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Just got back from putting the springs on and thought I'd weigh in on what they are like for those of you still considering.

First of all, for all of those that say there is little to no difference in ride I don't think you drove your car much before swapping the springs. I could DEFINITELY notice a difference in the ride. I would put it this way:

"Comfort" setting is gone, kaput, outta here. The Comfort setting now feels like "Normal". Normal now feels like "Sport". Sport setting is now re-named "Obnoxious".

Having said that, the car HANDLES much better and looks the way the car is supposed to look.

NO REGRETS WHAT-SO-EVER! I LIKE IT!!!

Just wanted all you guys to know that if you want your "Comfort" setting, don't lower your car. Put your car in "Normal" and drive it around awhile, if you like that, you'll like it lowered. If you don't, I'd pass if I were you.

Just my opinion and submitted as such. :cheers:
 

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Any before and after shots?
 

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M-bitious, how much did the Hartge springs set up back?
How much of a drop did you get?

I'm almost convinced to get the H&R setup, but it'd be nice to get your thoughts on the Hartge.
Thanks
 

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Is there anyway where we can get the spring rates of these aftermarket springs so we can all compare the stiffness of each brand.
Are H&R springs progressive wound or straight?
 

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M-bitious said:
That is why I went with Hartge. No difference in ride, even in comfort.

Frank.
From a physics standpoint, this is not possible. You cannot make a spring shorter and not alter it's properties. The simplest thing to think about is that under full weight, a shorter spring has less room to travel, and will have to be stiffer to prevent bottoming out.

What you are saying is that you haven't noticed a difference in ride or comfort under the conditions that you've experienced. Perhaps you haven't driven on rough roads, or with heavy loading.

It sounds like the Hartge springs may be a bit softer (more spring travel) under lighter loads. But that could also mean a compromise in agressive driving. It sounds like the H&R springs may be geared for more agressive driving, and so have better travel and ride under heavier loads.

I'll bet you lunch though, that anyone who installs shorter springs in their car will eventuall notice a difference in ride stiffness, all other things equal, and provided the springs meet or exceed the OEM specs.
 

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Wolverine said:
From a physics standpoint, this is not possible. You cannot make a spring shorter and not alter it's properties. The simplest thing to think about is that under full weight, a shorter spring has less room to travel, and will have to be stiffer to prevent bottoming out.

What you are saying is that you haven't noticed a difference in ride or comfort under the conditions that you've experienced. Perhaps you haven't driven on rough roads, or with heavy loading.

It sounds like the Hartge springs may be a bit softer (more spring travel) under lighter loads. But that could also mean a compromise in agressive driving. It sounds like the H&R springs may be geared for more agressive driving, and so have better travel and ride under heavier loads.

I'll bet you lunch though, that anyone who installs shorter springs in their car will eventuall notice a difference in ride stiffness, all other things equal, and provided the springs meet or exceed the OEM specs.
From a practical standpoint though, it is possible with progressive rate springs. The ride feel would be pretty much identical, though the stiffness difference would be felt with larger bumps. If this is case with this example, I have no idea. But, properly developed progressive springs can give you most of (though not all) the best of both worlds.
 

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I'd like to know how people feel about these springs several years after installing them.

I've done some reading now for about an hour, and it seems that everyone really likes these springs, but we are also talking about people who installed them 5 years ago now.

Does anyone have any current information that they would consider sharing, now that some significant time has passed.

Thanks,

-Paul
 

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I have some input here. Wolverine is pretty much telling the truth here, but left some details out. I know why and how you can make a spring that gives lower ride height, but the maintaining the same comfort under normal driving. And the best suspensions manufacturers know this too.
I have worked as a suspension engineer before and you can actually design a spring that have two or more different spring rates in one spring. That's like two or more springs in one. The free length of the aftermarket spring is most likely the same as stock, to make it sit tight even when the suspension is fully extended. The stock springs are progressive. This means that it does not have a linear force vs compression curve. To make a spring that lowers the car, keeps the everyday comfort and does not bottom out too easy, is having two or three spring rates in one spring. First few turns of the spring is pretty "soft", decreasing the ride height. Then the part of the spring stroke used under normal drivning (small bumps, cornering at low speeds etc) is probably close to stock spring rate. Then there should be a progressive part from the mid-section to the last part of the spring stroke. That last part needs to be, just as Wolverine says, stiffer/higher spring rate than stock (progressive or not). This is to keep it from bottoming out, due to shorter effective stroke/wheel travel.
This means that you will have a lower car that feels the same under normal driving. Most lowering spring kits doesn't lower more than about 1 inch, to minimize the negative effects on the shock absorbers, due to increased internal preassure and risk of cavitation. The EDC helps to reduce the loss of shock absorber preformance, since the adjustment valve is partly preassure reactive.
Note that this does NOT mean that all lowering spring kits work well, but that it's possible to make such a design. So some of you might be right, that you couldn't feel any difference.

From a physics standpoint, this is not possible. You cannot make a spring shorter and not alter it's properties. The simplest thing to think about is that under full weight, a shorter spring has less room to travel, and will have to be stiffer to prevent bottoming out.

What you are saying is that you haven't noticed a difference in ride or comfort under the conditions that you've experienced. Perhaps you haven't driven on rough roads, or with heavy loading.

It sounds like the Hartge springs may be a bit softer (more spring travel) under lighter loads. But that could also mean a compromise in agressive driving. It sounds like the H&R springs may be geared for more agressive driving, and so have better travel and ride under heavier loads.

I'll bet you lunch though, that anyone who installs shorter springs in their car will eventuall notice a difference in ride stiffness, all other things equal, and provided the springs meet or exceed the OEM specs.
 

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I had my H+R's installed for a month and my experience was that they lower the car perfectly and are definitely stiffer than stock springs.
The big difference in performance for me came on the freeway at speeds of 70-80 and up. When you hit larger bumps I blew through the
travel and the car gets a little too bouncy for my tastes. I decided to go with KW V3 coilovers and have been happy since.
 

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From a physics standpoint, this is not possible. You cannot make a spring shorter and not alter it's properties. The simplest thing to think about is that under full weight, a shorter spring has less room to travel, and will have to be stiffer to prevent bottoming out.

What you are saying is that you haven't noticed a difference in ride or comfort under the conditions that you've experienced. Perhaps you haven't driven on rough roads, or with heavy loading.

It sounds like the Hartge springs may be a bit softer (more spring travel) under lighter loads. But that could also mean a compromise in agressive driving. It sounds like the H&R springs may be geared for more agressive driving, and so have better travel and ride under heavier loads.

I'll bet you lunch though, that anyone who installs shorter springs in their car will eventuall notice a difference in ride stiffness, all other things equal, and provided the springs meet or exceed the OEM specs.
It is possible.

Increase the number of coils and the spring loses it's strength.

Lots of coils packed close together lowers the car and retains the same spring rate. The spring rate is what causes the ride to be soft or hard.

There are so many ways to make a spring.
 

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This is why I prefer eibachs over the H&Rs. You can't lower as much as you do with the H&Rs without significantly affecting ride quality. The eibachs are progress wound, so in normal city traffic where you're not pushing the shocks, they feel almost indistinguishable from stock. When you go over bigger bumps though, you def start to feel the stiffer spring rate when compressed. It's a great compromise - no regrets at all with the eibachs.
 
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