BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 107 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
10,458 Posts
will be interesting to hear a review. OE bmw hoses come at the correct length, and are in some cases moulded, or include some heat shielding. They're pretty durable to last the 15-20 years that they last, but they are not cheap. I can't remember for sure, but i think i paid near $800 for all my coolant and vacuum hoses, though that may have included some other odds and ends back when i went thru all that a few years ago (actually that prob included thermostat, water pump, coolant etc)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
looks like a good upgrade kit. a little pricey....

i guess a black kit should be the best choice. i ao thinbking about getting one of these also!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Im chasing a pretty sizable intake leak currently. When I pop the dipstick lose with the car running, the engine's idle quality is not affected at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
763 Posts
Im chasing a pretty sizable intake leak currently. When I pop the dipstick lose with the car running, the engine's idle quality is not affected at all.
Uh, I think the case venting goes through the plenum at the oil vapor collector. Thus the ol' dip stick test won't be a real test of vacuum.

The most common sources on these motors, are the brake booster lines, IVC hoses, air pump/flap vacuum system and the intake gaskets.
 
  • Like
Reactions: davidoli

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Uh, I think the case venting goes through the plenum at the oil vapor collector. Thus the ol' dip stick test won't be a real test of vacuum.

The most common sources on these motors, are the brake booster lines, IVC hoses, air pump/flap vacuum system and the intake gaskets.
Blitzkrieg Bob:

Thanks. I was hoping to hear something along those lines. I figured if the leak was that massive that the car a) would hardly idle at all and b) would be displaying a check engine light and c) be down on power as well as not running NEARLY as rich as it is. The exhaust tips are sooted up after about 100 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Here's the skinny -

100% great kit. The only thing missing is the hose that goes from the bottom of the accumulator to the valve cover gasket. Of course, mine instantly crumbled upon removing it, as did almost all of the other hoses. (Taxi run to AutoZone and a few minutes behind the counter looking at donor-hoses found a suitable, temporary, replacement...) The ones leading from the booster to the two-way check valve were hard as rocks and just about turned to dust when I wiggled them. This kit includes those hoses, too. Really - it includes every darn line under there with length to spare.

Everything fit snugly and was sized correctly. The walls of the tubing are really thick and it appears to be high-quality stuff.

There are some things that you need to do that are not shown in the instructions- like remove the fuel rail. Other than that - it's fairly straightforward. I also replaced the o-rings at the stacks and some other bits and pieces while I was under there.

The car runs much differently now. Idles higher, but I suspect that once the ECU gets used to actually having a sealed engine, it will drop back down. On the test drive, the power was completely smooth, and although I could hear the resonance flap open before, now it is louder. This leads me to think that there wasn't enough vacuum to pull it all the way open, and now there is. I am curious to see what happens to my gas mileage as I obviously had at least one leak.

My suggestion - purchase the kit. It's money well spent

One other suggestion: While you've got everything off, take a torque wrench to the manifold-to-head nuts. Just for farts and giggles, I put a wrench to mine and was shocked to have them barely past finger-tight. I think I got about 1/2 a turn out of the wrench before it clicked.

-Dan
(AKA - M5 forum guinea pig)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks Dan. Im about to order it. Can you give a part number for the accumulator that is not included. Being that this is my DD I need to make sure I have one just incase something terrible happens while im installing the kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Thanks Dan. Im about to order it. Can you give a part number for the accumulator that is not included. Being that this is my DD I need to make sure I have one just incase something terrible happens while im installing the kit.
O-rings: 11611305124
Hose: 11151312861

Torque Spec: 15nm on the 13mm, 10nm on the 10mm
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
10,458 Posts
There are some things that you need to do that are not shown in the instructions- like remove the fuel rail. Other than that - it's fairly straightforward. I also replaced the o-rings at the stacks and some other bits and pieces while I was under there.
why remove the fuel rail? i've replaced all of the vac hoses with it in place. One thing to note, if you do remove the fuel rail, make sure you have some o rings on hand, because some will likely leak after being disturbed from 20 years of sitting. If you go that route, get 8 of them, one for each injector and one for the inlet and return lines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Because my vac lines going to the 2-way check valve were near-solid and welded on to the nipples, there was no way to get them off without removing the rail. Agreed on the o-rings. I have a few dozen laying around that I keep for instances like this, so I didn't mention it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Would I be wise to do the throttle body to cylinder head intake gaskets while tackling this project? They are original. 20 years and 84k miles old.

If so would it be necessary to resync the throttles?
 
1 - 20 of 107 Posts
Top