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I have double glazing on the windows of my 2001 UK spec E39 M5, and they have developed a problem that makes it look like some water or other liquid has penetrated in between the two layers of glass mainly around the edges and corners...

It's hard to describe but anyway it doesn't look very nice, and I was wondering if anyone has had a similar problem and perhaps can suggest a fix that won't cost the earth?
 

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Sounds like the seal has been compromised somewhere around the window. I have seen the same thing when the headlight seal is damaged and condensation after a riain or wash fogs them for a day or so.

I have the same thing in a couple of the windows in my home...they get condensation between the panes...looks like crap, but to remove, re-seal, and reinstall was almost the cost of installing brand new windows. I hope there is a more economical way to repair it for the M5.
 

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Don't think so. As I have "double-glazing" I will follow this thread with great interest.
 

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I really want the double glaze window upgrade!!! but the cost is not cheap :( paging M5boy:D
 

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I have double glazing on the windows of my 2001 UK spec E39 M5, and they have developed a problem that makes it look like some water or other liquid has penetrated in between the two layers of glass mainly around the edges and corners...

It's hard to describe but anyway it doesn't look very nice, and I was wondering if anyone has had a similar problem and perhaps can suggest a fix that won't cost the earth?
I think you have PROTECTIVE GLAZING(s357 option code), not insulating double glazing. Do you know your option codes? My friend's e38 740il have the same problem with protective glazing. Price for one e39's protective rear side window is 1000 euro in Germany. Protects from thiefs.
 

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I have double glazing and I have heard somewhere on this board that if the seal breaks it's a new window. The only way I can think of to fix this is remove the window and replce the seal. The problem is I think they are vacume sealed.
 

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I have double glazing and I have heard somewhere on this board that if the seal breaks it's a new window. The only way I can think of to fix this is remove the window and replce the seal. The problem is I think they are vacume sealed.
Without knowing too much about this problem i would have to agree with the above suggestion. The e38 7er had "comfort glass" or something to that effect and had two panes. People with these windows sometimes developed a leak in the seal and the only course of action was to replace the windows, not cheap by any means...Ill be following this thread...good luck!
 

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Interested in this as I have double glazing also.

To get moisture between the panes there must be a leak in the seal somewhere.

Do you know anyone who works in the glazing industry?

Surely there must be a way to repair? I would imagine something like a syringe to remove the vapour?

You could try removing the window, heat it (somehow and carefully) so that all the moisture evaporates, or you could make a new small hole in the seal, perhaps at the bottom end of the window where it will not be seen, to allow the vapour to escape and then re-seal?

Like I said, there must be a way - surely there are repair kits for household double glazing??

Richie.
 

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I think Richie maybe on the right lines, however you would need to heat the window to evaporate the water vapor, find the break in the seal, suck the all the air out and reseal very quickly.
 

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I wonder if you could heat it up to evaporate the moisture, take it into a super cold walk in freezer until it was cold and reseal? The super cold air would have almost no humidity in it so sucking all the air out wouldn't be necessary?
 

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I have both an M5 with double glazing and with protective glazing. Actually the last one I just recently acquired.

Both cars have same problem, the only difference is that the one with protective glazing did had remedy. Due to security reasons we have several armored cars at home and the security glazing has the same basic principals as the armored glass, it has polycarbonate. The armored glass has same problem as double glazing windows. It de-laminates over time.
What Armoring companies usually do to resolve this problem, is they treat the glass in an autoclave. This helps the polycarbonate set again and the "bubbles" disappear. I had them try that on my double glazing (non polycarbonate laminated glass) and the first window they did came out great. The second one shattered. So now I'm down one window, and decided not to risk the remaining two rear windows.


I read in another forum a person got the glass for as low as 188 USD from a dealer in California.
I'm now wondering if it would be worth while to install Protective glazing instead of the original double glazing on my M.
 

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Hello,

I have not a E39 M5 but 540iA with this option "protective glazing". There is alot of dampness between the layers of glazing in nearly every side window of my car. How is the solution with these protective "glasses"? Any idea of how the liquid could be away from where it should not be? Could it be possible to just heat the glazing to get the dampness away and then reseal? And if its possible to get the liquid away how should the re-sealing be done properly? If it was only the normal douple glazing I would have already bought all side glazing new, but this protective glazing is terribly more expensive, about 1000€ apiece in Germany, thats something I'm not going to pay for one pice of glazing...

Thanks
 

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Hello,

I have not a E39 M5 but 540iA with this option "protective glazing". There is alot of dampness between the layers of glazing in nearly every side window of my car. How is the solution with these protective "glasses"? Any idea of how the liquid could be away from where it should not be? Could it be possible to just heat the glazing to get the dampness away and then reseal? And if its possible to get the liquid away how should the re-sealing be done properly? If it was only the normal douple glazing I would have already bought all side glazing new, but this protective glazing is terribly more expensive, about 1000€ apiece in Germany, thats something I'm not going to pay for one pice of glazing...

Thanks
Not to sound rude but did you read the thread? You will most likely need a new window...
 

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I suppose you could just replace your failed double/protective windows with standard glazing.....You'd need to ID what other items need to be changed (seals? channel? etc...)
 

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Not to sound rude but did you read the thread? You will most likely need a new window...
Yes, no problem, I read the whole topic atleast twice. I was just refering to post written by jesusrdzc. If someone had find a solution how this "remedy" he mentioned could be used to protective glazing i.e. some more information about fixing these glasses.

The two reasons why I would first like try to fix the protective glazing are that first of all I would like to keep the car in original condition and secondly as I compare the quietness of my 540 to my friends e39 with basic glazing the difference is HUGE. My 540 is very quiet.

If there is no way to fix the glasses I may have to think about buying 4 pieces of new doupple glazing(not protective). I think they should fit quite easily.

Thanks m8s
 
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