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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Maintenance list E28S M5 (#231)

Gents,

Below, you will find a summary of the work that has been carried out on my E28S (#231) since the time that I have bought it in April 2001. This is not an overtly detailed list as one can find elsewhere on this board, but merely a summary of the points that a well preserved E28S needs. Most of all these points were completed with new nuts, bolts, gaskets, seals, O-rings etc etc.

Annual mileage: Between 400 and 800 kilometers.

To do list:

Functional:
1. Repair the head-light cleaning wipers
2. Replace airflow meter
3. Repair OEM alarm system
4. Replace Ground return cable between engine and chassi
Optical:
1. Paint the inside of the battery compartment.
2. Replace the isolation of the (engine-)hood.
Chassis:
1. Remove surface rust on the inside of the (engine-)hood.
Interior:
1. Replace the volume control button from the BMW Bavaria C radio
Safety:
1. Replace brake fluid.

Completed list.

Functional:
38. 20070501: Water temperature sensor of the DME replaced; all connectors of the water sensor replaced.
37. 20051001: Ignition coil replaced
36. 20050609: O-ring and gasket of the oil return line replaced
35. 20050609: Idle speed and CO emmision adjusted
34. 20050609: Basic adjustment TB synchronization completed.
33. 20050609: Small oil service with filter and Castrol TWS 10W60
32. 20050401: Alarmlight switch replaced
31. 20050401: Throttle bowden cable replaced
30. 20050301: All hoses of the heater system replaced
29. 20050301: All hoses and pipes of the coolant system replaced
28. 20050301: All hoses of the vacuum system replaced
27. 20050301: Thermostat replaced
26. 20050301: Coolant reservoir replaced
25. 20050301: Heater-valve replaced
24. 20050301: Radiator mounts replaced
23. 20050201: Throttle bodies (TB's) replaced
22. 20050201: Hydraulic hoses of the PS replaced.
21. 20050201: Hydrolic Oil reservoir replaced.
20. 20050201: Horns replaced
19. 20050301: Headlight aim adjust assembly replaced
18. 20050201: Firewall replaced.
17. 20050201: All fuel hoses replaced
16. 20050201: Fuel pressure regulator replaced
15. 20050201: Fuel injector rail overhauled and powder coated
14. 20050201: Intake plenum cleaned
13. 20050201: All hoses and gaskets between the intake plenum and TB’s replaced.
12. 20050201: Fuel injectors ultrasonically cleaned and tested
11. 20020219: Full Inspection II service (with Castrol TWS 10W60).
10. 20020219: gearbox mounts replaced
9. 20020210: gearbox shift linkage and driceshaft linkage replaced.
8. 20020219: Differential mount replaced.
7. 20020219: Fuel filter replaced
6. 20020219: Waterpump replaced
5. 20020219: Upper and lower radiator hoses replaced
4. 20011203: Spark plugs replaced by Bosch X5DC
3. 20010726: Batteries on SI board replaced
2. 20010623: Air filter enclosure replaced.
1. 20010501: Engine hood locks replaced.

Optical:
1. 20010623: Rev gauge replaced

Chassis:
7. 20010925: Front and rear bumpers replaced
6. 20010917: Front screen replaced with the correct part.
5. 20010917: Chrome listing of the front and rear windows replaced.
4. 20010811: Small rust-hole behind the rear bumper removed.
3. 20010811: Rear side repainted
2. 20010811: Front spoiler repainted
1. 20010811: Surface rust from the ‘jack-stands’ removed

Safety:
3. 20020529: New Michelin Pilot Sport tyres.
2. 20020219: Brake disks and pads replaced
1. 20020219: Front Brake calipers overhauled
 

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Raymond

I've experienced some of these things on M535's too.

Both mine and the last customer one I had in had trouble with the water level indication. I've taken the childish simple sender out of the expansion tank and checked it for operation, but still mine has the BC Kühlwasser light on all the time and the other M535i also has had intermittant failure with this.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Yes Wout,

I agree that many of these points apply for other E28 models as well and are often overlooked. IMHO, when maintaining these cars, TLC and preventive repairs must be approached as a project based on a list of necessary and optional repairs and recommended corrections.

