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That depends on what your definition of small changes is and to that we may agree that we can both disagree.
My definition of small changes are that the the rear rotors are shared with regular E28 518-520-630-633 etc...off the shelf from BMW assembly parts bin, E34 M5 had its own brakes system front and rear in diameter. BMW upgrade the front brakes on E28 M5 using 4pot ATE cast caliper and left the rear complete stock, porque ?. The rear trailing arms bushings are shared again from the regular production line E28 518i up to M5. The Oil Temp gage is missing bloody critical option for our S38/M88! and BMW left the door open in Oil Filter housing so I can put the E34 M5/E30 M3 150C sensor to read as accurate as it could be! My personal Oil Temp Gauge I created till today people are confused that this option was available up to special order when they see my gage in my E24 M6. On my E24E28 I do miss the rear to be more tight!!! and that is why plan is to adapt a good set of trailing arms from E34 M5 with the unique slide bearing bushing with adjustable camber option. No downs side on that upgrade either. Just make a personal note when you driving your E34 M5 those rear bushings makes the car rear end one pice with your butt on the seat. On the E28/E24 you can feel the rear mushy specially on the twists were the side load is mandatory. Control arm bushings Upper and lower....Let me remind you that if you give your car to the local BMW authorized dealership they will replace the Upper Control arm bushings with the Black regular bushings because according to the ETK catalog these are the proper bushings and then you upgraded to the aka green E34 M5 design. E31 Lower control arm is one of the best upgrade Factory Upgrade on E28E24 with spherical bearings makes the side load one to one with the car chassis. Only one thing will move is the tire side wall, not the suspension etc..etc....

Above are the small changes I wanted do direct with particular your car and also from being in your shoes like kind of ala OEM upgrade. Because I do agree with you restoring the car back to its original condition and I do support that but again these small changes I was referring as I call it "Hidden Upgrades" will make the car more pleasant to handle in the next level of handling.

There is no owner of E28 M5 nor E24 M6 who sad one bad word with this upgrade rear brakes to E34 M5. You can hear only very good comments and its desirable upgrade. No down site for this upgrade.

I am aware of when buying a stainless steel brake lines it comes as a package front and back but I never ever thought that you will be changing the brake lines in the back as well. I tough you will separate the rear complete brake overhaul in separate day order. Doing rear lines will even the brake bias design and will make the pedal travel and will apply more brake pads torque than from before front and back.

Front Rotors:

When I do break job on any E28 M5 or E24 M6 and the owner wants stock replacement I always order the E32 750 front rotors, they they are 302mm and yes they do clear the caliper. But the real benefit is that the rotor cooling is from behind ! I hate what BMW did with E28 M5 rotors made then cool down from inside, having BBS mesh/cross spoke complete closed wheel design when the wheel is in motion it becomes like a solid wall. Their is no way the rotor to be cooled down and thus causes the rotor to overheat. When I used to have on my E24 M6 stock system I always had a problem with the Original design...changed to E32 and my problems got away with warped rotors. Yea I do get the idea of having the wholes inside the hub in order to cool it down but were the air is coming from with 16inch closed BBS cross spoke...There is a lot more air traveling underneath the car than the wheel in motion form outside.

In my opinion E32 750 Front brakes are upgrade over the stoke E28 M5 and its proven with my money and my personal experience. I have put over 100k miles on my DD E24 M6 and have leared a lot over that period of time from my pocket!

Just sharing what works for me.

Regards
Anri
 

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Interesting comments, Anri.
However by doing all these mods to the E28 M5 you're effectively dialling out the unique characteristics that made these cars what they are.
Personally I wouldn't want an E28 that handles like a E34, brakes like an E32, etc - it would lose it's identity and feel.
Sure, sometimes they are found wanting in the brakes department, but you learn to anticipate this and compensate accordingly when driving.

Just my two cents worth.:M5thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter #183 (Edited)
Personally I wouldn't want an E28 that handles like a E34, brakes like an E32, etc - it would lose it's identity and feel.
Sure, sometimes they are found wanting in the brakes department, but you learn to anticipate this and compensate accordingly when driving
You are spot on and I fully agree. In the meantime, the Stahlflex brake-line set from Dickhaut specials has arrived yesterday and the fronts are already installed. I still have to do the rears for which I am concidering to have the calipers rebuild, but I will maintain the original 284x10 disks and matching calipers.
 

