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Composite is a mix of 2 materials.
Carbonfiber is a mix carbon and plastic. CFRP - Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic.

Carbon fiber in many lays in a plastic matrix.


For the brake discs there is a mix of carbon and ceramic.
There are 2 high temperature processes. 900 degrees for carbonation and 1700 degrees for siliconizing.

Sorry, my english is not good enough to explain this process.
 

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Your english sounds good enough for me!
 
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M5 Tracktool answered perfectly, here is just a little additional information since I am not sure what you are looking for as your question was a little more general....

most cars have composite brakes. You look at the pad and you can get metallic, semi-metallic, ceramic, etc. They essentially are the same materials, in different proportions. The rotors typically have a thin layer of steel around the surface, and lighter alloys inside in order to reduce rotating mass (which is absolutely critical to performance such as accelerating & braking, more so then weight, torque and horsepower). Some high-end cars have carbon ceramic brake rotors. These significantly reduce the rotating mass of the rotor, allow more consistent braking (less brake fade), require zero maintenance (per manufacturer's claims, they last the lifetime of the vehicle), and allow higher braking temperatures. The draw back is that they are very, very expensive. You will find them standard (or factory option) on Ferrari, Porsche, Aston Martin, and oddly enough Corvette ZR-1 to name a few. The last time I shopped at Porsche, the option to upgrade from Porsche 911 Turbo brakes to the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake rotors was $8800 (keep in mind that is an upgrade price + the cost of the traditional brakes). The brakes designed for the Nissan GT-R Spec V for example cost $50,000 for a set of 4. On the track, I have driven with ceramic rotors and the later day events after 5 or 6 races on a hot summer day... the car stops just as though it was the first time you touched the pedal. However the overwhelming majority of people use standard rotors because of the cost. I was looking for a set for our M6, but the only company I have seen that offered ceramic rotors was G-Power, and they never replied to my inquiry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just wanted to know if our machines have anything exotic fitted break system wise or simply standard system
 

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I just wanted to know if our machines have anything exotic fitted break system wise or simply standard system

Nothing special with the brake system of the M6.

Drilled disks 374x34 all around with monobloc calipers. Good enough for everyday driving, but not for the spirited driver.

Brembo has two upgrade solutions.

1) 380x32 drilled or slotted front disks with 8 piston floating calipers and 345x28 drilled or slotted rear disks with four piston calipers.

2) 405x34 drilled front disks with 6 piston lightweight floating calipers and 380x28 drilled rear didks with four piston calipers.

Hope this was of some help.

George
 

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@Gian124

Thank you.

I can look for your cermamic discs.
I have some good contacts in germany.

I know G-Power very good.

Zoran Zorneke from G-Power was living in my near.
He moved to the south from Germany.

The old G-Power company was in Brunsbüttel. 40minutes from my home.
Great! If they are reasonably priced, I'd love to upgrade.




George: do the 405mm require larger wheels? I have been told that the OEM rims are too small for Brembo's 405mm kit, but no one has ever confirmed first-hand.
 

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Great! If they are reasonably priced, I'd love to upgrade.




George: do the 405mm require larger wheels? I have been told that the OEM rims are too small for Brembo's 405mm kit, but no one has ever confirmed first-hand.
20" wheels ARE the minimum size.

Rotors only are 16" and if you see the 6 pot floating calipers, you will hold your breath.

Hope this helps.

George
 

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20" wheels ARE the minimum size.

Rotors only are 16" and if you see the 6 pot floating calipers, you will hold your breath.

Hope this helps.

George
Thank you George!
I have 6-pot chrome calipers on my track car... I've seen 12-piston Rotora chrome calipers, they look phenomenal, but are very little gain in performance


- Ian.


 
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