I work with these simple lists to carry out my work. Some points have a low priority and may be skipped when appropriate. Based on my 'to-do' list, I determine the parts that I need for which I don't limit myself to the part that needs replacement. At the same time, I also order all the required nuts & bolts, gaskets etc etc. This not only is functional but also adds to optical perfection.
 

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Great thread Raymond , thanks for posting ......

How complex is the replacement of batteries on the s.i. board ?
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Hey David,

It's rather easy.

1: Remove the steering wheel to get an easy access to the instrment cluster.
2: Remove the instrument cluster (unscrew the two philips head scews on the dashboard cover).
3: Open the instrument cluster
4: The SI board is visible. Inspect it and check the batteries. If they have leaked, they need replacement. In a worst case scenario, the prined circuit board base material has been damaged by leaking accid. Depending on the accid intrusion, it may be possible to repair the printed circuit board, but worst case, you need a new SI board.
5: If the printed circuit board is OK, you simply unsolder the old batteries with a soldering iron. Install the new batteries and you are done.

All that takes is some basic electronics skills, but make sure that you use an appropriate soldering iron and tin suitable for soldering electronics. I use a thermostat controlled, temperature adjustable 30Watt soldering iron and PbSnAg solder. RoHs legitlation forbids the use of Pb (=lead), but this only applies for new products after June 2006. For old products lead still is allowed and prefered for it's slightly lower melting temperature.

Raymond
 

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Raymond,

Would you recommend replacing the batteries as a proactive maintenance measure or would you just replace them when they die?

Regards,

Bayerische
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Raymond,

Would you recommend replacing the batteries as a proactive maintenance measure or would you just replace them when they die?

Regards,

Bayerische
Definetelly a preventive acton as you don't want the batteries to leak. The anti solder mask on the printed circuit board is not resistant to the leaking accid.

Applies to all E28's as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
E28S M5 #231, wrenching time.

Gents,

As some of you know, I hardly drive my E28S and purely maintain it as a garage queen. This has the advantage of keeping a timecapsule that reflects the factory delivery state, but from a technical point of view, aging takes its toll. Garage queens also require regular care and inspections to keep them in a reliable condition for use.

Despite that condition wise my E28S is in much better shape then my E34S ('2' vs '3'), my E34S is better suited for demanding trips. As part of a pre-registration inspection I put my E28S on the lift to check suspension and other parts.



On the lift.



Rear suspension stabilizer links. These cost virtually nothing to replace.



Rear axle ABS sensor and actuators have surface corrosion. This may be the reason why the ABS fails above 220km/h.



Right front side. Not bad for a 22year old car. The nut will be replaced with a stainless steel part. The friction problem between steel and stainless steel will be solved by adding a lubricant like 'never-seez'. The corrosion on the welding is not that bad as it can be cleaned and treated with a sinc-primer before touching up with '203'.


Front exhaust mount is coroded. Also cheap to replace, but it is better waiting untill the exhaust needs replacement.
 

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Hi Ray
All those rubber bushes in the suspension is a perishable regardless of wether
you drive the car or not.:sad1:

Things that concern me are the internal parts of the Powertrain.
In particular, those cars that are on very thin synthetic oil & not started
& run for long periods ( ie 2-3 months) all seem to display early & excessive
wear on camshaft lobes.

Of the cars I have seen, there always tends to be little pitting on the lobes &
shim plates of cars used regularly, & those that are summer only or second cars but
not used in Winter seem to show much more wear than the mileage would suggest !

Not conclusive, I admit
I continue to gather pictorial evidence & document it.
(Note the shim plate in the second pic had been previously been moved
or inserted into the engine on two previous occasions with wear on both faces.)

I completely agree, that even the cherished cars that see only summer & dry
weather use, will see some deterioration unless care is constant & meticulous.
Your stunning example is used in Northern Europe, so the task is harder than
perhaps a car kept California or Florida maybe ?

Cheers
Farrell
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Of the cars I have seen, there always tends to be little pitting on the lobes & shim plates of cars used regularly, & those that are summer only or second cars but not used in Winter seem to show much more wear than the mileage would suggest !
You are spot on with this and I have to admit that my E34S suffers from the same.