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Hi BMWWGN and Raymond,

Interesting comments, Anri. However by doing all these mods to the E28 M5 you're effectively dialling out the unique characteristics that made these cars what they are.Personally I wouldn't want an E28 that handles like E34, brakes like an E32, etc - it would lose it's identity and feel.
I have learned a thing or two for the passed 8+ years when I started to mess around with and studied all BMW chassis, suspension, power, gear ratios, all M cars and continue to learn new stuff day by day because I am eager to learn.

Lets walk together around the BMW facts with their real product(not my opinion hear!)No matter what you do you will never change the DNA of the E28 M5, period ! With one word no matter what you do the E28 M5 will never ever handle like E34 M5, period.

From your comment in my opinion you are in the wrong concept. What BMW did from E28 to E34 chassis changes and that alone is one of the 2 DNA main keys of why the E28 will never be an E34 M5. If you thinking that changing the rear trailing arms the car will change its characteristic to E34,E32 you are far away from the right concept.

The E34 M5 Chassis: has much more Rigid chassis design. Just to give you and example the transmission tunnel it has like a small reinforcement, the "B" pillar is designed much stronger than the one on the E28 also I can point tons of small changes that you never ever sow... A good reason why when you approach a drive way with any E28 and you enter diagonal the entire E28 M5 chassis is making this cricking noises and chassis is cracking like an old person fingers..........So assume we should agree hear that this not fixable on the E28 M5, correct.

Handling: The biggest change BMW did is extended the E34 Wheel base up to 108,7inches that is the total of 5.4inches longer wheel base than the E28 M5 with 103.3 inches. Both cars are using the same engine layout and that makes the E34 M5 being at 50/50 Weight distribution. The E28 M5 is Front 54+%-46%Rear that make the car NOSE heavy and that is the Character of the E28 M5 Old Dated handling characteristics of what you are talking about keeping the car to what its is. for the time period correct. I have scaled my E24 M6 US that has rear AC system and its has more weight on the rear and the number shows 54%-46%. The E28 M5 does not have extra weight in the middle of the car to balance and that will make probably 55%-46%.

Take a look E28 M5, E24 M6 build based on the same chassis. The M88/S38 is hanging up front of the cross member/wheel, almost 4cyl are up front. E34 M5 has only 3cyl upfront and that make the handling characteristics to an E34 M5. If you think that changing the trailing arms and rear rotors or master will make the character of the E28 M5 to be an E34 M5 you answer is never ever.

Sure, sometimes they are found wanting in the brakes department, but you learn to anticipate this and compensate accordingly when driving.
It is very simple. If BMW knew with the E28 M5 that this type of cars people would go crazy... trust me certainly they would never use the regular E28 518i rear non vented rotor nor mushy bushings on the trailing arm...nor front trusted arm......and they proved it with the E34 M5.

What is the final conclusion ? Again, no matter what you do on the car you will never change it's DNA, period. But you can only Improve the existing DNA design !

On my personal M6 I have made some suspension changes and that makes the car much more fun to drive with Classic Feeling.

Just installing my Spherical Bearing bushings make the steering tight and nice with the range of factory ride.

I hope you understand the DNA point and making small changes to improve what I was referring will only put a smile on your face as a pilot and on some one you will share a very nice tight ride with time period correct engineering!

Regards
Anri
 

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All good points Anri,

However I certainly didn't mean to imply that the E28 will be miraculously transformed into an E34, simply by modifying a few suspension components!
What I meant was that the mods tend to make it less of an E28 and more of something else, thereby losing its original character - for better or worse, depending on which camp you are in.
Thankfully there are still a few owners out there who prefer the original soft suspension, brakes, performance and handling characteristics of the stock E28 M5 - needless to say, I'm one of these "purists"!

It's becoming more and more difficult to find an unmodified, stock E28 M5 these days, but on the plus side this means that original, unmolested examples are an increasingly rare and valuable commodity.
 

