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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After TMR delivered the freshly rebuild engine just a week ago (see this thread about the engine rebuild), I can prepare myself for the reinstallation of the heart of #231. I have scheduled this task for Saturday September the 26th, but before that can take place I have to replace some parts.



Since the water-pump has been replaced by a main dealer in 2002 and since then, only 3000km have been added to #231, I expected the old water pump to be in excellent condition. But when I removed the existing pump prior to pulling-out the engine block in December 2008, I was surprised (and shocked) by the condition of the rotor, hence why I had to by a new one. The following picture shows the old-and new water pumps. Suffice to say which one is which!



The rotor itself is not made from a very high quality material; it’s cast from some sort of steel-alloy that is prone to minerals. I suspect that in 2002, the main dealer just added the common 50/50 mix of plain water with glycol-based anti-freeze. The problem with glycol is that its cooling-capacity is roughly 70%, hence why it is mixed with plain water. Although this is a factory approved filling the quality of crane-water differs from source to source. After a mere 1000km and 2.5years, I drained the coolant system entirely and filled it with a low mineral coolant which although more expensive gives a much better protection to corrosion. This was either too late or not sufficient.

Judging from the date code on the old clutch-plate, it was installed in 1986. If one compares the abrasive material on both sides (red arrows), one can clearly see that the thickness on both sides is different. Based on this fact, I estimated that its remaining service life at roughly 10000km.



Given the low annual mileage of #231, 10000km equates to two to three years, but with the upcoming break-in phase in 2010, I have to drive at least 5000km. Chances are that I have to replace the clutch one way or the other so I decided to install a new OEM clutch whilst the engine is out of the car. The following picture shows the new clutch-plate in the box. Clearly visible is the thickness of the abrasive material.



A side-note: Given the fact that many of our E28 M5’s have been manufactured in the eighties, I do not know for sure weather or not the original clutch is asbestos free. Therefore, use extreme caution when removing the old clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I managed to install some auxiliary parts to the engine this evening. I started with the water pump and its seal. The six M6 bolts are bolted with a torque of 10Nm. Please note that the engine-shackle has been removed to gain the required clearance.



The next part is the engine-shackle. There are two bolts. One M6x65 (10Nm) and one M8x65 (22Nm).



Since the old heat-shield was cracked, I bought a new one. Its fitting is straightforward.



Last but not least the new Sachs clutch. I aligned the clutch-plate visually, but will check this with the alignment tool that is confirmed for delivery on Tuesday. When that is done, I can tighten the pressure group with the six inside-hexagon bolts.



I decided to wait with the exhaust manifolds until the engine is in the car to have a better maneuverability of the engine and gearbox combo.
 

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Based on this fact, I estimated that its remaining service life at roughly 10000km.

Given the low annual mileage of #231, 1000km equates to two to three years, but with the upcoming break-in phase in 2010, I have to drive at least 5000km.
For the purpose of clarity Ray , should this figure be 10,000km ?

The water pump pictures are just one indication of the effects that minimal use result in with relation to these cars , which I believe benefit far more from regular driving !

Great pics as usual Ray , thanks for sharing and good luck with the installation .........the exhaust manifolds should be fun !

D
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
My clutch-plate alignment tool arrived yesterday, a day earlier as planned. It’s a rather simple device that allows the centering of the plate to the pressure group before assembly on the flywheel. The centering is required as otherwise the gearbox prise-shaft won't fit.



After the alignment, I fastened the (8.8 classed) six fillister-head screws with 24Nm (Note that the S38 uses 10.9 class that have to be torqued with 37Nm).



The next item on my agenda is the replacement of the prise-shaft-seal. The old part leaked causing a small spill in the bell house and on my floor.



The old seal popped out without much hassle. I cleaned and sanded the mating area of the seal to remove the surface rust before press-fitting the new seal.



The price shaft cover with seal in situ with new bolts and washers. Note the small plastic ball-pin to the right. This is the stop for the release-bearing lever and should be replaced when replacing the clutch.



The release bearing, the release-bearing lever and the spring-clip installed. The prise-shaft needs to be greased, but when that is done, the gearbox is ready for its marriage to the engine.



Last but not least; the new shifter-lever with bearing. The new part is a few centimeters shorter than the old one, but matches the one from the later E28S M5’s. This should be an improvement.

 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
After last weeks preparations, a small team consisting myself and members Billie_S38, RobertK and Javier installed the freshly rebuild original engine in #231. I hoped to make some more pictures of the entire process, but as it was a labor-intensive job I a only managed to shoot four pictures today so the detailed pictures will follow later.

We started with the assembly of the gearbox to the engine, which was not really difficult, but we had to make sure the crankshaft wasn't moved. Prior to the assembly, the prise-shaft and the relevant surfaces of the fork-lever were greased with molycote. All new Torx bolts have been used. There are eleven of them with different sizes, but you'll need sockets E10 and E12. The M8 bolts are fastened with 22Nm, the M10 bolts with 43Nm.



