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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Team,
Just thought I'd create a pictorial DIY for the drive belt, idler pulley, and tensioner pulleys replacement. I searched and searched and freaking searched to find a complete guide to accomplishing this task and only came up with bits and pieces. Hopefully someone else will find this and get some benefit. Everything I wanted to replace came in under $100 shipped (Amazon Prime) and I did this because on cold-starts, it sounded like a belt was squealing and was quite embarrassing. As time passed, it got worse. So here we go.

Parts Needed:
QTY (1) Waterpump/Alternator Belt: PN 11287838226 (Continental 4060563)
QTY (1) AC/Power Steering Belt: PN 11287835483 (Continental 4060427)
QTY (1) Idler Pulley: PN 11287841228 (Gates 38069)
QTY (2) Tensioner Pulley Only: PN (Dayco 89113)

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Tools Needed:
T25 Torx
T30 Torx
16mm Socket
14mm Socket
Long Breaker Bar
Socket Wrench
Pick

*NOTE: A lot of pics are crappy. I used my phone and wasn't trying too hard.

1. Remove the metal radiator cover with your T30 torx:

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2. Remove the plastic radiator cover with your T25 torx:

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3. Vacuum all the crap off of the radiator if possible:

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*If you look down between the radiator and the AC condenser core, you may see there is a ton of leaves and debris. I had a bunch, and before I buttoned everything up, I vacuumed it all out as best as possible. I searched and found that some people take their radiator out to do this, but I was not prepared to change the coolant, so I figured a way around. All you have to do, is pull up the AC condenser core about 3 inches and fish a small vacuum nozzle down there and suck it out.

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4. Time to remove the fan. On the drivers (LH) side of the fan, there is an electrical connector. Pinch the connector on its sides and pull upward to release. Swing the connector and cable out of your way.

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5. The fan has two tabs that pivot forward and back and rest into slots on the radiator mount, one on each side. To remove the fan, you will need to lift up about a half inch, and flip these tabs rearward toward the engine accordingly, to be able to clear the radiator hoses. While lifting the fan out, you need to hold back the cables and hoses that normally rest under the radiator support and on top of the fan. Be careful and be patient. You will eventually maneuver it out.

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Here is a picture of what one of the pivot tabs look like (mine was missing the drivers side, so this is the passenger side):

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Here is what the fan mount looks like that the pivot tab rests in:

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Here are a couple pics that represent the articulation of the pivot tabs:

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6. At this point, you should have plenty access to get to the pulleys and belts. To protect your radiator from dents and bruises, cut out a sheet of cardboard, if available, and stuff it behind radiator. I laid my fan on top of a box, traced the outline, and used a box cutter to cut out the shape.

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7. Remove the pulley dust caps. You will not reuse these unless you bought OEM stuff, which I didn't.

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
8. Before tearing into the next steps, take a moment to analyze how the belts are routed and admire the S85 in all its glory. It would behoove you to make a simple sketch of the belt routing as well. Here, I did it for you:

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9. Begin by removing the idler pulley. Use a 16mm socket wrench and loosen the bolt on the idler pulley. Then, place a 14mm socket on a breaker bar on the tensioner pulley below the idler pulley. Pull the breaker bar towards the drivers side (clockwise) to loosen slack on the belt. While doing this, finish loosening the idler pulley and remove it completely. The belt should now have enough slack to remove.

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Here is a side-by-side shot of the OE and Gates idler pulley:

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Here is my OE belt. Still looked great for its age:

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Here are a couple side-by-side shots of the OE and the Continental belts:

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10. You can now remove the pulley on the belt tensioner. Use a 14mm socket wrench and turn the bolt toward the passenger side of the car (counterclockwise). Remove pulley.

OE:

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OE (left) & Dayco (right):

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11. Go ahead and install the new tensioner pulley and hand tighten.

12. Now we are going to remove the waterpump/alternator belt. Use your 14mm socket on the breaker bar, place on the tensioner pulley bolt and turn toward the drivers side (clockwise). This releases enough tension that you can slip the belt out from around the tensioner. Remove belt.