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Discussion Starter #186 (Edited)
Following Anri’s advice, I placed an order for Stainless Steel brake hoses at Dickhaut Specials in Germany. I know one of its owners, Alf, from the old German E34 M5 network, not only as enthusiast BMW owners, but also specialists in the braking department. One of the advantages of the ABM Stahlflex product is that it comes with a German ABE document that certifies its use for the E28S by the German TuV. One may argue about the usefulness of such a document in the Netherlands; the Dutch legislation doesn’t require it, but at least it states (1) The manufacturer and (2) because under German law, the use of uncertified components, especially in safety critical applications, makes one liable for injuries and damages in case of a mishap.



One may argue the same for the Pagid Blue RS42 pads, however, these are made in accordance to the ECE R90 standard, which is a statutory standard in the EU. This is something else than using pads or hoses from the bay-of e, most of which come from Chinese sources and thus most often without a mandatory certification.



Replacing the hoses is straightforward, especially when the old brake-oil already have been removed. I simply disconnected the connection of the hose to the cars brake system, by loosening the lower flange. One needs a 13mm and 14mm half-open wrench to do so; The 14mm sized wrench for the socket on the brake-hose and the 13mm wrench for the flange on the cars brake-line.

Caution: It is imperative to remove any debris on the connection before disconnecting the brake hose as otherwise, dirt will enter the braking system.

When the brake-hose is disconnected from the cars braking system, it is simply a matter of removing the O-ring guide from the strut and disconnect the connection to the caliper.



Because the ABM Stahlflex hoses have the same 14mm hexagonal socket as the OE originals, installing is the same as removal, however in opposite direction.



Caution: Make sure that the brake-line is not twisted. This will result in a failure to meet the periodic inspection for safety and road-use requirements of almost any country.

Because rubber is normally not inert to the aggressive nature of brake-fluid, one can expect that the inner line deteriorates over the course of its service life; as a result, the core will narrow down which imposes a restriction to the pressurized brake/fluid.



As one can see, the inner core is still intact, clean and not congested; this hose didn’t reach its end of life yet, but given their age (>14years) had to be replaced anyhow. Additionally, rubber does expand when the fluid is pressurized and thus the inner diameter of the core enlarges as well; This will cause a slight delay in the brakes response time. Since the ABM Stahlflex lines contain an inner-core made from Teflon that is not susceptible to pressurized fluids, the response time of the brakes is imminent and constant.



The brake-pads and the brake-hoses are items that can be easily reversed. The first (brake pads) because it is a normal wear/tear part, the second (ABM Stahlflex) because it does not require any modifications what so ever. Both are just a measure that improves sustainability and also enhances the braking performance to the requirements of today’s road-going traffic in Europe without changing the original character of #231.

This brings us to the rear brakes. Originally, the plan was to check the calipers and change the pads, which a simple maintenance item. Add to that the replacement of the brake booster’s pressure accumulator to place some fences?! The reality was a little more superstitious. By following Anri’s advice to use Stainless Steel braided brake hoses, the fences are repositioned because the four rear hoses need replacement as well to avoid disturbance in balance in braking between front and rear.



The rear brakes themselves are identical to the 535i and M535 with 284x10mm brake disks and single-piston operated calipers. Anri recommends replacing these for the latter E34 M5 ventilated brake disks (300x20mm) and matching calipers.



In the discussions in this topic, I see that opinions differ. Whilst I have every respect for opinions, I am a firm believer in fact based decision making. This is what I have done with the front-caliper rebuild as well as the change to the stainless steel brake-hoses because of the underlying facts. This is also what I will do with the rear-brakes.

Fact 1: The European E28 M5, at least the early DC91 variants have an unloaded weight of 1430kg, which is significantly (121kg) less than the North American (DC93) version with an unloaded wheight of 1551kg.

Fact 2: The four brake-hoses on the rear need to be replaced as well to avoid a disturbance of the brake-balance between front/rear.

Fact 3: There is no proof that the rear brake calipers were rebuild in the past, also not during the post-purchase inspection II that was carried out by main dealer Smudde in 2002. Chances are that the seals are nearing thirty years of age.

Without more facts, I won’t put the fences to beyond the general overhaul of the rear-brake calipers. I may regret that when driving the 2758mtr high Stilfserjoch between South Tirol and Lombardi, but at least I then have the facts in my hand to make a decision to divert away from originality in favor of better braking performance.
 

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Rear

Raymond,

Great comments you have there. I do appreciate your understanding of what works for me and what points I have...some people don't get it.

