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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those who don't know, I am a satisfied Dinan customer. One of the qualities that drew me into deciding to choose Dinan products was their attention to detail in developing, refining and advertising with accurate (conservatively so) statistics. Unfortunately, while horsepower, torque and engineering data are plentiful, Dinan does not often advertise performance in mathematical terms :sad1:

Here are some statistics that I, and I'm sure many other E39 M5 owners, would find useful:

1) Skidpad numbers all taken on the same day, with the same car and driver, with the following tire pressures: 34/38, 30/32, 34/34, 36/40 and 40/40.

2) What is the acceleration of a stock M5 compared to one modified only with the Dinan diff? 0-60, 0-100 and 1/4 mile would be nice. What about an S2 without the diff?

3) Has the theoretical top speed of 191 (or 209 with stock diff) be reached by an S2? or S3? If so, how long does it take each to accelerate to said speeds?

4) How about slalom speeds using both Motortrend and Car and Driver's slalom layouts? I've always been curious to compare my S2's handling to newer machines.

5) 100-0, 70-0 and 60-0 with the offered Brembo brake package.

6) Slalom and skidpad stats for both Koni and JRZ suspension kits.

Most people simply do not believe how good a car Dinan makes from the M5 and it's not always possible to take one of the uninitiated for a ride. It would be quite handy for owners to be able to point to documented proof of the S2 and S3's abilities - not to mention it would wet our appetites for further upgrades!
 

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Just in case you have only been on this board since Mar 2005 and not visiting as a guest for the last year or two, you might not be aware that there is a strong love/hate relationship with Dinan by the members of this board. Don't know the exact figures, but it seems like a 50-50 split. Folks either hate Dinan or love Dinan. If you are not aware of the strong anti-Dinan contingent of members than I recommend you do a search and read past threads.

I am in the camp that thinks that the Dinan products, for the most part (not including his brakes or ssk), are well developed and provide good quality over time. They are not cheap, but sometimes the cheaper stuff doesn't hold up. I get the feeling that if Dinan would cut his prices in half (or give his stuff away) then a good many of the Dinan-haters would quickly change their tune. I have not yet modded my M5, but if I do then the Dinan products will be on my list (along with brakes and SSK from Dave Z). (Another option is of course to trade-up to a E60 M5 or E63 M6).

I also get the feeling that many of the folks such as myself who are not anti-Dinan stay out of many of the Dinan-bashing threads. IMO it isn't worth the time or energy to get involved as it is usually a one-way expression of hate, rather than a discussion or conversation.
 

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the S2 has been tested pretty well by the various magazines, bimmer, car and driver etc, back when it was new. The s3 reviews are hitting the news stands now, unfortunately no hard numbers in the roundel or european car issues. I do remember both the s2 and s3 will hit a rev limited 191 with 345 gears. I think bimmer had the s2 do a 0-60 in 4.1s, iirc.
Mike
 

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Car and Driver did a great review on the S2. They are probably the most trustworthy and accurate with their testing. They found the S2 to get to 60 in 4.1 and to 100 in 10 seconds. Their testimony was a contributing factor to my decision to go with the Dinan engine mods which I have no regrets. I am still on the fence about a clutch/flywheel package and until my current starts to go, I will watch what comes along.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
phinnbillM5 said:
Just in case you have only been on this board since Mar 2005 and not visiting as a guest for the last year or two, you might not be aware that there is a strong love/hate relationship with Dinan by the members of this board. Don't know the exact figures, but it seems like a 50-50 split. Folks either hate Dinan or love Dinan. If you are not aware of the strong anti-Dinan contingent of members than I recommend you do a search and read past threads.

I am in the camp that thinks that the Dinan products, for the most part (not including his brakes or ssk), are well developed and provide good quality over time. They are not cheap, but sometimes the cheaper stuff doesn't hold up. I get the feeling that if Dinan would cut his prices in half (or give his stuff away) then a good many of the Dinan-haters would quickly change their tune. I have not yet modded my M5, but if I do then the Dinan products will be on my list (along with brakes and SSK from Dave Z). (Another option is of course to trade-up to a E60 M5 or E63 M6).

