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I bought my 2003 E39 M5 from a m5 board member about 4 years ago. Still love the car but believe I need to move to something more economical because I'm moving. When I registered the car in Florida (bought it in South Carolina) I was issued a exceeds mechanical limit title. What exactly does that mean? Am I going to have a hard time selling it now? Maybe I should have been asking this question 4 years ago instead of deciding what tires I should buy. Car has tons of service records and has always been well maintained. It looks and drives great even at close to 150k miles. What should I tell potential buyers when they ask? I believe a previous owner checked the exceeds mechanical limit on title to justify declaring a low price to avoid paying taxes on the car. I hope I put this post in the correct place. Thanks in advance.
 

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Exceeds mechanical limits should not even really apply to this car unless its crazy high mileage (like, unheard of mileage...)

On older cars some odometers only went to 5 digits. So once one of these cars rolled over 100,000 miles it would reset to 00,000. This is "exceeding the mechanical limits" of the odometer. It was meant to denote that the odometer is still rolling, but is not representative of the exact mileage of the car. Since the M5 cluster goes up to at least 6 digits (000,000), you either have a million mile M5 (which may be valuable in it's own right - lol!) or more likely, it was mislabeled at some point possibly because mileage was rolled back or tampered with. It will hurt the value of the car, and it is something you should have asked more questions about in the past. Not knowing why it was labelled like this on the title will certainly hurt the value, by how much its hard to say. You may be right it was declared exceeds mechanical limits to justify a low price tag to avoid taxes, but without knowing for sure (and even if that is true) value will still be lower than a clean "A box" title (A box indicates odometer is actual mileage, at least in my state).
 

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I bet you could go to the DMV and tell them you lost your title and need a replacement. The replacement title would probably show an odometer reading of "Exempt" since the car is now over 10 yrs old...
 

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I bought my 2003 E39 M5 from a m5 board member about 4 years ago. Still love the car but believe I need to move to something more economical because I'm moving. When I registered the car in Florida (bought it in South Carolina) I was issued a exceeds mechanical limit title. What exactly does that mean? Am I going to have a hard time selling it now? Maybe I should have been asking this question 4 years ago instead of deciding what tires I should buy. Car has tons of service records and has always been well maintained. It looks and drives great even at close to 150k miles. What should I tell potential buyers when they ask? I believe a previous owner checked the exceeds mechanical limit on title to justify declaring a low price to avoid paying taxes on the car. I hope I put this post in the correct place. Thanks in advance.
Here is a link to DMV for lost title:

Replacing Lost Florida Vehicle Title | Lost Florida Car Title | my-DMV Information made Easy

Alternatively, you can probably bring the car for a VIN check to show you have a 7 digit odometer, and the "exceeds mechanical limits" was incorrect.

Regards,
Jerry
 
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