I think you are in a great path with keeping the rear caliper as is, why ?

-The fact that the rotor is all shiny and even tell us that the caliper is applying equal brake pad pressure to the rotor and comes back to release the pad off the rotor.

- Also please check both rotor inner sides to get an impression and to make sure its shiny and clean and free of rust as the front part.

- It will be healthy point to bleed the rear calipers! That will be very easy because all you have to do it bring fresh oil to the rear calipers(Yea, when you replace the SS lines you have to bleed the system).I have rebuild many OEM sets and always when I take the piston with Air...lots of water comes from the piston, means moisture is stuck there. Its fast job to do but it will make the caliper rebuild time in much further future !

As we can see the rear rotor dust cover is kind of prepared to be fitted larger rear rotor.

E34 M5 rear brakes are also ware and tare item and can bring no changes to the car value since its a quick replacement back to OEM set up.

I am eager to see your impression with SS lines :)

Keep report back with feedback.

Regards
Anri
 

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Without more facts, I won’t put the fences to beyond the general overhaul of the rear-brake calipers. I may regret that when driving the 2758mtr high Stilfserjoch between South Tirol and Lombardi, but at least I then have the facts in my hand to make a decision to divert away from originality in favor of better braking performance.
Raymond,

Looks like the door will stay open for possible E34 M5 rear brake upgrade ?

Today after work its always time to play, I took a pic picture of the E34 M5 set up on my E24 M6.

As you can see the OEM dust cover is perfectly fitting inside with 300mm rotor. Caliper is the same as the one on the E28 M5 its got just internal bigger piston.

Back to the originality, Personally I am still scratching my hair what it is and how the originality will be downgraded...using the E34 M5 rear set up and still keep the OEM rear 518>M5 brake caliper and rotor to keep it at home on shelf to collect dust along with other parts.

I think the performance advantage will be more practical for special Events like Alps and other nice trips versus keeping the originality with less performance.

Is our cars will ever meet the BMW museum for permanent display to keep the originality? the answer is Never. Why not enjoy the performance versus originality. I will take the performance all day long, but that is me.

Disregard the [email protected] 15mm wheel adapter and the studs I am using.

Regards
Anri
 

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Discussion Starter #190 (Edited)
First e28 M5 said:
Looks like the door will stay open for possible E34 M5 rear brake upgrade ?
Hi Anri,

As I wrote before, I believe in facts. Originality is most often a matter of how one feels and as you have observed members express strong opinions to support their feelings. I admit that feelings are important in one’s life as it determines the comfort zone, but that is another matter.

What determines a car’s originality ?

Hmmm, that is an interesting question. For one, this is the car that has is closest to the condition in which it left the factory with all the original components up to wear/tear parts in place. These are considered the holy-grails, but at the same time, one must ask himself the question of how usable these cars are?

To another, a car is original when it is maintained with all OE parts and is in original condition. I consider my car to come very close to that because the paint and the chassis are in factory original condition. Not perfect, but also not replaceable. Engine is matching numbers, but rebuild. To one, this is original, to another this is not. Fact is that new OE (Mahle) pistons were used in the first oversize (93,555mm). Is this still original? At least it is fully documented.

Another owner prefers customization, most often to individualize the exterior appearance or the performance of the car. The brake-upgrade that you suggested fits in this category. IMHO, this is an upgrade that does not affect the appearance of the car, nor is it not reversible. But fact is that it is not original, but neither are my Pagid Blue RS42’s and the ABM Stahlflex. However, these changes are reversible and therefore not intrusive. If I read between the lines of the Classic Data rulings changes related to safety do not affect originality, however this is highly argumentative for this example and most likely out of context.

Regardless of originality, it basically comes down to justification or blunt said: “Why am I spending resources on this topic?” And with the facts that I have shared, I simply cannot answer that question so there is no justification …. at least not at the moment. In that respect, you are quite correct that I didn’t shut the door, but need more facts from a personal observation with the existing system.
 