I also get the feeling that many of the folks such as myself who are not anti-Dinan stay out of many of the Dinan-bashing threads. IMO it isn't worth the time or energy to get involved as it is usually a one-way expression of hate, rather than a discussion or conversation.
Yes, I got the impression that some do not like Dinan. That's fine, everyone's entitled to their opinion. I think Dinan's parts are a bit overpriced, but still worth it if you can afford them because of their dependability. More important than anything though is who installs the parts!

mikeoski said:
Car and Driver did a great review on the S2. They are probably the most trustworthy and accurate with their testing. They found the S2 to get to 60 in 4.1 and to 100 in 10 seconds. Their testimony was a contributing factor to my decision to go with the Dinan engine mods which I have no regrets. I am still on the fence about a clutch/flywheel package and until my current starts to go, I will watch what comes along.
Yes, that article influenced my decision to go with Dinan products as well. But that's only two numbers, useful as they are, that have nothing to do with handling or braking. Anyone with some spare time and a GTech Pro could generate some useful data - I'm sure Dinan could provide very accurate numbers if they wished.
 

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palantirion said:
Most people simply do not believe how good a car Dinan makes from the M5 and it's not always possible to take one of the uninitiated for a ride. It would be quite handy for owners to be able to point to documented proof of the S2 and S3's abilities - not to mention it would wet our appetites for further upgrades!
I agree, it really is night and day difference. I was so happy and satisfied with my stock M5 until I drove an S2 and then I could not live without it :wroom: . The S3 is nice, but when I drove it, it didn't feel that different from the S2, except it was a little less responsive, and you could really feel it pull harder from 85mph and up. I would have loved to have had my S2 there though to do a head to head. I'm pretty sure it would beat it up to 75mph.

But to get back on topic, you have an S2, why not try to measure some of these things yourself? I will probably try some, because I will interested in comparing it with my new E60. Then maybe we can find one of the 8 owners of S3's and convince them to do the same (although I don't see that happening).

I can tell you my best (still weak) 1/4 times at LACR were 12.9 with BFG drag radials. Being inexperienced, after 20 passes I had to replace the diff, so I haven't been back out to the track since then. And with my gTimer I've only been able to achieve 4.7 0-60 times - with every type of launch imaginable. So I have no idea how anyone got 4.1, especially on street tires (I've heard C&D uses a formula to compute 0-60 times rather than actually do it with the car - which is kind of lame IMHO). FWIW, on the track my gTimer was pretty close to the track times - to give some validity to the 0-60 times. I know some people have issues with gTimer stats :) .


Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
paule said:
I agree, it really is night and day difference. I was so happy and satisfied with my stock M5 until I drove an S2 and then I could not live without it :wroom: . The S3 is nice, but when I drove it, it didn't feel that different from the S2, except it was a little less responsive, and you could really feel it pull harder from 85mph and up. I would have loved to have had my S2 there though to do a head to head. I'm pretty sure it would beat it up to 75mph.

But to get back on topic, you have an S2, why not try to measure some of these things yourself? I will probably try some, because I will interested in comparing it with my new E60. Then maybe we can find one of the 8 owners of S3's and convince them to do the same (although I don't see that happening).

I can tell you my best (still weak) 1/4 times at LACR were 12.9 with BFG drag radials. Being inexperienced, after 20 passes I had to replace the diff, so I haven't been back out to the track since then. And with my gTimer I've only been able to achieve 4.7 0-60 times - with every type of launch imaginable. So I have no idea how anyone got 4.1, especially on street tires (I've heard C&D uses a formula to compute 0-60 times rather than actually do it with the car - which is kind of lame IMHO). FWIW, on the track my gTimer was pretty close to the track times - to give some validity to the 0-60 times. I know some people have issues with gTimer stats :) .


Paul
The reasons I haven't done these things myself:

1) I'm not a good enough driver. My shifting technique is poor and I know that my results would not be reflective of the car's true ability.

2) I don't have the test equipment. Gtech is nice, but not in the same ballpark as the equiment used by racetracks and most automotive magazines.

3) I don't have the venues. I'm not going to try and hit 191mph on the I5 through LA.

4) My car isn't exactly a Dinan S2. I'm still running stock wheels, with 265 and 285 tires, and I have 15mm front wheel spacers. I'm also not using their Brembo package, I opted for a Stop Tech front wheel kit.

So, Even if 1-3 were satisfied, 4 would negate the test results for most of the stats I mentioned. From what I've read on Dinan's website, they are meticulous at testing and would be the best candidates to do so. Besides, it's advertising for their products - c'mon guys, test!
 

