BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

I'm sure there has been much written on this topic but hoping to have the answer to my questions distilled down to the basics by those of you who have had this work performed on your cars or who are otherwise well-versed on the topic.

I have a 2003 M5 with 171K on the clock, I am the 2nd local owner. The car has been meticulously maintained its entire life and runs fantastically. The oil has never been tested for signs of rod bearing wear and I have only been recently been made aware of that as a means of assessment. In discussions with the owner of a local independent BMW repair shop of high repute (who himself owns a 2003 M5), he suggested to me that if I really lintended to keep the car as a daily driver, that given it's high mileage, rather than initiating periodic oil testing and monitoring at this stage and mileage, that I should seriously consider having the rod bearings replaced to avoid catastrophic engine failure later. I am considering having this work done.

I will be asking the shop these same questions but wanted to run these by the M5 enthusiasts here for feedback first;

1. When having the rod bearings replaced, is it recommended to use the stock BMW replacement bearings and associated components or are there other aftermarket components that are believed to be superior? Since the original bearings have 171K on them and have not failed yet- it seems like BMW repacements would be just fine. Nevertheless, I thought I'd pose the question to you all.

2. What is the basic list of items that should be replaced "while you are in there" when having a rod bearing job?

Thanks in advance!

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
My advice would be to do the oil analysis. It is easy to do and 1/100th the cost. There are many examples of M5's over 200K miles running original bearings. Especially given your car has been meticulously maintained. Sounds like your highly reputable shop is trying to siphon your wallet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
highly suggest looking into WPC treated OEM rod bearings. This is a special metal treatment (not a coating) that has many benefits without modifying the thickness. I got mine from ECSTuning.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
+1

You can get pre-treated WPC bearings from a variety of places now. You can try to send them directly to WPC as well though I do not know how much it will cost.

highly suggest looking into WPC treated OEM rod bearings. This is a special metal treatment (not a coating) that has many benefits without modifying the thickness. I got mine from ECSTuning.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,740 Posts
Not a bad idea to keep any motor running longer, but not a real issue with the S62. Typically these are swapped early if it’s a high rev or F/I engine and it’s an ongoing thing every x**** miles pending engine calibration. All depends on where you are on the OCD scale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,467 Posts
I don't think your shop is trying to squeeze your wallet. You asked him for advice on the potential issue and he gave the safe answer. That's the way I look at it if I was the owner and someone asked me. It's not like the guy fear mongered and said holy **** you need to do these now before it blows up!

Re: questions - In summary, all OE BMW parts are recommended for the work. There are lists on the board showing what's a good idea to replace.

For my unsolicited opinion, I'd say get a history of oil analysis going first. Daily driving these engines is best for their longevity. Get a few oil changes (normal intervals) and see what the reports start to say after 2-3 changes. You will need that many to get an idea what your "metals" look like as a norm. Then you can see if the metals change, there might be an issue. As others have said, if the car was well maintained, it was probably driven with some mechanical sympathy as well. As a single data point, my car is sitting at 295,000 on the original bearings and timing guides. She runs good and has great oil pressure (I have a mechanical gauge installed).
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top