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To another, a car is original when it is maintained with all OE parts and is in original condition. I consider my car to come very close to that because the paint and the chassis are in factory original condition. Not perfect, but also not replaceable. Engine is matching numbers, but rebuild. To one, this is original, to another this is not. Fact is that new OE (Mahle) pistons were used in the first oversize (93,555mm). Is this still original? At least it is fully documented.
This is where I'm coming from, also:
Such a car is maintained to its original specification and configuration, using OE parts.
And there's really no question that a first oversize OE caliper repair restores the original design.:M5thumbs:
 

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Hi Anri, As I wrote before, I believe in facts. Originality is most often a matter of how one feels and as you have observed members express strong opinions to support their feelings. I admit that feelings are important in one’s life as it determines the comfort zone, but that is another matter.
I am fully aware of that we are fact driven people. But I wander how would you determine comparison ? You have seen one side of the coin the other side is dark for you...you don't have comparison on the table. Its the same point why you are upgrading the brake lines ?, its only one purpose the word upgrade not downgrade.

My 02cents is when you go to your E28M5 trip sure you will see some mountain twists, push the car to the zone you will feel comfortable as a driver, no need to improve driving skills just enjoy your limit as a driver. Pay attention after you do several corners how the rear brakes will feel weak and the front will crab and make the nose dive... then think of how your E34 M5 brakes at corners. Specially with the more aggressive Pagid brake compound you are using.

What determines a car’s originality ?

Hmmm, that is an interesting question. For one, this is the car that has is closest to the condition in which it left the factory with all the original components up to wear/tear parts in place. These are considered the holy-grails, but at the same time, one must ask himself the question of how usable these cars are?

To another, a car is original when it is maintained with all OE parts and is in original condition. I consider my car to come very close to that because the paint and the chassis are in factory original condition. Not perfect, but also not replaceable. Engine is matching numbers, but rebuild. To one, this is original, to another this is not. Fact is that new OE (Mahle) pistons were used in the first oversize (93,555mm). Is this still original? At least it is fully documented.

Another owner prefers customization, most often to individualize the exterior appearance or the performance of the car. The brake-upgrade that you suggested fits in this category. IMHO, this is an upgrade that does not affect the appearance of the car, nor is it not reversible. But fact is that it is not original, but neither are my Pagid Blue RS42’s and the ABM Stahlflex. However, these changes are reversible and therefore not intrusive. If I read between the lines of the Classic Data rulings changes related to safety do not affect originality, however this is highly argumentative for this example and most likely out of context.
Raymond, I know how 90%+ European people car classic hunters thinks, lots of requirement and being too picky when it comes to a purchase...trust me a I deal all the time with it! Hear in US continent if an engine is rebuild at low miles car that is fine it will be a not a deal brake. To me personally I don't care and as you said at least is documented. But the truth of that matter is that fact that your engine has been rebuild at such a low km aka 98k km is not so good for majority of the European people but again personally I don't care, that immediately gives a quick judgmental of European person that the car was not cared well at this low km and its no longer Original car.

In your case the real fact is: 1) You are not planing to sell the car any time soon, 2) My feeling is that the E28M5 car will be transferred to your growing sons. So in this case of not having the car for offer why not improve some mild points of not braking the look of the car as you mentioned in a favor of performance were it will put only a smile on your face.

Regardless of originality, it basically comes down to justification or blunt said: “Why am I spending resources on this topic?” And with the facts that I have shared, I simply cannot answer that question so there is no justification …. at least not at the moment. In that respect, you are quite correct that I didn’t shut the door, but need more facts from a personal observation with the existing system.
Been there done that...All I can say if upgrade you are going to be happy and like it! At the end of the day the most important thing is to put a smile on your face and the original calipers and rotors will stay and collect dust in your garage if one day originality is more important than happy driving experience put them back. Also as far as I can see your car is driven only on great events were you push the car not just driving like old man...M5 should be driven like its original Statement "Woolf in a ship skin" !

Lets not dig more on to this. I will await for your response after the trip with the brake overhaul and the new brake pad compound in this regard and we will have more road facts to share and discus.

Regards
Anri :M5launch:
 

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do you have info on filling volumes of:

1: Braking system
2: Power Steering system (ATF) for the H32 system

Even in teh repair manual, there is no info
In your question you have your answer...NO, there is not such information anywhere at least I have never found that info nor I want to spent and waist my time to dig this information searching for years and years..I just go by filling the fluid.

But, Interesting fact/steps of how to poor Power steering ATF to the system.