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palantirion said:
So, Even if 1-3 were satisfied, 4 would negate the test results for most of the stats I mentioned. From what I've read on Dinan's website, they are meticulous at testing and would be the best candidates to do so. Besides, it's advertising for their products - c'mon guys, test!
Yeah, I see, it would be nice if they did. I think the problem would be that it would become like the AMD/Intel scenario. Whichever company's marketing team wants to have bragging rights will figure out a way to massage/manipulate test data to skew results to their benefit. I think Dinan has integrity, so they wouldn't play like that, but they open themselves up to all the wannabes one upping their stats for marketing purposes. Already they take a hit on the horsepower stats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
paule said:
Yeah, I see, it would be nice if they did. I think the problem would be that it would become like the AMD/Intel scenario. Whichever company's marketing team wants to have bragging rights will figure out a way to massage/manipulate test data to skew results to their benefit. I think Dinan has integrity, so they wouldn't play like that, but they open themselves up to all the wannabes one upping their stats for marketing purposes. Already they take a hit on the horsepower stats.
That's a very good point Paule, and one I have thought about.

Why buy a BMW 330? The G35 is better statistically in many ways and less expensive. Why buy a Ferrari 360 instead of a Corvette? Because there are intangibles that mean more to a decerning owner than numbers on the page of a magazine: steering feel, build quality, the sound of the door closing, the feel of the seat, location of switches, etc.

I would expect the statistics to be beaten by other, more marketing-oriented companies. Dinan is painfully honest with their claims. But we know that, and it is one of those intangibles. Dinan parts cost more than many competitors', but they still have great sales. Dinan doesn't market with nearly as much intensity as UUC, listing every detail of why they think their products are better, but I think that's partly because Dinan expects customers to already understand the quality of their products; the speak sofly and carry a big stick approach.

Sure, printing statistics gives the competition a big bullseye to aim for, but that doesn't stop BMW from letting magazines test drive their cars. Sometimes they get beaten, sometimes they don't, but BMW owners know that there's more to their cars' superiority than numbers. The numbers just give owners a frame of reference with which to compare the objective qualities of their cars with others'. And that's darn interesting and useful.
 

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With respect to BMW "kits", Dinan is the choice for folks who are unwilling or technically unable to investigate alternatives. This is a twist on the no-brainer theme. Some of the stuff they sell is uniue and good, but their offerings are generally way overpriced and no better that stuff you can buy elsewhere. In addition, mfrs that specialize in a particular product often offer better stuff.

The Dinan E39 suspension stuff is not impressive at all. In my opinion, Ground Control & Bilstein have outdone them with coil-overs and superior ancillary hardware (adjustable strut mounts). The same goes for niche mfrs for various products including differentials, headers, shifters, superchargers, clutches and brakes.

Under close examination, you will discover that:

1) Dinan headers are welded together from a bag full of short tubing sections, looking like a prototype header or a quilt at the county fair.
2) Alternative differentials are available with several different locking designs for specific needs.
3) Some Dinan shifters are OEM BMW with inflated prices and D's painted on them.
4) Dinan does not offer an oversize clutch.
5) Brake kits are sold by many vendors in countless configurations with more attractive pricing.
6) Dinan suspensions are generally a one-size-fits-all compromise. The various stages offered are not really for different duty or use, they simply alter the parts count to affect pricing. Various spring rates are not offered or even specified & this is pathetic. A real enthusiast needs this info.

Dinan is too focused on "value added resale" for my liking, but admittedly, this is what some non-technical folks want & need. Many folks just want to write a check for a turnkey solution. The Dinan label has almost become some sort of market-accepted approval or certification for aftermarket products. When they apply a "D" moniker to a common piece of hardware and double it's retail cost, it makes me sick. This is the case with many of their products.
 

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palantirion said:
2) I don't have the test equipment. Gtech is nice, but not in the same ballpark as the equiment used by racetracks and most automotive magazines.
C&D did a test on the GTech and GTimer type devices a few issues back. In summary they are very accurate tools. What is inaccurate in many cases is the user. For example, these units come with a rollout setting of 12" as the default value. To get true acceleration times from 0 mph, the user must set them to 0" of rollout (easy to do, just need to understand why and do it).

Track timers do not measure real 1/4 mile acceleration times. The time you will get at the end of the 1/4 mile depends as much as 0.3 to 0.5 seconds on how you stage the car (and how hard the car can launch). This is all due to rollout...the time it takes (and distance your car travels) for the tire to unblock the staged light. Most pro racers stage very close to the point where the light is unblocked since they aren't concerned about their time -- just getting to the end of the strip first and being extremely consistent.

