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Do you always change all brake pads?

  • Yes, always front and back

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • No, only front or back, depending on the wear level

    Votes: 17 89.5%
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello guys,

My "Check brake linings" message appeared today, so I am going to replace the brake pads. I know that the front and rear pads wear out differently, so do you always change all brake pads or only those (front or back) which report that they need a change?

How can one identify which pads reported the level as low?

Thanks.
 

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I voted for just which ever pads need it, that is ONLY if you plan to have the same pads there were in there. So if you have OEM brake pads, get equivalent pads if you just replace the front or rear. If you want a different, more track oriented, pad you should ALWAYS change those all, so that you have even stopping power front and rear. It wouldnt make sense to have OEM pads on the front and race pads on the back, you would have a very odd and possibly detrimental, brake feel.
 

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Hello guys,

My "Check brake linings" message appeared today, so I am going to replace the brake pads. I know that the front and rear pads wear out differently, so do you always change all brake pads or only those (front or back) which report that they need a change?

How can one identify which pads reported the level as low?

Thanks.
Generally change out pads an axle at a time. The way to check which ones is to pull the wheels and look at them. As a rough guide, when the brake pad materials is thinner than the backing plate, you are definitely due!

Fronts should wear faster than rears. Even though fronts are bigger, they handle 70-80% of the braking.

Regards,
Jerry
 

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Can't see why (unless you're upgrading maybe) you'd ever change both front and rear if they didn't both need it simultaneously, which as said above seems unlikely given the different wear rates. Just check them, and change an axle at a time when needed, I reckon.
 

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One axle at a time as needed.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Do you think I can remove the front left and rear right tires, remove the sensor and see which one failed, so that I can order the right pads? I read that the sensor is "broken" when it gives the warning but I am not sure if I can get it out without breaking it myself.
 

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Do you think I can remove the front left and rear right tires, remove the sensor and see which one failed, so that I can order the right pads? I read that the sensor is "broken" when it gives the warning but I am not sure if I can get it out without breaking it myself.
Peek through the window in the caliper to see how worn the pads are. You just have to take the wheel off.
Another option is to measure the resistance of the sensor. The sensor is just a wire embedded in plastic that gets cut as the rotor wears through it, so a broken sensor will measure as an open circuit. No test light/ohmmeter? Just plug in a good sensor and see if the light goes away. No spare sensor? Just snip the sensor wires and tie them together (on the side that plugs into the car, obviously) to fool the car into thinking the circuit is closed again.
 

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I put both axles, but that's just the way I am, I suppose if the rears showed very little wear, I could be persuaded.
 
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