I have posted these pictures in this thread in the E34 section roughly ten months ago. It's lack of lubrication. I still am undecided about what to do as it doesn't make sense to replace the camshafts without understanding the problem. Untill then, I will check cam lobe wear each year.

Not conclusive, I admit
I continue to gather pictorial evidence & document it.
(Note the shim plate in the second pic had been previously been moved
or inserted into the engine on two previous occasions with wear on both faces.)
Nope, but I have read about similar cases on the German forum, but those who posted the pics didn't share the conditions and usage other then using TWS oil. I checked my camlobes in spring 2006 and in spring 2007 and both times, the lobes were dry as hell, i.e no oil-film was present on the lobes to protect them during the vital first rotations when oil pressure increases before it settles to operating conditions. I do not believe that TWS oil is bad, after all there are many E34S, E46S, E39S and E60S running on that without problem. I have no evidence to support, but I suspect that TWS has been develloped for cars that are used on a daily basis and not for cars that see long periods of 'sleep'.

On the other hand. My fathers Audi A6 received four new camshafts in March 2007 as part of an extensive engine rebuild and according to the VAG dealer, camshafts like these are still OK and could be reused. As they only coste 190 Euro each, we had them replaced. note that this car has been used for an average of 30k per years since 1999 and has been dealer serviced from day one.



Although new S38 camshafts cost 418 Euro ex VAt each, I want to have a solution of the lubrication problem first. But as I have no access to lubrication specialists, nor are there any in my network, I have to do with personal opinions and preferences. IMHO, the basic problem/solution is rather simple; what additive is needed to maintain a strong protective oil-film over long period of time without the need to run the engine on a weekly or monthly basis ? And what manufacturer offers such a solution ?
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)


The E28S gearbox mounts are so much more rugged then those on the E34S, but given the height difference I doubt that these would fit the later model.



Why install a new differential-mount and not replace the bolt ? For the record, the gearbox mount was replaced in 2002 when I had this work carried out by a main dealer.



Same here. New fuel-filter, but the heavily correded connection piece of Euro 0.89 was not replaced. Again a dealer job.



The exhaust seems to have lived its longest time.



New AFM to replace the old one with a worn airflow sensor.
 

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Hi Ray
I am sorry that your camshafts are displaying this wear pattern.
But, you appear to be in good company with many other owners.
Lots of pics do tell a story.:applause:
I have other pics from other vehicles that also display similar pitting.
They were intermittant use vehicles also.

I am not or ever will be a lubrication Engineer.
I know of several cars that are exhibiting this problem even with a 10w semi-synthetic oil.
Not exotic in any way.

However, the wear pattern of the lobes & the drain down is an issue that will
only be avoided imho, 1 of 3 ways ( currently)

1. Start the car once a week & run it.

2. Grease the cam lobes & shim plates before you put the car away for the
winter so when you first key on, theres no metal to metal contact.
The oil wil dissolve the grease & most will do an oil change after winter ???

3. After a long lay up for the vehicle, remove cam cover & manually turn
the engine & oil the cams & shims in the process.

I would also add that I have seen this type of engine run for years with a little
pitting on the cam lobes.
I would suggest that once the pitting becomes a complete string across the
load bearing face of the camshaft, then maybe change:dunno:

I have yet to see the failure mode of cam lobe break up on this engine.
I would not want to be the first one to have this happen to me.
Same goes for any other fellow member.
Do you watch & wait or do you change & pre-empt a failure that may
never happen !

Camshafts are expensive...but cheap compared to a complete engine rebuild.

Cheers
Farrell
 

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An interesting post. I wonder whether an oil such as Castrol 'Magnatec' would help to retain oil throughout the winter for the start up it has a clingy consistency.

I have got into the habit of using the 'code' on the computer to avoid the engine firing up. This way the pump is distributing the oil before being put under load although I can see that dry metal to metal surfaces could still be damaged...

I find that by keeping the garage queens in the 'air flow bags' that the surface rust does not develop but my experience with everyday drivers is such that once the yellow pasivate has worn off the fixings nothing will stop the corrosion as shown on Raymonds car.

I have become very interested (due to owning a number of the classic BMW's) on how best to preserve the undersides and have been experimenting with this over the past 5 years.