I did 9 runs down the strip with my GTimer GT2, and when I staged by just barely ticking on the staged light and had the GTimer set to 12" of rollout, I got times that were within 0.04 seconds of the strip timer. My trap speeds were less than 2mph different. Also realize that the trap speed at the strip is an average speed over the final 66' of the strip as opposed to an instantaneous time. Hence a strip derived time to speed measurement (i.e. 13.3 @ 109 mph) can and will be different than a true measured time from 0mph up to 109mph.

The net of it is that these devices are very accurate when used in a proper manner.

Cheers,
Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
CSBM5 said:
C&D did a test on the GTech and GTimer type devices a few issues back. In summary they are very accurate tools. What is inaccurate in many cases is the user. For example, these units come with a rollout setting of 12" as the default value. To get true acceleration times from 0 mph, the user must set them to 0" of rollout (easy to do, just need to understand why and do it).

Track timers do not measure real 1/4 mile acceleration times. The time you will get at the end of the 1/4 mile depends as much as 0.3 to 0.5 seconds on how you stage the car (and how hard the car can launch). This is all due to rollout...the time it takes (and distance your car travels) for the tire to unblock the staged light. Most pro racers stage very close to the point where the light is unblocked since they aren't concerned about their time -- just getting to the end of the strip first and being extremely consistent.

I did 9 runs down the strip with my GTimer GT2, and when I staged by just barely ticking on the staged light and had the GTimer set to 12" of rollout, I got times that were within 0.04 seconds of the strip timer. My trap speeds were less than 2mph different. Also realize that the trap speed at the strip is an average speed over the final 66' of the strip as opposed to an instantaneous time. Hence a strip derived time to speed measurement (i.e. 13.3 @ 109 mph) can and will be different than a true measured time from 0mph up to 109mph.

The net of it is that these devices are very accurate when used in a proper manner.

Cheers,
Chuck
Very interesing Chuck.
1) What mods does your M5 have?
2) How well does Gtech measure lateral Gs and braking distance?
3) Why has no rep from Dinan chimed iin yet?

p.s. how does the V70R compare to the 850 wagon? My sister had a '97 850 and I loved driving it.
 

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palantirion said:
Very interesing Chuck.
1) What mods does your M5 have?
2) How well does Gtech measure lateral Gs and braking distance?
3) Why has no rep from Dinan chimed iin yet?

p.s. how does the V70R compare to the 850 wagon? My sister had a '97 850 and I loved driving it.
1) M5 mods...not many: Ground Control adjustable camber plates, Dinan rear bar, 9.5" rims/275/35's up front.

2) I don't know, but I would believe that their strength lies mostly in measuring acceleration from a stop. As long as the unit is properly setup for the roll rate of the chassis, it should accurately measure lateral G's. Realize here that it is actually rare to find perfectly flat pavement, so any comparison to measured cornering forces MUST be done over the same section of pavement. If you were to say measure (record) lateral G's through the same turn at a track to compare mods to the car or car's setup, even that is prone to user error (i.e. slightly different line through the corner is one example), so you would need to average many runs with each setup imo.

3) Dinan rarely interacts on this board from my experience.

The V70R is better in almost every respect than the 850R (as it should be). Since its a 6-speed manual, the V70R is pretty darn quick (i.e. 0-60 times ~5.7 seconds), and it handles very nicely on the track where it can really put down the 300hp (i.e. AWD) coming out of corners. However, the car is not without some major flukes: rear suspension bump steer issues, HORRIBLE turning radius, poor high beam lights, and a continuing desire to visit the dealer's shop for attention. :grrrr:
 

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Lscman said:
With respect to BMW "kits", Dinan is the choice for folks who are unwilling or technically unable to investigate alternatives. This is a twist on the no-brainer theme. Some of the stuff they sell is uniue and good, but their offerings are generally way overpriced and no better that stuff you can buy elsewhere. In addition, mfrs that specialize in a particular product often offer better stuff.

The Dinan E39 suspension stuff is not impressive at all. In my opinion, Ground Control & Bilstein have outdone them with coil-overs and superior ancillary hardware (adjustable strut mounts). The same goes for niche mfrs for various products including differentials, headers, shifters, superchargers, clutches and brakes.

Under close examination, you will discover that:
I had dinan stage 3 on my 1992 525 cornered great, ride was still nice.
Sure they are expensive but who wants to worry about bottoming out or tire wear. I put jcw susp on my wifes 04 jcw mini, i wish i would have bought dinan for that now. We also have 81 930 (450hp) 1120kg. It has all aft market susp great at track not so nice on bumpy street. I wish dinan has a kit for that...after reading many posts i am going with dinan stage 3 with upgraded shocks, i am confident i will be happy. Who has 19" wheels?
dinan talks about weight reduction how much does a factory wheel weigh.
Do you feel a acceleration difference with bbs etc wheels?????

