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Very cool! Will the 17" Style 21's clear this setup or do you need 18's? Do you feel a noticeable difference to the OEM brakes?
 

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I applaud the OP for posting this little-known setup, but there is a lack of information here I would respectfully counter in a PSA (Public Service Announcement) sense. I hope this post is taken informationally, and with the respect it is intended.

I did not intend to comment further in the thread, but seeing the other interested parties posting prompted me to bring up the important specs of this custom setup, so potential followers are at least fully informed before they seek to replicate.

The fact remains that this setup gains a ton of weight compared to stock or aftermarket BBKs, for questionable and limited advantage.

The front setup alone adds a solid 12+ lbs extra unsprung weight at each front corner, compared to stock. The single advantage OP's car now has is excess thermal capacity, designed for a ~4200lb empty, 500hp car. But that's about all larger rotors are good for (at least when combined with equally upsized rear rotors, negating any real change in clamping force). While that could certainly be construed as an advantage, there are far better and easier ways to achieve better thermal capacity, braking performance, and actual braking improvement - without the death knell of 30% extra unsprung weight! Consider that in almost all scenarios, the E60-based brake system is less useful to the E34 than the stock setup.

Now, the OP has admitted the purpose was mainly for looks, and if that is your goal, this is a fine way to obtain a larger rotor. It is still confusing to me, because 99% of show cars have multi-piston calipers; but if simply having larger rotors is your thing, this is a great solution for you - but at least ask yourself why you want a larger rotor, and consider the drawbacks.

On the subject of more effective upgrades, consider that those E60 front calipers weigh double what a comparable fixed-piston Brembo calipers weighs. The OP is misinformed; multi-piston calipers are almost always lighter than sliding calipers, not the other way around, as he stated.

Happy to take this discussion offline, and again, I do not mean to trash the OP. But seeing others' interest in this setup has raised a flag, and this thread was lacking in real facts so far. I hope this helps.

Cheers!
 

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Looks like the adapter was made on a CNC plasma?

I can appreciate the desire to retrofit the E60-M5 rear calipers on your M5.
I can relate to that desire, as I have been exploring the options for a larger (heat dissipating) rotor for the rear of my M5 even after I fitted my M5 with the Euro 1995, M5 328x20mm rotors way back in 1997.
In the effort to do my due diligence, I have done my share of engineering calculations for brake torque, weight transfer, brake bias and rotor temperature rise; based on a single brake application at various speeds. All this on systems initially engineered by BMW and ATE.
With that: ATE designed the caliper carrier and BMW the designed swing arm caliper carrier mounts out of high compression strength cast iron in order to engineer a structure that was rigid enough to survive the maximum possible shock loads created by the weight of the vehicle and the highest possible tire traction imposed on the brake assembly, plus the desired safety factor, all proven by rigorous testing of the strength of the materials on an engineered assemble.

I am no ground vehicle brake system engineer and you can take my comments with a grain of salt.
But, with all due respect, I wanted to post my concern:
Modifying the rear brake assemble by adding a E60-M6 massive caliper/rotor system that is capable of generating 150% of the brake torque of Euro E34-M5 328x20mm brake system from the same pedal force may challenge the engineering of the swing arm rear caliper carrier 10mm bolt mounting points. Like wise using a malleable steel adapter may create the opportunity for metal fatigue over time and produce caliper misalignment or detachment during heavy braking.
FWIW, late model M3's and M5's do have some massive calipers and rotors!!
All the best!!
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Have already few hundredths of miles on the new set of brakes and i can tell that I’m really happy with the results, I’m not telling anyone to put this kit or saying that this kit is the best in the world. But like I said it’s very simple to go and get some big kits from brembo or Ap racing, pay 5-7k and have them on. This to me is more attractive and interesting. On my other e34 i have the f80 caliper and 370mm f30 rotor brakes and i can say that e60 are better and firmer pedal.
938183
 
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