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13. Remove/Replace tensioner pulley the same way you did the previous one.

Here are some pictures of my OE belt:

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Here is a side-by-side shot of the OE (left) vs Continental (right):

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14. Now we are going to start to put everything back together. Install the waterpump/alternator belt by routing it around the appropriate pulleys and leaving the tensioner pulley last. Use your 14mm breaker bar turning the tensioner clockwise and work the belt on the tensioner pulley. Its going to be a bit difficult as the belt is new and hasn't stretched any.

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15. Now install the AC/power steering belt leaving the tensioner pulley for last. Again, use your 14mm breaker bar turning the tensioner clockwise and slipping the belt on.

16. Now we need to install the new idler pulley. If you look at the back of the pulley and where it mounts on the motor, there is a small nipple and corresponding indention where it fits. Be sure to line this up when installing. You will need to use the 14mm breaker bar on the tensioner and the 16mm socket wrench at the same time to install the idler pulley. Hand tighten.

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17. Check your work and make sure the belt grooves are in their appropriate grooves on each pulley.

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18. Reinstall the fan the opposite of removal. Be sure to plug the electrical connector back in.

19. Reinstall the plastic radiator cover with the T25 torx and hook the hoses back into their spots.

20. Reinstall the metal radiator cover with the T30 torx and hook the cables/wires into their spots.

30. Start your car and check for any mishaps.

31. Stand back and admire a job well done:

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Thx for writing this up and great pics and details! I will reference back to this DIY for sure when I replace belts.
 

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Good move. I just had mine done as part of the rod bearing replacement and internal VANOS pressure line replacement. This rushing sound of worn bearings has disappeared completely. Very satisfying. We also discovered a leaking water pump bearing. Very subtle as it was dripping out of the weep hole. Did you check the pump? Very obscure and something really look for (from the bottom).

 

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Discussion Starter #8
Good move. I just had mine done as part of the rod bearing replacement and internal VANOS pressure line replacement. This rushing sound of worn bearings has disappeared completely. Very satisfying. We also discovered a leaking water pump bearing. Very subtle as it was dripping out of the weep hole. Did you check the pump? Very obscure and something really look for (from the bottom).
No, but thanks for the heads-up. I will bust out the inspection mirror this weekend to see.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Anyone, please feel free to post up proper torque specs for the idler and tensioner pulley bolts. I haven't fired up DIS in a really long time, and every time I do, its a fiasco.
 

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They should not charge more than 3-4 hours. It is fairly simple. Remove bottom cover and fain cowl. Get to work.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The job took me, from 4:01 PM (when the car was on ramps) till 6:51 PM (when I started her up), so roughly 3 hours. I did all work from the top because why the heck would I want to lay on the ground the whole time and deal with taking off like 100 screws for the bottom panel. My time included snapping a bunch of pics, my power going out at the hours for about 30 minutes, and cleaning out all the trash in front of the radiator. So, realistically, I believe I could have done this in 2 hours or less.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just heads up, under parts needed you put Dayco 89113 but the picture shows part #89133.
Good catch! 89133 is correct. Problem is, I can't go back to edit the original post. Thank you for catching this.
 

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thanks, added to master DIY in maintenance section.
 

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I just got done doing this, checked the grooves to make sure everything was correct. Put everything back together and car starts and runs smooth. So I put everything back together and tried to go for a drive, the power steering is very rough and makes squeal sounds when I turn the wheel. Did I do something wrong? The car revs fine with no squeals, just the power steering has the problem. I am waiting for the car to cool down so I can take a look at it again. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
 

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Sounds like either the PS pulley isn't on properly - or it's a POS; or somehow you are low on PS (ATF) fluid.
The steering was fine until I did the change out. I will check the fluid though. Does the new belts have a certain direction that they need to be installed? I just made sure the grooves lined up. Going to start taking it apart again now....
 
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