BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What is the best stuff to detail the motor? I have a white car and once the Dinan intakes were added it left a whole lot of white space open. Plus, after a hot day and a hot few laps at Infineon, my power steering fluid seems to have spilled about the motor. Don't want the greasy, shiny look of an Amorall type product--is there anything you can recommend for good cleaning?

Or how about a good engine detailer in the Bay Area?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
alpineblue said:
What is the best stuff to detail the motor? I have a white car and once the Dinan intakes were added it left a whole lot of white space open. Plus, after a hot day and a hot few laps at Infineon, my power steering fluid seems to have spilled about the motor. Don't want the greasy, shiny look of an Amorall type product--is there anything you can recommend for good cleaning?
Replacing the p/s fluid with Redline ATF will help keep it from weeping out at the track. I still get a little leakage, but it's better than it was. I use rags dampened with a mild degreaser (e.g., Citra-Solv or Simple Green, diluted with some water) to keep the motor clean. I'll wipe it down maybe about once a month. Less often, I'll wipe down the larger plastic pieces with Zaino tire gloss. I have it on my cleaning shelf anyway; it's a good product and it doesn't leave a super-shinny finish or any residue.

Zaino:
http://www.zainostore.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=Z-16&Category_Code=Zaino
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
977 Posts
Simple Green or a citrus degrease is probably going to be what you need to get the P/S residue off, otherwise, a damp rag is good enough for most surfaces. If it's been years and lots of miles without every having the under hood area upkept then it may be worth having it steam cleamed, it will save you a lot of elbow grease. Then from that point, just wipe it down once a month or so with a rag.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
10,456 Posts
Hey Mark, we need to meet up and i can go over my routine. I use this castrol degresser (it's purple) off the auto parts shelf for the oils parts, and a gentle misting with the hose every now and then.
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,398 Posts
Bummer-

I could recommend a great wheel detailer as well as a trunk detailer in the bay area, but no engine detailer.

(Sorry, couldn't resist....)

:)

Adam

PS Ditto on the castrol- it is ASTONISHING stuff for engine parts. BUT AFAIK, it is off the market in California! Mike, have you found some recently? I use that and just soap and water. No shiny treatments, just good clean parts.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
10,456 Posts
ard said:
BUT AFAIK, it is off the market in California! Mike, have you found some recently? I use that and just soap and water. No shiny treatments, just good clean parts.
Really, i bought it a while a go and dilute the heck out if it, so it's lasted a long time. I use it all over the house...
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,398 Posts
mottati said:
I use it all over the house...
Mike
Eh, might have been a rumor- I still have a gallon I use to fill up the 32oz spray...



So nobody growing extra toes there?

:)

A

PS I first tried it when I was doing valve timing chains and oil pump on a Q45 V8 with 170k miles. DIno oil. All parts (valve covers, engine covers, etc etc) were soaked in it for 30 minutes and scrubbed with a nylon bristle brush- and came out looking like they when through a solvent wash take. Just amazing- baked on varnish, old oil, crud- I am usually pretty reserved, but this stuff jumped up to hero status for me. Any time you can avoid solvents, it is a feat. Oh, at full strength the stuff WILL do skin damage. Gloves are essential for major handling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
thanks all. surprisingly, i just picked up my car from east bay bmw after having the oil changed and having the car detailed. i opened the hood to show a salesperson, what do you know, the engine bay had been cleaned too!

i bought the car care program they offer when you buy the car, which warranties for 5 years paint fade and interior fade. i keep my car spotless anyway, but have them treat the interior and wash and wax the car every 6 months--cost is $100. anyway, surprised they did the motor, because i asked if they would, but they said it wasn't part of the service. east bay treats me great!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Hey Mark,

For the future, 303 Aerospace Protectant works great all around - rubber, vinyl, plastic, tires, etc. Gives it a very natural look - not a greasy shine. It is not always easy to find, but I have found it at boat/marine shops.

BTW, I took another great drive to Santa Barbara this past weekend and had Hwy 154 San Marcos Pass all to myself Sunday morning. What a great road when empty. We'll have to get the M5 group together again for a Bimmerfest reunion...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,069 Posts
HDClown said:
If it's been years and lots of miles without every having the under hood area upkept then it may be worth having it steam cleamed, it will save you a lot of elbow grease.
Well getting her steam 'cleamed' or steam cleaned may save you a lot of elbow grease, but the possibility of damaging under hood electrical components will make up for any labor saved.

