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Discussion Starter #1
Just finished a couple month process to refresh the M5 and wanted to show some pictures and hopefully useful info. The car is a mid 2002 with 102k on it.

Some Before Symptoms:
* Lumpy-Batty exhaust.
* Consistent "offset torquing/vibration" felt thru the shifter and at idle touching the top of the plenum. Felt like the engine was twisting to the drivers side. Note the shifter has the weighted ZHP knob, so its much more "tappy" when vibrations come through.
* Occasional, wandering and jumpy throttle.
* Occasional, inconsistent steering feel.
* Infrequent, inconsistent clutch engagement, sometimes it wouldn't go far enough to let you into the next gear.
* Tapping most noticeable from under the car (leaning below the drivers door jam). Who knows if this was actually the rod bearings.
* Nasty exhuast vibration rattle, even after replacing midsection mounts.
* Almost stripped oil drain plug causing a slow oil leak. This would have failed if used again without repair.

The Process:
Removing everything went extremely well, Bolts were consistently torqued, and each system comes off pretty easily if you do it in a reasonable order. The only thing that presented some problem was the headers and the fact we left the AC compressor and exchanger attached to the car. Headers had to be removed to clear the AC without a ridiculously controllable engine crane. It's useful to label the wiring harness (mostly the starter, headlights, front bumper stuff), but that said, everything is so well fit that you can trace the wiring harness pretty easily. You just have to look for the tabs on the castings that hold the wiring clips and match connectors by color, pinout. The rest of the process was pretty well documented on TIS and beisan systems for the VANOS. Be sure to have two people when removing the splined shafts, someone to hold the weight of the vanos unit, while the other unscrews the shaft.

Issues Found:
* Crank Position Sensor was covered in magnetic dust. And had cracked open (brittle plastic).
* 6 of 8 rod side rod bearings had significant wear.
* The Secondary Air pipe (Silver tube above the water pump pulley) was about 80% clogged with carbon.
* Midsection of the exhaust is warped from front to back. That nasty rattle was actually the Drivers side Diff CV coupling hitting the exhaust since fitment there is already tight.
* Clutch and flywheel were in decent enough shape, probably some more life.
* The Clutch Fork was about punch through from the slave cylinder tip, Tons of material removed from the fork at the contact point.
* The transmission fork pin was pretty well crushed. To be replaced with a brass unit.
* The power steering pump had a pretty serious pumping issue. It would go light for 2 seconds, then the third second have huge resistance. We only found this on restarting the engine after repair. The entire belt was bucking the tensioners about an inch.
* The master to slave clutch pipe & hose assembly (annoyingly one piece) was about perished and tore easily on engine removal.

Results:
The exhaust is still a problem. I haven't replaced or straightened it, and trying to balance it out has actually caused more vibration in different places. I still have the one that sounds like something is hitting under the passenger seat, plus other misc tunnel rattles, etc. However, when the exhaust settles itself perfectly, the shifter is ridiculously smooth, vibrations through the drivetrain and engine are about 10% of the before, and engine "torquing" is now smooth, consistent, and non-cyclic. The clutch engages way closer to 50% of the pedal travel. Clutch is consistent, bitey, and very smooth. Helicoil on the oil drain plug is still leaking a bit, may try to run some gasket sealant in with another one since the contact patch is smaller for the crush washer. A threadcert would have been better here. A new power steering pump was installed after the belt chatter, this made a great improvement in overall feel, and may well have reduced unexplained engine vibration.

Minus those issues, the car is running better than it has since I got it 4 years, and 40k ago. All of the mysterious issues and particularly a good portion of vibrations, seem to be pretty well solved at this point.

Parts List
* Clutch (LuK), Flywheel (LuK), Brass Fork Pin, New Fork (BMW), Throwout Bearing (BMW, The LuK is way looser and will cause rattles), Slave Cylinder (FTE), Clutch Line (BMW). Rear Main Seal (BMW), Rear Main Cover Gasket (Victor Reinz)
* Rod Bearings (Blue and Red, BMW), Rod Bolts (BMW), Assorted O-rings for oil pump assembly, scavenge pumps, etc (BMW). Lower and Upper Oil Pan Gaskets (Elring)
* VANOS rebuild kit/many o-rings (Beisan Systems), Valve Cover Gaskets (Elring), Valve Cover Nut Rubber Washers (BMW)
* Bunches of Extra O-rings (Secondary Air Pipe, Power Steering Hoses, Etc.), Replacement Power Steering hose from steering unit to PS heat exchanger. Some DIY's say only do the reservoir ones, but this one is also prone to leaking. Just a major PITA with the engine in.

