand ultimately it is his money and his car, but I think when you have certain classics they should remain as close to standard as possible.I believe that the E30s used the same chasis. I might be wrong however. I still remember when my dentist was talking about getting a porsche speedster and chopping the top. I was utterly shocked that someone would do something like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
I understand ultimately it is his money and his car, but I think when you have certain classics they should remain as close to standard as possible.I believe that the E30s used the same chasis. I might be wrong however. I still remember when my dentist was talking about getting a porsche speedster and chopping the top. I was utterly shocked that someone would do something like that.
Well said!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,890 Posts
I understand ultimately it is his money and his car, but I think when you have certain classics they should remain as close to standard as possible.I believe that the E30s used the same chasis. I might be wrong however. I still remember when my dentist was talking about getting a porsche speedster and chopping the top. I was utterly shocked that someone would do something like that.
The M3 might use the same basic chassis layout but it's definitely not the same. Everything was reworked, from suspension pickup geometry to the windshield being a stressed member. If the typical E30 could be converted into an M3 the value of the real deal wouldn't be continuing to escalate. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lancefitzgiben

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,890 Posts
Interesting. The guy selling that car is the guy from Bullrun Season 3. They ran a vinyl wrapped Murcielago. He has some other crazy vehicles for sale at The Hummer Guy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
The M3 might use the same basic chassis layout but it's definitely not the same. Everything was reworked, from suspension pickup geometry to the windshield being a stressed member. If the typical E30 could be converted into an M3 the value of the real deal wouldn't be continuing to escalate. :)

Not sure about the first two sentences, but I don't believe your last one to be true. Different models of each car tend to command different prices. I think it is fair to think of these cars almost as classic cars. A matching numbers example will probably command a premium over one that doesn't have matching numbers. A good example would be matching numbers muscle cars. It is possible to change out and engine and suspension, but it still won't be worth as muh as a car in comprable shape that came equipped from the factory with the desired trim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,890 Posts
Not sure about the first two sentences, but I don't believe your last one to be true. Different models of each car tend to command different prices. I think it is fair to think of these cars almost as classic cars. A matching numbers example will probably command a premium over one that doesn't have matching numbers. A good example would be matching numbers muscle cars. It is possible to change out and engine and suspension, but it still won't be worth as muh as a car in comprable shape that came equipped from the factory with the desired trim.
I think we're saying the same thing. My point is that the M3 chassis is unique enough that you cannot make one from a typical E30. I agree 100% that the classic E30 M3 will continue to demand higher and higher values and that a matching number, unmolested example will definitely command a premium. The rule of thumb now for an E30 M3 is it's a $20k car...pay it up front for a nice example or buy a cheaper one and put the difference into it to get it up to snuff. Either way, the values will continue to escalate.

FWIW, I've been a moderator in E30 on bimmerforums for over 4 years and have owned at least a dozen regular E30's. If there was any way to make a regular chassis an M I'd have done it long ago. A typical E30 goes for $2-3k, and a bargain basement M3 starts at $10k. If there was some way to make the conversion I'd have lots of extra mod money for my M5. :D

Borrowed from the E30 M3 wiki:

<dl><dt>Body</dt></dl> The E30 M3 differed from the rest of the E30 line-up in many ways. The M3 was equipped with a revised stiffer and more aerodynamic body shell as well as "box flared" wheel-arches to accommodate a wider track with wider and taller wheels and tires. The only exterior body panels the standard model 3-series and the M3 shared were the hood, roof panel, and sunroof.
<dl><dt>Suspension</dt></dl> The E30 M3 differs from the standard E30 by having a 5x120 wheel bolt patern. The E30 M3 had increased caster angle through major front suspension changes. The M3 had specific solid rubber offset control arm bushings. It used aluminum control arms and the front strut tubes where changed to a design similar (bolt on kingpins and swaybar mounted to strut tube) to the E28 5-series. This included carrying over the 5 series front wheel bearings and brake caliper bolt spacing. The rear suspension is a carry over from the E30.
<dl><dt>Brakes</dt></dl> The E30 M3 had special front and rear brake calipers and rotors. It also has a special brake master cylinder.
<dl><dt>Driveline</dt></dl> The E30 M3 had a Getrag 265/5 5 speed gearbox, and rear differential with 4.10:1 final-drive ratio and 25% lockup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
Considering the E30 M3 was a "homologation special" it will always be extremely collectible - and the ones that are all original, immaculate low mile examples will command even more money.

The discussion surrounding powertrain swaps into E30 M3's has been covered exhaustively on s14.net and it will probably continue to be a popular topis of debate. The way I see it though - it basically comes down to bang for buck, and putting a tweaked S52 (the most common conversion) is much less expensive than having a high compression NA S14 built. Using a vette motor (great motor) in an E30 M3 is an interesting choice and would not be mine; however it's not my car or my money. I'd have done it in a reg E30 coupe. The S62 and S38(?) E60 V10 conversions are obviously high dollar and they at least keep it in the family.. but I'm not into it. I'd rather have another car for insanely fast acceleration. I'll have the tricked out E30 retaining a (highly modified) S14 and more driver involvement than you can shake a stick at.

My E30 M3 was totally stock and still had enough power to go sideways up here at 7,000 ft above sea level. They don't need more power.

Blah blah blah blah blah
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
The discussion surrounding powertrain swaps into E30 M3's has been covered exhaustively on s14.net and it will probably continue to be a popular topis of debate. The way I see it though - it basically comes down to bang for buck, and putting a tweaked S52 (the most common conversion) is much less expensive than having a high compression NA S14 built.
I had a 1991 e30 M3 that spat a cylinder thru the Block going about 120mph at VIR. It was a spectacular mess to clean up both on track and off. When I priced getting another S/14 built to replace the (numbers matching block) it was around $20k to put the car back on the road. The down sides were: 1) $20k 2) the car was no longer "numbers matching" and therefor worth way less 3) and lastly $20k I was not going to get approvals from the wife to spend.

I went with a 99 S/52 OBD-1 Conversion along with the 6 Speed Transmission. And it really changed the car into something special. And it gave the car a new personality altogether. Most importantly I now could track this car and run with the porsches - which pissed off many of my friends from Dorkiphus. The last point - is that the car now had something not unknown to e39M5 owners - TORQUE - the S/14 motor while being as close to perfection as a handbuilt motor can approach - had to be wound VERY high to reach the Power curve. The S/52 motor at around 300 HP has Torque all the way through the power curve. I loved the way the car drove with both engines.

The s/53 - 6Speed conversion cost $7,900. It was cash well spent.

I offer apologies to all e30 M3 purists - but hopefully my logic above holds. - JT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
I think we should take up a collection, buy the car and then crush it and scrap it... that disgusts me to no end
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top