1. Lift the front end of the car including the wheels so the tires have no contact with the ground( I guess floor jack will work fine, or put the car on yor lift)
2. Remove the screen but still poor through, some ATF oil inside the system and keep an eye on the level.
3. Turn the steering wheel full lock to lock Left and Right and the engine Must be off !
4. Repeat several times and poor more oil if its needed.
5. Start the engine and then turn the steering wheel lock to lock several times while the car is in the air.

I have learned this procedure from Mercedes EPC manual repair, they do have a video of each procedure you want to do.

The reason being is to Avoid the the Power Steering Pump to make that crazy noises till the oil goes inside the pump.

Very interesting way haaaa, I did follow this way with one E31 850Ci I do maintain and the hi pressure power steering hose explode(typical E31 issue) and it worked perfect.

Regarding the level of how much ATF you have to put that is not possible to determine, why? Because even you put say 350ml it will work then if you make it up to 370ml again it will be fine.....so their no exact of how much to poor.

Personally, I do keep the ATF level around half full, when the engine is shut off you press the brake pedal say around 6-10times and the level is raising I do like to see the ATF oil after 10th brake pump just to be a tad over the metal filter screen. It always works perfect to me.

The Brakes system I do have the pressure pump so I bleed the system without help but at the end I always need some one to help with pump and release......This pre pressure pump it does help but it does not work so well....and also the right way is to start from the rear right, rear left etc...

I hope my experience of what works for me to make some sense to you.

Regards
Anri
 

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Discussion Starter #195 (Edited)
The available maintenance history dates back to 1993, but does not contain any proof that any maintenance work was done to the rear calipers; changes are that the seals are as old as the car itself, namely almost thirty years.



As can be seen, one of the brake hoses didn’t separate from the caliper meaning that it is very tight. It was still possible to push-back both pistons, which is an indication of a them being in a good condition. The hoses are stamped with a 1985 date-code, which confirmed that these are still the original hoses. The rubber of the rear-hoses is not as supple as the fronts that also date back to 07/1985. It is difficult to assess the life that is still left in them, but relying on the ‘knock-wood’ approach is too reactive. The hoses, four of them, will be replaced with the hoses from the ABM Stahlflex kit.



The calipers themselves were send to the same brake-specialist that rebuild the front calipers. Their inspection revealed no defects and no abnormalities. The calipers were bead-blasted, powder coated and rebuild with a new seals and guides. The pistons were in like new condition so they were reused.



The transport of brake-oil to the rear calipers requires two flexible joints per caliper. One from chassis to rear trailing arms and one from the brakes back-plates to the caliper.



The backing plates themselves are rather dirty and I’d rather replace them if not I have to remove perfectly working weal bearings to do so. This doesn’t make sense to me, so I gave them a clean and added a layer of zinc primer to the mounting provisions for the brake-lines to avoid corrosion



The brake-pads themselves date back to 04/2002 and still have an average compound thickness of 11,1mmwith a ±0,1mm spread on them. This is OK so these were given a good clean before reinstallation onto the rear calipers, which is rather straightforward.



Please note that each carrier is bolted to the strut with two M12 bolts torqued with 60Nm. The caliper is bolted to the carrier with an SW7 guide-bolts (30Nm each).



I must admit that the rear section doesn’t look as clean as the front, especially the rusted final-drive, but also here there is no compelling reason to initiate a rebuild. But when time comes, it will most likely be outsourced to Hardemann Motorsport in Delft (Netherlands) as they have an excellent track record in rebuilding these Limited Slip Differential’s. The backing plates themselves will only be replaced if one of the wheel-bearings require replacement.



Because I also replaced the hydraulic brake boost (H31 system) pressure accumulator, I had to fill the Power Steering reservoir as well as bleeding the brake caliper. The filling procedure of the H31 system is a multistep procedure that is described in the E28’s factory repair manual, but this is basically identical to the procedure that is mentioned by Anri.

The brake-system was filled with normal braking fluid for the time being because it doesn’t make sense to pour the expensive 50 Euro per liter Castrol SRF that also has a short life-span (18months max). This will be done after the winter, but only when the brakes are properly bed-in and passed the commissioning phase.

I did took her out for a small test-drive. The immediate gain is the complete lack of vibrations and noise coming from the front wheels. It is not so much that this was bad before the caliper rebuild, but I can only say that the stuck piston did have a detrimental impact on the driving comfort. The new situation is quite a revelation and I think that performance will be a bit better too.