My daily driving E30 M3 SE was the first victim so I stripped it apart and repainted the black sections with Satin Hammerite and changed all the fixings with new items from the dealer. I then dosed the sections with Waxoyl. It all looked rather pleasing for the first two years or so during which time I would pressure clean before servicing. and then re apply the waxoyl.

In the main this has preserved however not in all areas and so I am now considering having the black sections powder coated and the fixings zinc coated by a local platers as the passivate does not seem to last.

It always feels dissapointing to seeing the underside looking old and tatty and would be nice to keep this looking sharp and tidy.

The diff casing is one item that always looks a mess, but to powder coat is a big job as all the internals will have to be removed.

Same with all the items that are 'bushed' as these have to be pressed out.

There is a fab 3.0CSL for sale in Austria, this has been completely renovated and looks better than new on the underside and creates the vision for these future underside projects. However the CSL is back to original spec and will soon start to deteriorate unless stored in good condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Hello Darren and Richard,

An interesting post. I wonder whether an oil such as Castrol 'Magnatec' would help to retain oil throughout the winter for the start up it has a clingy consistency.
One of the participants of our E34S Alps tour was a classic sports car specialist who mainly worked on Aston Martin, Jaguar, Lamborghini and has such had an tremendous knowledge not only in engineering, but also in maintenance. Unfortunatelly he has passed away this winter, but I will spare you his opinion about Castrol and particular TWS. Unfortunatelly he seems to be on the right side given the many long term running problems that do exist. He used Agip syn2000 for all his clients and personal cars (several E34's and Z3M) and given how accurate he was he had his reasons so I am tempted to give this a try.

I find that by keeping the garage queens in the 'air flow bags' that the surface rust does not develop but my experience with everyday drivers is such that once the yellow pasivate has worn off the fixings nothing will stop the corrosion as shown on Raymonds car.
It isn't that bad on my car as the chassis and body are spotless on these very few spots. In fact, I doubt that my daily driver, a 2001 W203 Mercedes looks better from underneath.

My daily driving E30 M3 SE was the first victim so I stripped it apart and repainted the black sections with Satin Hammerite and changed all the fixings with new items from the dealer. I then dosed the sections with Waxoyl. It all looked rather pleasing for the first two years or so during which time I would pressure clean before servicing. and then re apply the waxoyl.
Untill now, I only posted some attention spots (not problematic) for reference. I will do the same for parts that are OK.

It always feels dissapointing to seeing the underside looking old and tatty and would be nice to keep this looking sharp and tidy.
Yes, in that respect, my E34S looks much better then my E28S. The most disturbing part is the exhaust and indeed the differential. But the exhaust simply is a wear-part so must be replaced from time to time anyhow. It is just disturbing to see that mechanics who have the honor on working on classics like these fail to see the significance of using new nuts and bolts.




I am sorry that your camshafts are displaying this wear pattern. But, you appear to be in good company with many other owners. Lots of pics do tell a story.:applause:
I have other pics from other vehicles that also display similar pitting.
They were intermittant use vehicles also.
I don't care as I can correct this without much difficulty as the S38 cam's can be replaced without removing the head. This unlike the M30 engine that requires the tappets to be removed.

Do you watch & wait or do you change & pre-empt a failure that may never happen !

Camshafts are expensive...but cheap compared to a complete engine rebuild.
The last time that I have checked, S38 cams were 418 Euro's ex VAT each and I am still concidering buying a pair just in case. Inevitably, these parts will be lower in demand and once the current stock has been sold off, prices will rise. As said, I am undecided.
 

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or Florida maybe ?

Cheers
Farrell
Florida is a bad location because of the very high concentration of salts in the atmosphere. I kept a boat in dry dock in FL for years and the amount of surface damage on various types of material -metal, fibreglass, composites, etc- from corrosion is extreme. Not to mention an oil analysis on the engines showed high concentrations of salts. Cars do fare better, but I think there would have to be some consideration as to the atmosphere in which the cars are kept.
 

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I bet Faz would've have killed for a set of rear axle beam bushes on N09 that were as tidy as those pictured on your car Ray !

A credit to you ......although I couldn't bear not to drive her much !
 
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