1) Dinan headers are welded together from a bag full of short tubing sections, looking like a prototype header or a quilt at the county fair.
2) Alternative differentials are available with several different locking designs for specific needs.
3) Some Dinan shifters are OEM BMW with inflated prices and D's painted on them.
4) Dinan does not offer an oversize clutch.
5) Brake kits are sold by many vendors in countless configurations with more attractive pricing.
6) Dinan suspensions are generally a one-size-fits-all compromise. The various stages offered are not really for different duty or use, they simply alter the parts count to affect pricing. Various spring rates are not offered or even specified & this is pathetic. A real enthusiast needs this info.

Dinan is too focused on "value added resale" for my liking, but admittedly, this is what some non-technical folks want & need. Many folks just want to write a check for a turnkey solution. The Dinan label has almost become some sort of market-accepted approval or certification for aftermarket products. When they apply a "D" moniker to a common piece of hardware and double it's retail cost, it makes me sick. This is the case with many of their products.
 

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Lscman said:
With respect to BMW "kits", Dinan is the choice for folks who are unwilling or technically unable to investigate alternatives. This is a twist on the no-brainer theme. Some of the stuff they sell is uniue and good, but their offerings are generally way overpriced and no better that stuff you can buy elsewhere. In addition, mfrs that specialize in a particular product often offer better stuff.

The Dinan E39 suspension stuff is not impressive at all. In my opinion, Ground Control & Bilstein have outdone them with coil-overs and superior ancillary hardware (adjustable strut mounts). The same goes for niche mfrs for various products including differentials, headers, shifters, superchargers, clutches and brakes.

Under close examination, you will discover that:

1) Dinan headers are welded together from a bag full of short tubing sections, looking like a prototype header or a quilt at the county fair.
2) Alternative differentials are available with several different locking designs for specific needs.
3) Some Dinan shifters are OEM BMW with inflated prices and D's painted on them.
4) Dinan does not offer an oversize clutch.
5) Brake kits are sold by many vendors in countless configurations with more attractive pricing.
6) Dinan suspensions are generally a one-size-fits-all compromise. The various stages offered are not really for different duty or use, they simply alter the parts count to affect pricing. Various spring rates are not offered or even specified & this is pathetic. A real enthusiast needs this info.

Dinan is too focused on "value added resale" for my liking, but admittedly, this is what some non-technical folks want & need. Many folks just want to write a check for a turnkey solution. The Dinan label has almost become some sort of market-accepted approval or certification for aftermarket products. When they apply a "D" moniker to a common piece of hardware and double it's retail cost, it makes me sick. This is the case with many of their products.
Yes, Dinan's headers are made from tubing sections pulled from a bag. I have seen them do this--the techs take turns doing this blind folded once the shipment from ACME plumbing arrives.

For those that have not been to Dinan's Morgan Hill facility where these headers are made, it is most impressive. The headers are welded together on custom jigs with tubing that increases in diameter from the head to collector, then coated. The fit on the car is perfect. The increasing diameter preserves low end torque and maintains some back pressure which I understand this motor needs. Check out the headers on the F1 Ferrari--headers are welded sections too.

Stock suspensions are one-size-fits-all compromises too--what's your point? Dinan's suspension is only one alternative of many, but one than has modestly improved the performance of the car for excellent street performance. Want to run with the Porsches on the track--the sky's the limit on suspension set-ups.

You insult those that have the Dinan gear. A ton of thought went into this before I made the purchase (right Ottati?). The synergy of all parts is seamless, perfect fitment, outstanding performance and sonics, and a warranty no one can touch. Resale is an issue--buyers are suspicious of modded cars--Dinan cars are less risky in my opinon vs. cars with parts from multiple vendors and installed by techs with unknown reputations and abilities (who can be superb, of course--but may not be a benefit to a buyer from another state).

For the most part, I could care less what people think of Dinan. For me it was the right choice, and a choice I would make again.
 