I think that's it. The process was daunting at first, but went smoothly being deliberate and taking time to research.
 

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Good work. Where did you get the brass clutch pin/ball and the flywheel tool if you don't mind me asking?
 

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Good work that man!

Great to see these great cars getting the love they deserve.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good work. Where did you get the brass clutch pin/ball and the flywheel tool if you don't mind me asking?
The brass clutch pin was from ECSTuning. The brand is called All German Auto/AGA. This piece takes some solid beating to get it pressed in.

Flywheel tool was just borrowed.
 

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Man, that's an ambitious job. Good work.
 

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The brass clutch pin was from ECSTuning. The brand is called All German Auto/AGA. This piece takes some solid beating to get it pressed in.

Flywheel tool was just borrowed.
If you drop the pin into liquid nitrogen, and warm the bell housing with a heat gun it slides in like it was meant to fit there. I suppose you could do the same with a can of cold spray, but liquid N2 is fun to use!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you drop the pin into liquid nitrogen, and warm the bell housing with a heat gun it slides in like it was meant to fit there. I suppose you could do the same with a can of cold spray, but liquid N2 is fun to use!
Yea, popping it into the freezer would have helped. I just didn't expect it to be that tight, and it was too far in by then.
 

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Respect. Awesome DIY job!
 

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More than a golf clap. :smile

I've got the luk kit sitting in the kitchen. I was wondering why I should or shouldn't replace the fork. Thanks for answering that question. I guess a brass pin and some liquid nitrogen are now required. :|


What part of CO? I'm between Denver and Boulder.


Much respect.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
More than a golf clap. :smile

I've got the luk kit sitting in the kitchen. I was wondering why I should or shouldn't replace the fork. Thanks for answering that question. I guess a brass pin and some liquid nitrogen are now required. :|


What part of CO? I'm between Denver and Boulder.


Much respect.
Just west of Denver. Would be happy to drop by and help when you get going, just send me a PM.

No new timing chain guides? :eek
Given cost I figured I would save the chain guides until after confirm this stuff was a success. Mainly since chain guides can be done more easily from the front with the engine in, especially when I need a new water pump or something. Extra work yes, but now I'm way more comfortable working on it.
 

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...I just didn't expect it to be that tight, and it was too far in by then.


Anyway, great project. I wish that I had the kind of time that it takes to do this. If you don't mind my asking, are you willing to share approximately what this project set you back?
 
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Discussion Starter #15


Anyway, great project. I wish that I had the kind of time that it takes to do this. If you don't mind my asking, are you willing to share approximately what this project set you back?
Lol.

I've attached the parts list for the Bearings & Clutch. Beyond that, VANOS seals, shipping, fluids, filters, and power steering replacement, and repair on a VANOS solenoid. So all said and done, it's good to be prepared to spend well more than those two lists. :wink
 

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WOW~! I am in awe of the work you did there OP!

:clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:

How long did whole endeavour take? What special tools other than the clutch tool did you need to purchase? By the way, since you mentioned somewhere that your SAS line was clogged, did you bother to check and possible drill out the SA passages in the heads.

This seems like quite a daunting task, but I would love to be able to do it.
 

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Lol.

I've attached the parts list for the Bearings & Clutch. Beyond that, VANOS seals, shipping, fluids, filters, and power steering replacement, and repair on a VANOS solenoid. So all said and done, it's good to be prepared to spend well more than those two lists. :wink
I aim to please :)

Thanks for the info! It is refreshing to see that I'm not the only nut that is utilizing Excel for my projects. I've got an Excel workbook with everything I have put into my Beast, including the acquisition cost. Helps to keep me grounded and prioritize the right projects.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
WOW~! I am in awe of the work you did there OP!

:clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:

How long did whole endeavour take? What special tools other than the clutch tool did you need to purchase? By the way, since you mentioned somewhere that your SAS line was clogged, did you bother to check and possible drill out the SA passages in the heads.

This seems like quite a daunting task, but I would love to be able to do it.
I started right at the end of May, mostly working on weekends one or two days. I took it pretty slow on the important stuff like rod bearings, since it's fairly easy to loose focus with all the work and brake clean..

For the SAS, I'd recommend making sure the front two cylinder's exhaust ports are closed. Then use a pick or screw driver to pull the clumps out and spray it with some brake cleaner. That cleaned, most of the other carbon was in the silver aluminum pipe that goes on the front of the engine. This was easy enough to take outside and powerwash and brake clean it until it was good.

As far as daunting. Yes and no. I decided to rebuild an M50 first to limit cost of failure and gain some experience. With a decent understanding of how to do the processes, you'd be surprised how thoughtfully designed the S62 is.
 
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