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Discussion Starter #1
I've seen from pics of the console around the SMG "stick" and the "EDC" button.

Is this "Electronic Differential Control" or is it "Electronic Damping Control"?

The reason I ask is that I remember hearing/reading about multiple settings for the differential, but I also thought the "D" in "EDC" might be Damping and thus be thus button for adjusting the suspension stiffness/roll.

If it D is for Differerential, what do the different settings do? Do they adjust the % of lockup of the Limited Slip Diff?...i.e. 25%, 40%, etc.? Are there 2 settings or 3?

If the D is for Diff, then how/where do you adjust the Suspension? In iDrive?

If the D is for Damping, then how/where do you adjust the Diff? In iDrive?

Of course, I guess I could wait 4 weeks to find out for myself but I thought I'd ask for the benefit of myself and others.

Thanks in advance.
 

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It is Damping and you cannot adjust the Diffiernetial. It "adjusts" itself. EDC can be adjusted by pressing the EDC button and it can alos be programmed into the M-Mode button.
 

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Gustav said:
It is Damping and you cannot adjust the Diffiernetial. It "adjusts" itself. EDC can be adjusted by pressing the EDC button and it can alos be programmed into the M-Mode button.
Gustav, thanks for the quick reply.

If I remember correctly, I think Jeremy Clarkson called it the Diff. control on Top Gear and I've continued to be confused ever since.

So, with it adjusting itself, is it simply self-adjusting the lock-up of the limited slip according to the car's slip angle, throttle position and a million other factors?
 

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It has the M Differential.

"Variable M differential lock.

Like the M3, the sportiest member of the family until now, the M5 features
a rear axle differential with variable, torque-sensing differential lock developed by the M GmbH. This M differential lock provides the vehicle with both
a high level of driving stability and optimum traction, especially when driving out of bends.

M differential lock for more driving fun and enhanced safety.

A differential lock produces locking power when required. This principle takes effect when one of the two driven wheels is about to spin – on a slippery surface for instance. Furthermore, the differential lock is well-appreciated by sports-minded drivers, as it helps enhance the positive qualities of rear-wheel drive when the vehicle is being driven in a sporty manner and on roads with an average to high coefficients of friction.

Providing excellent winter driving characteristics.

In the case of ‘standard’ torque-sensing differential locks, the overall transferable drive forces correspond to the forces the wheel with the lower coefficient of friction can convey. However, if the frictional coefficient
is very low, for example on snow, gravel or ice, the advantages in traction obtained by this conventional differential lock concept are limited.
The variable M differential lock is able to provide a substantial advantage in traction even in extremely demanding driving situations – for instance
when the driven wheels are subject to greatly varying coefficients of friction. Therefore, combined with the finely tuned DSC system and the well-balanced distribution of axle load, the variable M differential lock helps the M5 in delivering excellent winter driving characteristics.

Forward progress maintained in any situation.

A further advantage of the variable M differential lock is the fact that an increasing locking power is immediately generated as the differential speed between the driven wheels increases. This prevents the wheel – e.g. the
wheel nearest to the inside of a bend while driving over a pass at high speeds for instance – from losing drive forces. Forward progress is maintained
at all times.

100 percent locking power.

The variable M differential lock functions according to the following principle: the differential speed that builds up between the driven wheels when a driven wheel threatens to lose traction or runs on a very slippery surface immediately generates pressure in an integrated shear pump. This pressure is transferred to a multiple-disc clutch by means of a piston, by which drive forces are conveyed to the wheel with the better grip, according to the difference in wheel rotational speed. In extreme cases, the entire drive forces may be transmitted to the wheel with a better frictional coefficient. If the difference in rotational speed between the two wheels decreases, the pump pressure also inevitably decreases, with locking action diminishing accordingly. This self-regulating pump system is maintenance-free and filled with high viscosity silicone oil.
The driver benefits from the fact that he can drive off far better in his M5 on surfaces on which the drive wheels are provided with greatly varying frictional coefficients, as he then has more traction at his disposal. Moreover, the variable M differential lock also noticeably enhances handling and driving stability – an additional advantage in terms of safety and driving pleasure.
"


http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/showthread.php/?t=43542#threadsearch
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Gustav. Confused no more :)
 
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