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Lscman said:
Under close examination, you will discover that:
1) Dinan headers are welded together from a bag full of short tubing sections, looking like a prototype header or a quilt at the county fair.
And my supersprint headers aren't even welded together! Just a bunch of pipes with slip fit connections! RD sport headers are welded and very nice looking, but last i heard on the board they do not actually fit on a car without making dents and bends to clear steering components. I'm being a bit tongue in cheek here, i like my headers (unless of course i can't past smog next year!) but if the price was the same, i'd have gone dinan, which do make more low end power, where i actually lost a little low end. (lucky i have those 345 gears, but that's another thread!)

Lscman said:
6) Dinan suspensions are generally a one-size-fits-all compromise. The various stages offered are not really for different duty or use, they simply alter the parts count to affect pricing. Various spring rates are not offered or even specified & this is pathetic. A real enthusiast needs this info.
I'd consider myself a real enthusiast, and really can care less what my spring rates are. I suppose if i were a real enthusiast i'd be driving an e30 M3 or a lotus elise or something, i mean we're talking about a 4k lbs car here, why try to make a race car out of it!
I'm happy with the street ride, and they perform well on the track. Spring rates make for good discusion i suppose, but open a big can of worms for someone who does not want to spend time and money thru a trial and error process to determine what the best rate is for him. I drove a car with a gc suspension. At the time, the e39 M5 kit was a one size fits all 350/315 combo. For me, the car was too bouncy, and the feel not to my liking. Not really knowing suspension design and engineering, and not being able to get an answer from GC for what would suite my needs, i went with the known vendor, from my experience, and couldn't be happier.
I think their 'stages' does make some sense. I mean adding sway bars will have an effect on handling. So do camber plates. So each stage brings you a higher level of handling potential.

I don't take the dinan bashing personal, i don't think it's meant that way, but we vote with our wallets and in the end get what we want, and end up happy with whatever we do hopefully. I've taken too many cars and modded them to the point where i didn't like them anymore, so this time i wanted to make sure i didn't go over the edge!
Mike
 

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Uh...well on headers they are made just like you would see on a Winston Cup car, welded up with tubing and mandrel bends. check out www.burnsstainless.com and you can order all the sections and weld up a set for yourself.

The shop that takes care of my race car does fabrication and they told me to hand weld a set of headers like that would take a fabricator about a 9-10 days of time. They charge about $5,000 in labor at $60/hr to make something like that for their customers that have Vintage Winston Cup cars. The price Dinan charges sounds outrageous, but not really out of line if they are building from individual parts....I don't understand why they have not cost reduced the headers.

As regards to the suspension, well yeah, I'd agree with you that the hardware itself is not something for a total track junky or hardcore auto-xer, but I think it's better than stock and is about as aggressive as most people want to go. Coilovers are nice, but IMO, not good for somebody that's not hardcore as the threads get dirty making adjustment difficult, and they require a good alignment shop to deal with corner weighting. I love coil overs on my race car, but for the street I'd rather just never want to mess with it.

Shifters, well its well known you can use alternate parts from the parts bin for different throws.

3.45 Diff for $2995, is a big joke. Get a 3.45 from a 1978-1980 733i. Can find those in bone yards for less than $300. The gears will swap into the M5 case. Probably a $600 mod parts and bench labor (not including R&R). My race shop built one for ernie on this board.

Well at the end of the day the aftermarket is a Business....gotta pay bills..and you've found a good niche like Dinan all the more power too them.







Lscman said:
The Dinan E39 suspension stuff is not impressive at all. In my opinion, Ground Control & Bilstein have outdone them with coil-overs and superior ancillary hardware (adjustable strut mounts). The same goes for niche mfrs for various products including differentials, headers, shifters, superchargers, clutches and brakes.

Under close examination, you will discover that:

1) Dinan headers are welded together from a bag full of short tubing sections, looking like a prototype header or a quilt at the county fair.
2) Alternative differentials are available with several different locking designs for specific needs.
3) Some Dinan shifters are OEM BMW with inflated prices and D's painted on them.
4) Dinan does not offer an oversize clutch.
5) Brake kits are sold by many vendors in countless configurations with more attractive pricing.
6) Dinan suspensions are generally a one-size-fits-all compromise. The various stages offered are not really for different duty or use, they simply alter the parts count to affect pricing. Various spring rates are not offered or even specified & this is pathetic. A real enthusiast needs this info.

Dinan is too focused on "value added resale" for my liking, but admittedly, this is what some non-technical folks want & need. Many folks just want to write a check for a turnkey solution. The Dinan label has almost become some sort of market-accepted approval or certification for aftermarket products. When they apply a "D" moniker to a common piece of hardware and double it's retail cost, it makes me sick. This is the case with many of their products.
 
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