I didn’t really test the braking performance. In order to do so, I have to follow the bedding instructions from Pagid, which forces me to speeds that impose a real threat to my driver’s license, at least in my country, however the German A31 is no more than Fifty-five kilometers to the east, but such a session has to be planned and we are rapidly closing in into the winter season over here.
 

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Discussion Starter #196 (Edited)
This month marks the 30th birthday of the BMW M5. Since then, the E28S M5 evolved into four succeeding generations, each of which, also is successful in the market. Dutch magazine Autovisie recognized these facts and used this opportunity to plan a special feature about the M5. I was invited to participate with my E28S also, as well as three other enthusiast owners of the E34S, E39S and E60S. Autovisie’s editor, Peter Hilhorst arranged the loan of BMW Netherlands own press car, an F10 M5 in the ’30 Jahre M5’ edition, thus with the more powerful engine specification (600hp/700Nm).

For the editorials, we were expected on Friday the 26th of September early in the morning at the premises of the Dutch police academy in Lelystad. They have a training-track with a length of about 2500mtr’s that they mainly use for training of motorcycle police, SWAT teams etc. They also allow other organizations to use the track provided that their objectives matches its purpose, for instance road-safety trainings. Autovisie arranged the course for the Friday morning allowing them to plan and perform their editorial program in a strict timeline without the disturbance of other road users.

Lelystad is about a 100km drive from where I live. This is not really that far, but about half of which are congested two lane roads on which it is impossible to overtake in rush-hour, hence why I allowed for a fifteen minute margin. We arrived shortly before 8:00PM where we were the first to arrive, but soon after the others owners arrived as well as Peter with the F10S and the photographic staff.

My preparations for this event was limited. I managed to replace the sound-insulation of the engine-hood, but not the overhaul of the brakes. This was planned just after returning from the Eiffel trip and three weeks for such an extensive program is just to short; I needed two weeks to define the program anyhow.

After a cup of coffee, we drove to the track to start the well planned program, which was an interactive mix of passive-and active photo-shoots and interviews. The first hour was spend shooting group photo’s, static as well as dynamic with Peter pushing the F10S to its drifting limits through one of the tracks two apexes. After the group-shoots, the dynamic car to car shoots were taken. This consisted of the E28S with E34S, E39S with E60S and as an ‘alpha & omega’ also the E28S with the F10S. This was a rather mind blowing challenge, because Sytze, the photographer directed us to driving in a close proximity whilst maintaining a fixed position at a fixed speed. This was worth in though as this resulted in a unique series of pictures that one doesn’t see every day.

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Peter also used the opportunity to experience each generation by himself. He first took a seat in the passenger seat for a few laps during which he took notes of the interview with the owners. He also used this to observe the owners comfort zone before taken the wheel himself. This was very professional and also respectful to the material, but when one of us challenged Peter to push the car to the limit, he didn’t resist a power-slide with the E39S though. During this part of the program, a second photographer took detailed pictures of each car in the track’s ‘centre-court’.

Shortly after half past eleven, there was some time left, so we took the opportunity of driving some ‘free’ laps whilst maintaining positions to allow the photographer to shoot some dynamic group pictures as well. In the last lap, the E60S suddenly dropped out of formation. We later heard that this was because of a sudden loss of electrical power caused by a broken alternator, which forced the car into entering its power-saving modes, just to gain enough time to find a safe spot.

After having lunch together with a bunch of Dutch finest, each of us went its own way. The feature appeared in issue 22 that was released last week.

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Discussion Starter #198 (Edited)
The 2014 season has been interesting and full of surprises. In an overview, #231 participated in the following events:

1: The fifth edition of the international Sharknose meeting in Arnhem, the Netherlands
2: The M event from the largest BMW and ///M dealer of the Netherlands; F Breeman in Rotterdam
3: The Eiffel trip of Jeroen’s BMW E21 network
4: The thirty year M5 special of Dutch magazine Autovisie that appeared as a nine-page feature in their 22nd issue of 2014.