With the gearbox installed, the engine crane needed to lift ~300kg. This exceeds the only usable capacity of the crane to lift the engine high enough. It took us some puzzling to figure out the best way to proceed and here member Javier provided very valuable insight with his hands-on experience. Member Billie_S38 was underneath the car to properly align the propeller shaft to the gearbox. Member Javier positioned the engine with help of member RobertK whilst I operated the engine crane and supplied the required material.



After about an hour, the engine was at its final place after which we took some time for a coffee break and to take a look at Javi82's E34S M5 and some petrol talk. As said, more detailed pictures will follow later.

Last but not least: Many thanks to members Javier, Billie_S38 and RobertK for the valuable help and assistance. :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
In a previous post, I reported about the reuniting of the original M88/3 engine with the chassis of #231. In an offline exchange of thoughts with member Javier, we discussed about the best approach to install the engine.

Javier preferred to install the engine with the exhaust manifolds preinstalled whilst I preferred to install the engine with the gearbox installed. Both gearbox and manifolds preinstalled won’t fit from above so I had to make a choice. Although I have to agree with him that it the gearbox imposes less constraints for installing afterwards compared to the exhaust manifolds, I decided against that as I am not accustomed to lifting a +50kg gearbox above my head, nor do I want to ask that from other people as well.

The exhaust manifolds are extremely light by comparison, but are not a serviceable part. The constraints are the limited amount of space between the front wheel arches, the tubing for the AC system and the engine itself. This constraint can be waived by lifting the engine from underneath. I found it convenient to keep lift at roughly 1.5mtr so I could reach the exhaust manifolds from underneath. I lifted the engine with the engine-crane and a wooden block to prevent damage.



The second constraint is the limited amount of space to tighten the 9mm copper nuts. It’s a time-consuming and PITA job, but by installing the manifolds one at the time, only two nuts are difficult to reach. The other nuts on the bottom can be reached from underneath which is possible with the car lifted.



Although the existing engine mounts were in pretty good shape, I didn’t bother and replaced them nonetheless.



Please note that it appears as if the parts catalogue does not list the left engine mount as available, but these share the same position with a drop-down handle in the explosion view after which two separate part numbers are listed.

 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
By installing the exhaust manifolds one at a time, I hoped to simplify the fastening of at least two of the difficult 9mm nuts. This didn’t really work out as the manifold of cylinders #4, #5 and #6 imposes significant constraints to the correct installation of the other exhaust manifold. It can be done, but it requires the removal of the right engine mount and its support, heat shield and the alloy frame for the distributor.

The engine then needs to be lifted high enough to gain the required clearance for a correct feed-through of the long exhaust manifold for cylinders #1, #2 and #3. I used the AC-pump bracket as lifting point.



After some puzzling, the bugger was ready for the final installation. However the header from the fourth cylinder is a few millimeters too thick for maneuvering the header from the third cylinder onto the exhaust ports with the bolt-ends installed.



Having said that, I am happy to have replaced all the bolt-ends as well as I had only one option left; unbolting the already installed manifold to waive the constraints for the other manifold. This cost me about half an hour after which both manifolds were pre-fitted to the cylinder head..



Fastening the twenty-four nuts required another 1.5hour and various tools including half-open and closed 9mm wrenches and small ¼” ratchet with the proper extension tools. Fastening these nuts is more easily with the engine lifted as far as possible, so I kept the engine-lift underneath the bracket for the AC-pump. At half-past eleven yesterday evening, the job was done.

 

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~!

Raymond,

Everything seems to be coming together well for you including the helpful assistance from your friends.

Cant help thinking if it was pretty awkward to fit the manifolds on your vehicle, how bad is it going to be on a RHD with the steering box adding to the woes ?, oh well lets hope we dont find out !.

Wishing you good fortune with the remaining minor tasks to complete, & following your thread with interest as are others.

BTW the engine looks amazing probably better finish than new !.

Cheers

Fishy
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I took a picture from underneath to show the recent progress.



1: I reinstalled the heat shields on the exhaust side (green arrows). I replaced the heatshield on the engine mount (light green arrow) as the old part was *******. Although it would be nice to replace all the heatshields with new parts, this was not really necessary as the two other heatshields were OK.

2: As can be seen, the PAS-pump and AC-pump (red arrows) are still kept in place by securing-belts. I have placed an order for all the required parts to assemble these on their respective brackets. The PAS-pump and the AC-pump require refurbishment before reinstallation.

3: The slave cylinder (blue arrow) has yet to be refitted. I will replace it in the future, but not right now as I have set explicit goals to avoid unnecessary work in the context of this engine-rebuild.

4: The small orange arrow points to one of the oil-channels. I have seen pictures were this opening is covered by a nut and I have seen some pictures were this is not. The parts catalogue does not list any part so I have placed this subject on the outstanding issue list.

