BMW M5 Forum and M6 Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it logical to assume that clutch wear will be related to the trasmission shift setting?

More > Less clutch wear
S6>S5>S4>S3>S2>S1
D5> > > > D1

Or is it just a matter of comfort?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,071 Posts
I think the rougher and quicker the clutch shifts, the less wear. The clutch is not "slipping for comfort". Of course, this theory is based on the same driving style. If you drive agressively all the time with the highest sport settings, and make more shifts, the clutch will wear out faster than if you drive normally using the "slush" mode. Driving normally using the highest sport setting should be the best clutch life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,356 Posts
Clutch wear is a function of the duration of slip and the amount of torque and speed put through while slipping. I bet that heat buildup from prior shifts greatly exacerbates this. LC is an extreme example where for a relatively long duration at the start you have slip, with a very high speed differential across the plates, and with maximum torque, and then followed by highest speed/torque shifts.

The higher SMG modes, while short in slip duration, have a high speed differential across the plates because they don't attempt to speed match, though the throttle-lift technique will mitigate this. Full throttle shifts in highest modes should produce signficant wear.

I suspect that least clutch wear occurs when launching slowly, and using mid-level SMG modes with throttle lift on shifts.

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks the methodology used by one of the top gear video segments seems the best.

S5-6 and a lighten off the throttle when upshifting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
There was an article in the german AMS (3/2005) about M5 settings. They took their fastest lap on a track with S4 and comfort if i remember correct. Maybe someone around here has the article. :M5launch:
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top