Picture courtesy: Marc Nauta

All in all, a nice track-record for the year. I would have loved to add a short road-trip late in autumn, but the brake-revision project prevented doing so within the summer time. Even though the weather is very mild for the time of the year, it is just a matter of time before autumn really kicks in and driving conditions are not favourable for using her anymore, hence why I prepared her for winter-storage yesterday. Given the fact that yesterday was a beautiful autumn day, the apotheosis could not be higher.



Nevertheless, to every good day comes an end, so 1018231 now is parked next to BK02837 were they will both spend the winter underneath a car-cover.



Nevertheless, I want to share some pictures of the editorial day for the Autovisie feature in issue 22/2014. The first picture shows me driving 1018231 next to editor Peter H. in the F10 M5 ‘30Jahre M5 edition’. Both pictures were taken by Sytze Dijkstra Photography and have also been published on the Autovisie website.



The following picture, also from Sytze Dijkstra is a car to car shoot with the ‘Lagunengrun’ 1993 E34 M5 3.8 from Stefan M. (not a member). Both pictures were taken as part of the editorial day on the training premises of the Dutch police in Lelystad.



Unfortunately I wasn’t able to resolve the braking judder for that day. This project’s timeline simply didn’t fit in the time between the return of the Eiffel Tour early in September and the editorial day of Autovisie on the 26th of September, hence why this project could only be executed in the first three weeks of October. At the moment, I am still in the process of bedding the brakes but my first observations are promising; the unbalances and vibrations in the front suspension have disappeared and the feedback from the road to the steering wheel is better than ever.

This also applies to the response of the brakes. Even though the bedding process prevents me from exploring the brakes full performance, I observe an improved (smoother) response. For the upcoming period, I will focus on documenting the brake-project including all the possible options, their advantages and disadvantages. This is more than just writing notes with observations and opinions; I am still struggling to find a decent structure; when that is clear, I can go into the deep so it take some time before I can define lessons learnt and define a follow up (if any).



Last but not least; Elegance is no more than maintaining simplicity in design and with this picture, the 2014 driving season has closed. See you all again in 2015.
 

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Discussion Starter #199 (Edited)
It has been a while since I last shared an update about #231 in this thread. Just before it went in winter hibernation, I completed the brake-rebuild project to solve the brake-judder. However, soon after starting the hibernation period, I discovered two small leaks underneath the car. These were resolved in March 2015 by replacing the leaking clutch slave cylinder and rebuilding the hydraulic brake booster that suffered from a leaking low-pressure body seal. I plan to share a technical update, but I haven’t found the time to complete my project diary about this follow-up yet.



On the 11th of April, we participated in the spring meet & drive from the BMWE21.net ? Jeroen's BMW E21 Network | The world's No 1 E21 website! community in the Apeldoorn area. This event is not limited to owners of the BMW E21, but also to owners of other BMW models from the sharknose era. As part of the trip, we visited the Veluwsche Stroomtrein Maatschappij, a non-profit organization that maintains and operates old steam-powered Locomotives in the Netherlands.


(Picture courtesy: member bmwe21.net)

After enjoying lunch where I met another owner of an E28 M5 by coincidence, we resumed our driving tour through the Dutch countryside where Jeroen (a.k.a member bmwe21.net) took some great pictures of the cars.


(Picture courtesy: member bmwe21.net)


(Picture courtesy: member bmwe21.net)

The following picture is a nice action shot from behind with me following Gerrit in his lovely E21 Hartge 323i that also is a very impressive car.


(Picture courtesy: member bmwe21.net)
 

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Discussion Starter #200 (Edited)
Some time ago, I was asked if I would be willing to lend my E28 M5 to BMW the Netherlands for a classic car exhibition at the Amsterdam International auto show that is currently being held (16 till 26 April 2015) at the RAI exhibition centre. Since the exposure is relatively it was obvious that some agreements were made before committing….. But a long story short, #231 has taken the honours of participating in the top 75 classic cars that are displayed in booth 7.


(Picture courtesy: Classic BMW club of the Netherlands)


(Picture courtesy: Classic BMW club of the Netherlands)

The only other BMW on display in the classic exhibition is an early Neue Klasse from 1962. The organization of the Amsterdam International auto show was keen on getting their hands on an E28 M5 because it is now thirty years ago that the M5 was presented to the public in the 1985 event. As there aren’t that many around in Holland, let alone examples in presentable condition, they reverted back to a referral from the F. Breeman M event of June 2015 in which she participated as well.
 
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