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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Looking to buy a pair of Dinan camber plates for my 1999 540i, I figure the M5 guys are most likely to have done this mod so I ask here :byee55amg.
My car has the factory Sports M-tech suspension + Bilstein HD struts all around + staggered style 32 rims + Eibach front and rear sways + a Dinan strut bar (not that that necessarily makes any difference).

Anyways, questions for those who have added them on their own =

1) did you actually feel a noticeable difference in how the car handled after you installed them?
2) if yes, what were the most noticeable improvements?
3) did you notice any difference in how the front tires wore out afterwards?
4) in your opinion is it a worthy 'bang for buck' mod, when you consider the $350 price tag for the camber plates + installation cost?

Any and all experiences and/or comments are welcome - thanks!
 

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Don't forget to add in the cost of an alignment.

I don't have Dinan camber plates, but I do have Ground Control camber plates on the front only. I got the camber plates to aid in track events but still use the car as my daily also, therefore the ability to adjust back and forth is important

1) With the proper alignment post install, I noticed no appreciable difference for highway or city driving but . . .
2) A significant improvement in turning grip when approaching 8 or 9/10ths.
3) At full negative camber, the inside of the tires definitely started to wear out with daily highway use. I adjusted it back about halfway (approx. 1 degree of added negative camber over stock) which alleviated the accelerated wear somewhat, but it is my understanding that each adjustment to the camber has an impact on the toe-in and therefore tire wear. So reducing the negative camber which alleviates inner shoulder wear, increases the toe-in which may increase tire wear. (Please note I am not an expert in this area. I'm just providing my feedback as requested.)
4) I think it is a decent bang for the buck mod if you plan on tracking the car. It does not have much value for street purposes unless you are driving 9/10ths in the 'hood - which I do not recommend (even if it is fun sometimes...)
 

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Don't forget to add in the cost of an alignment.

I don't have Dinan camber plates, but I do have Ground Control camber plates on the front only. I got the camber plates to aid in track events but still use the car as my daily also, therefore the ability to adjust back and forth is important

1) With the proper alignment post install, I noticed no appreciable difference for highway or city driving but . . .
2) A significant improvement in turning grip when approaching 8 or 9/10ths.
3) At full negative camber, the inside of the tires definitely started to wear out with daily highway use. I adjusted it back about halfway (approx. 1 degree of added negative camber over stock) which alleviated the accelerated wear somewhat, but it is my understanding that each adjustment to the camber has an impact on the toe-in and therefore tire wear. So reducing the negative camber which alleviates inner shoulder wear, increases the toe-in which may increase tire wear. (Please note I am not an expert in this area. I'm just providing my feedback as requested.)
4) I think it is a decent bang for the buck mod if you plan on tracking the car. It does not have much value for street purposes unless you are driving 9/10ths in the 'hood - which I do not recommend (even if it is fun sometimes...)
Please indicate your wheel setup... to put your comments in perspective...
i.e.: Stock wheels, staggered; stock wheels, square setup; after market 18", 19", 20" staggered or square... spacers or now and if so how thick??
 

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Camber plates allow you to adjust beyond the tiny slots allotted by BMW. Unless you're tracking your car or trying to correct a severe problem they are a waste of money.
 

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Please indicate your wheel setup... to put your comments in perspective...
i.e.: Stock wheels, staggered; stock wheels, square setup; after market 18", 19", 20" staggered or square... spacers or now and if so how thick??
I'm running stock, staggered style 65s with 10 mm spacers all around on the original stock suspension.
 

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Don't forget to add in the cost of an alignment.

3) but it is my understanding that each adjustment to the camber has an impact on the toe-in and therefore tire wear. So reducing the negative camber which alleviates inner shoulder wear, increases the toe-in which may increase tire wear. (Please note I am not an expert in this area. I'm just providing my feedback as requested.)
The "problem" on the E39 M5 (and 540i) is that the tie rods connect behind the centerline of front axle; therefore, when you move the struts in to get more negative camber, the toe goes more in also -- the opposite of what you'd like to have happen. I've just left my GC plates on full negative (~-2.3) and set the toe to almost zero. Tire wear is not too bad at all. So if you set the toe where you want it for the street (i.e. something like 0.05 degrees on both sides), when you then move the camber full negative, the toe in goes up, i.e. more toe in, sadly.

On the E46, E90, etc, with the rack in front and tie rods connecting in front, toe goes out as camber goes in (more negative). On my daughter's E46 with GC coilovers, she set it up with -1.5 camber and toe in middle of factory range for street driving, and then for track/autox it goes in to just over -3 degrees camber, and the toe goes outward to just a very slight toe-out setting. The street to track settings work perfectly on that car.

Camber plates allow you to adjust beyond the tiny slots allotted by BMW. Unless you're tracking your car or trying to correct a severe problem they are a waste of money.
Don't forget that the E39 has no factory slots in the strut towers (unlike the E46 and E90), so camber is totally anchored at a very small number (usually near -0.5).


myknow,

If you're not driving the car very aggressively and wearing the outer edges excessively, just setting the alignment properly on the stock suspension should be fine. If you install the camber plates, there will be a slight increase in front ride height (they increase the stack height), so if it was me, I'd only install them with either Dinan or some other lower/stiffer springs.

Regards,
Chuck
 
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The "problem" on the E39 M5 (and 540i) is that the tie rods connect behind the centerline of front axle; therefore, when you move the struts in to get more negative camber, the toe goes more in also -- the opposite of what you'd like to have happen. I've just left my GC plates on full negative (~-2.3) and set the toe to almost zero. Tire wear is not too bad at all. So if you set the toe where you want it for the street (i.e. something like 0.05 degrees on both sides), when you then move the camber full negative, the toe in goes up, i.e. more toe in, sadly."


This is the opposite of what I had thought. So, Thank you for clarifying. :M5thumbs:
 

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I have the GC plates, i don't know what is the static camber for the dinans, but at ~1.5", the turn in response is incredible. You don't even need to be going that fast to notice the difference. The steering becomes very crisp, provided you have proper tractioned tires up front. The downside is accelerated inner shoulder wear. Is it worthy it? Depends what you're after...
 
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