5: I also will not replace any suspension parts, even though they are now easily accessible. They are beyond the scope of this project. My focus is finishing it. After the #231 passes the break-in phase, I will reassess their condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Cant help thinking if it was pretty awkward to fit the manifolds on your vehicle, how bad is it going to be on a RHD with the steering box adding to the woes ?, oh well lets hope we dont find out !.
You certainly have a point there, even though that I know that the headers for the RHD and LHD variants are different to allow the steering-box to be fitted on RHD cars. This simply is not possible with the LHD headers.

Wishing you good fortune with the remaining minor tasks to complete, & following your thread with interest as are others.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
The next step on my ‘to-do’ list is the reconnection of the shifter mechanism. Two weeks ago, we analyzed that the gearbox rod joint caused some play in the movement of the shifter-rod in the longitude direction (yellow arrow). The play in vertical direction (purple arrow) is negligible.



Despite that the cost of this part is far from excessive, it also is not negligible so after some deliberation, I bought a new one. A comparison between both old-and new parts revealed that the hole is eccentric, i.e. the longitude play is normal. A visual comparison did not result in any differences, but for 22 Euro, I could not bother. Note the two O-rings that cannot be seen, but are not supplied with the rod-joint.



The other (lower) purple arrow shows a completely deteriorated plastic washer that fills the gap between the gearbox-rod joint and the gearbox shifting-shaft. Even though the connecting rod itself fixes the gearbox rod joint to some extent, the eccentric hole allows the rod itself some movement and without a functional washer also a slight additional movement around the vertical axis. This plastic washer prevents additional transversal load to the shift-rod seal in the gearbox. These are known to leak, even after replacement, but I sincerely doubt many workshops are aware of the plastic washer in the gearbox-rod joint. Always replace this part whilst you’re at it.

The gearbox rod-joint and the plastic washer are not the only parts in the system that need to be checked. This also applies for the bushings in the shifter arm on the gearbox. Especially on cars that have seen ‘appropriate use’ these rubber bushes can cause sloppy and inaccurate shifting-feel. The bush itself doesn’t cost much, but is very difficult to reach with the gearbox in place.



Measurements learned that the play in #231’s old bushes is about ±2mm. Since I have the entire shifting linkage out of the car, replacing the bush was easy. I cleaned the arm, added a tiny amount of lubricant and pushed the new bush in place.



The fixing clip is the reason why it is close to impossible to replace this bushing with the gearbox in place. It is located at the top of the gearbox, i.e. no working space to apply enough force to lift the clip from the alloy housing.



The following picture shows the shifter arm with the new shifter (shorter model) before these are installed.



As the bushes are the parts that wear out, the shifter-arm and the shifter-rod can be reused. Last but not least, I finished the shift-linkage with a new boot (the old one was *******).



Even though I cannot give driving impressions, the first tests (dry shifting) revealed a much tighter and more precise gear-change.
 

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Looks all good Raymond! Keep up the good work!
 

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Just about the best thread(s) on the whole board. Thanks Ray.

btw, my gearbox on the e34 was changed while the donk was rebuilt, also took the opportunity to renew all linkage bushings etc.
 

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Following this once again with great intrest :) Awesome, definitely THE M88/3 reference thread on the internet, together with the LHD #231 engine rebuild thread!
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Work is slowly but steadily progressing. Yesterday evening, I finished the installation of the propeller-shaft to the gearbox. The hardy disk and the three M12 bolts were replaced in April 2008. As these have been used no more then 500km, I reused the hardy-disk and the bolts. The self-locking hex nuts have been replaced though. Unlike the E34S M5, the bolts are 8.8 rated. With other words, torque them at 81Nm instead of 110Nm.



The PAS-pump has been cleaned and inspected after which new brackets were fitted.



The PAS-pump back in its place; the spanner rail and idler have been replaced with new parts not only for cosmetic reasons, but also to allow easy and precise adjustment. The old parts simply were corroded to much.



Many thanks to member Miles for the pictures of #411 that he send me two days ago. I didn’t make enough pictures whilst disassembling the PAS-pump and AC-pump so his pictures were a much needed reference for the reinstallation of the PAS-pump.

The following picture shows the main-earth cable (red arrow) and the PAS-pump back in place (green arrow).



The next item on the list is the installation of the AC-pump.
 

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Simply amazing. When do you think you can do a first test run/drive ? Should basically feel like driving a brand new car...

Had some rather annoying problems with my M88/3, cost a small fortune to fix, and I still feel like the engine does not idle the way it should. Intermittent vibrations to the interior, but maybe that's normal for these cars ? What's the correct idling speed for an M88/3 anyway ?
Also when you ease off the gas pedal when driving lower speeds, she kind of shakes a bit, as if she's saying 'come on, step on it'.

Bottomless money pit these cars, or so I've heard :D
 
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