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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First off I take no responsibility if you hurt yourself or your car while doing this.

Difficulty: Very Easy


Symptoms: My clutch pedal was rubbing the side of the plastic trim piece under the dash. I noticed it after my Indy had replaced the clutch line. The panel can be adjusted some, but my mechanic said new pedal bushings would fix the issue entirely. Others have reported squeeking with there clutch pedal, but I think it's more common in other models like the E36.

After a little research I chose to go with the Rogue Engineering. Rogue precision CNC's these out of Delrin, which is a Dupont product. According to the DuPont website "combines lubricity and wear resistance with the stiffness and strength needed in parts designed to replace metal." In our case it's not replacing a metal part, but the mechanical and self-lubricating properties are welcome.

Tools:
Flat blade and Philips head screwdriver
Sandpaper

Parts:
Bushings - 35211158290 (or equivalent)
Circlip - 07119905695 (optional)

(#s reference the parts diagram from realoem)
1.) Remove the lower trim panel by removing four screws and turning the two thumb screws. Then disconnect the two connectors.

2.) Remove the circlip (#13) from the shaft connecting the spring to the pedal. Be careful not to lose it. Then remove the shaft (#12). the spring assembly will probably fall off. This is ok just put it aside. (Note: My car does not use #9 or #10, I doubt yours does either)

3.) Remove clips (#5) and shaft (#3)

4.) Grasp the pedal (#1) closest to the pivot and pull it off the shaft. This was fairly easy to do with the stock bushings as they are not as tight as the rogue bushings.

For Rogue Bushings Only

5.) This is a little bit tricky as I discovered the flange on the new Rogue bushings was too thick to fit the Clip (#5) on the outside of the pivot point. So some material would need to be removed for proper fit6.)ment. Take a measurement of the pedal width at the pivot point (including the old bushings) and mine was approximately 41.88 mm. I took several measurements of the flange of the old bushings and the new the old were anywhere from .053-.059" I believe so you need to at least get the new ones under .060" (using sandpaper or a lathe if you want to be overkill). We also took some sandpaper to the side of the clutch pedal (VERY LIGHT) because the pedal is a molded part and there is a seam that the old bushing sat inside that the new one sits on top of.

6.) Install the new bushings into the pedal and ensure the measurement is very close to the original.

7.) Reinstall in reverse order. Even though the bushings are self lubricating I took some WD40 and sprayed a little on my finger and rubbed on the pivot point shaft. This is because the Rogue Engineering bushings are machined to a very tight tolerance and made install of the pedal to the pivot point a little easier.

Impressions:
Worked like a charm. Also seems to improve clutch pedal feel (although that could all be in my head).
 

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Thanks for the DIY. What did the old bushes look like (e.g. deformed, cracked)?
FYI, there is a DIY prefix you can attached to the title (to the left of where you edit the title).
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I'll try and post pictures of the old bushings. They are cut pieces of plastic by design. To me the variation in the thickness of the flange measurements would indicate some deformation.
 

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Necroing this old post as it seems to be the main one that pops up during searching. I just did this on my 2000 M5 and it was HELLISHLY difficult! Mind you I'm an expert at working on cars, so my difficulties were not due to inexperience or poor technique. I just want to mention this for others considering this job, as it may or may not be as straight forward as it was for the OP. There is nothing wrong/additional with the original post, but for me there were additional difficulties I experienced, as follows:
- Pin 3 had some surface rust on it that made it extremely difficult to remove. I had to first get the clutch switch and bracket out of the way so that I could get a good grip on it with some big plies to work it loose and out (also required some penetrating oil). Clean up nicely with fine grit sandpaper and went back together no problem at least once I was able to get it removed.
- New Rogue bushings were indeed oversized, both in flange thickness and outer diameter. The ID was good and they would slide on the shaft nicely, but the fit into the clutch pedal was so tight that the pressure would slightly deform them to the point that they would no longer slide on over the shaft. I needed to carefully sand down the OD to the point that they would fit snugly but not over-tightly into the pedal before I could get the assembly back on the shaft. Granted this could have been an issue with the ID of my clutch pedal as easily as the OD of the bushings. In the end, I got good 'fits' on both bushings individually, but at that point the concentricity was off enough that I still couldn't get the pedal re-installed with both bushings in there. In the end, I just used the new bushing on the inboard side and re-used the old stock bushing on the outboard side. (I did the same thing for the brake pedal with the second new bushing, as it also had some play). This still worked wonderfully for reducing the pedal slop, and proved reasonable to re-assemble, as opposed to almost impossible. Throughout all this, I ended up removing part of the lower dash and the EWS module in order to gain some extra space to work.
- Finally, the spring assembly of shaft #8 and spring #9 or 10 take some real force to compress far enough in order to get it re-engaged to the clutch pedal. I was able to accomplish this with my good sized channel-lock pliers, but if I hadn't had those I'm not sure how I would have managed it.

So in the end I was able to dis- and re-assemble everything, and the problem of slop has been addressed even with only using the new bushing on one side, but I probably spent around 4 hours total on the job and had to remove ~50% more parts that strictly necessary in order to gain the extra access I needed for leverage.
 
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