Personally I would not do this, while electronics are more reliable than before and those under the hood have a lot of resistance to water intrusion, that isn't the case when you apply steam.

IMO you only risk damaging any one of the numerous circuits that regulate operational parameters of the engine management system.
Ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
977 Posts
kwalls said:
Well getting her steam 'cleamed' or steam cleaned may save you a lot of elbow grease, but the possibility of damaging under hood electrical components will make up for any labor saved.

Personally I would not do this, while electronics are more reliable than before and those under the hood have a lot of resistance to water intrusion, that isn't the case when you apply steam.

IMO you only risk damaging any one of the numerous circuits that regulate operational parameters of the engine management system.
Ken
I don't buy the arguments people have of damaging electrical components by having an engine cleaned with something water based. There are people who spray their entire engine compartment with a decrease or citrus cleaner, liet it sit, and then house down the car with a garden hose. Steam cleaning is far less moisture then this.

If you have electrical connectors that have been torn open by you or something else, or your spraying water directly into an intake opening, then sure, you are running the risk of some big problems, but if you aren't being stupid, it's harmless.

Heck, I pesonally know people who used a pressure washer (and very low PSI setting) on their engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
JP 99300 said:
Hey Mark,

For the future, 303 Aerospace Protectant works great all around - rubber, vinyl, plastic, tires, etc. Gives it a very natural look - not a greasy shine. It is not always easy to find, but I have found it at boat/marine shops.

BTW, I took another great drive to Santa Barbara this past weekend and had Hwy 154 San Marcos Pass all to myself Sunday morning. What a great road when empty. We'll have to get the M5 group together again for a Bimmerfest reunion...
hey jim--

yeah, would love the reunion--are you going to the wente vineyard gig on the 9th?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,398 Posts
I've never had an electical/water problem that wasn't fixed by the sun.... in 29 years of hosing off many engines.

Probably just luck
 

·
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
·
2,977 Posts
Luck and a warm climate, I think.

"Simple Green" was mentioned earlier in this thread. I would definitely not use that stuff. If you read Louv´s thread about cleaning MAFs, someone posted Simple Green is too caustic (high pH value) to use on aluminium, and that it is known to destroy electronic connectors. The USAF has banned the stuff anywhere near aircraft.

David
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
10,456 Posts
i also give my engine the occasional spray down. No heavy pressure, a little degreaser where needed. No issues.

We were pretty aggressive with the pressure washer when i was an auto detailer while in college. We did the new bmw's for the local dealership, and they wanted all of the cosmoline off the engine/engine bay. Never had a no start issue, actually we did have one. We were doing an older 320i and the pressure washer blased the fues box cover off, and a number of fuses were scattered over the wash bay. (i didn't do this!..) Amusingly, i was in with the owner of the shop quitting at the time, my final consolation for them "i'll help you get this 320i running, then i'm out of here..." hiha hiha
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
I concur with our friend in Germany, though in the past I have been guilty of spraying down an engine with water, I think those days are gone. Water can sit in places you can not see and enter electical components- though the immediate impact may not be detected for some time. I'd play it safe and use the wet towel once a month or so. I experiment with vaccum attachements to get in the narrows which saves time in rubbing. Same for the cover on the hood- needs an occasional vacuuming. Just my neurosis.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,069 Posts
HDClown said:
There are people who spray their entire engine compartment with a decrease or citrus cleaner, liet it sit, and then house down the car with a garden hose. Steam cleaning is far less moisture then this.
Heck, I pesonally know people who used a pressure washer (and very low PSI setting) on their engines.
First, I would be less than truthful if I said I never used a water hose in the past under the hood and yes steam cleaning probably has less moisture with regard to volume, but steam vapor is far more penetrating and also more likely to accelerate the break down of any moisture proof coating used under the hood.
Likewise, I have used diluted household cleaning solutions to help in clean up under the hood, but again would state caution just has DavidS mentioned since these can leave residues that promote accelerated oxidation of some components under the hood.
However, the fact that someone else uses a garden hose to clean his Mopar / Ford / GM product without apparent harm does not mean I want to experiment with cleaning practices that might require a new BMW/MB/Porsche engine management system component because of water damage. After all, some of those components can be almost as costly an entire US produced engine.
Ken
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top