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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is a write up on replacing the clutch and all of the shifter bushings on a 2002 BMW e39 M5. This writeup does not cover replacing the rear main seal or the flywheel because they just were not needed. The writeup will show a lot of the tools used but no torques because honestly, we didn't use a torque wrench on any of it.

At this point the car is 12 years old and has 81,000 miles on it. It has only seen one winter and has always been garage kept.

It should be noted the Russian translated BMW TIS instructions are very good if you get stuck and can be found here:
http://translate.google.ca/translate...ed=0CFYQ7gEwAw


First order of business, acquire a friend with an uncle that has a two post lift in a nice barn fully stocked with tools. I just happened to have one of those:



Remove both under body plastic panels. The large rear one comes undone with Philips head 1/4 turn screws, the front one comes undone with the Philips head 1/4 turn screws and two 10mm hex head bolts.



It is now time to bask in the glory that is the underside of an e39 M5.



Assuming your exhaust headers are cool enough the first thing you should do is spray a good amount of PB Blaster on the bolts that connect the header to the rest of the exhaust system. On a stock system this will include 4 nuts on the outer pipes and 4 bolts on the inner pipes.


While you are at it, PB Blast all other bolts you find connected to the exhaust system and the O2 sensors. After that is done it is time to take a break and go to dinner.
This photo is sponsored by PB-Blaster


After coming back from dinner, take a good look at the underside of the car you might just find something else that needs attention. For instance I found a broken rear sway bar mount bracket. :sad2:


Now comes the hardest part of the entire job, dropping the stock one piece exhaust system. It is said that removing the rear bumper makes this much easier. We decided to remove the bolt going through the center of the rubber exhaust hanger on each outside of the exhaust. This was a mistake, after inspection the two nuts on studs that hold the other part of the rubber exhaust hanger should have been removed, they are easier. If you are interested in taking this bolt out, a 13mm wrench will do:


The O2 sensors need to be removed. It would be best to find somewhere to find someway to tie them up else your face will get black marks all over it from bumping into them. Wrench size is unknown, I used an adjustable wrench, they came out with surprising ease.


Remove the 4 bolts an 2 nuts that hold on the central exhaust hanger plate. Both the bolts and nuts are 13mm.


Remove the 8 nuts from the studs that hold both sets of inner exhaust hangers on. These are right next to the battery box and are easily reached with a 13mm socket with an extension.


A two foot extension works well:


When you drop the exhaust it helps to have at least 3 to 5 people on hand, it is very heavy. It may also help to tie a strap across your lift to help catch the exhaust.


Unclip the O2 sensor wires from the center heat shield shields. Only the post cat O2 sensors are clipped up.


Now it is time to take off the heat shields that cover the drive line, there are two of them. All of the bolts are either 8mm or 10mm hex head.


Unclip the O2 sensor wires from the back of the transmission support bracket.


Unclip O2 sensor wires from wire clip on back of transmission.


Unclip O2 sensor wires from the passenger side of the transmission. There are 3 clips, 2 are visible in the photo below.


Unplug this connector from bottom passenger side of transmission.


Remove these two connectors from drivers side of transmission.


The only way to unbolt the prop shaft at the guibo is to remove the rear trans mount. So the lift the car is on was lowered to about 3 ft off the ground so that a transmission jack could be used to hold the transmission. Now the rear transmission mount can be unbolted. All of the bolts and nuts on the mount are 13mm.


Transmission being supported by a jack under a cinder block under a 2x4. Seems safe. hiha


With the rear transmission support out of the way the guibo bolts are easily accessible. Both the nut and bolt are 21mm. You can remove the 3 bolts connected to the transmission or the 3 connected to the drive shaft. I decided to remove the ones on the transmission as there was more room for the wrench on them. For this it helps to rotate the shaft and then pull the hand break to lock the shaft from rotating.


Remove the prop shaft carrier bearing. The nuts are 13mm, there is some sticky glue holding it in too.


Strap the prop shaft up and out of the way. The goal is to prevent the rear CV joint on the differential from resting at it's max angle. If you just let the prop shaft drop you run the risk of ruining the boot on the rear CV joint.


Switching to the interior, pull up all of the boots and foam around the stick shift, unplug the wire for the stick light and get it all out of the way so that you can access the ball.


The liner around the ball was a royal pain to get out. I don't have any good tips other then to destroy the two clips that hold the liner in and then have someone from down below hammer up on the shifter assembly while you pull. It wasn't a great method but it did work. The liner snaps into the two slots in the shifter carrier.


The bonded rubber mount on the back of the shifter carrier was difficult to remove, we used needle nose vise grips. There are probably better ways in hindsight, like squeezing it. If my memory serves me right, this is known as part # 14 in the Real OEM drawings. It looks like I did not take a pic of removing the clip on the shifter linkage.


Normally it is suggested to support the engine by the oil pan with a floor jack so that it will not rest on and destroy parts of the steering. We found a much simpler and better solution that does not get in the way. Lift up the engine by the trans ever so slightly and then slip a few small pieces of 2x4 under the engine above the frame. Please see the pic below for reference of location.


To remove the shifter carrier, rotate the clip up and pull the pin out to the right.


Take off the two 13mm bolts that hold on the exhaust hanger bracket on the back of the transmission.


Removing the salve cylinder take off the two 13mm nuts that hold it to the transmission.


Now removing the transmission. There are 12 bolts around the bell housing. The top two are torx e11 and the bottom ten are torx e12. A various set of long extensions and universal joints will be helpful.


While you have the exhaust system off it is easy to clean the tips. CRC brakcleen does an excellent job at bringing out the best of the stainless exhaust tips


All clean! :)


The bushings on the shifter carrier come out nicely with a socket and a press. They go in well with a vise. Lubricating them will help them go in easier, I used some hand sanitizer that evaporated quickly.


To keep the slave cylinder out of the way, one of the loops in the steel line fits nicely in the tip of the one exhaust header. This is a good place to put it to keep it out of harms way when removing and installing the transmission.


Removing the clutch involves removing six 5mm socket head cap screws.


New clutch, old clutch!


A slide hammer works quite well for removing the pilot bearing.




More write up is to come.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Good lord... someone actually did this the proper way and dropped the exhaust? :eek:
Indeed. We are trying to keep the car as stock as possible, hence the stock exhaust system.



Apparently you can't edit a post multiple days in, I will continue from here:

The flywheel looked pretty good, there were some heat spots but it still had grooves in it so it was decided that running out and rushing to get a flywheel was unneeded.


New rear transmission mounts are easy, unbolt the 13mm hex and replace with the new part. Shown are the new mounts, they are supposed to be the same stiffness as the stock mounts but they look quite different.


The shifter link coupling instals quite easily, just put some grease on the ball, push on the new bushing, slide in the new pin and slide the snap ring into the groove.


The shifter link slides into the new bushing and a clip is installed. My new shifter link, part of the ESC tuning stock shifter refresh kit came with a slightly upgraded shifter link coupling that does not need the yellow washers like the original one. The new clips are difficult to push on.


Replacing the throwout bearing is as easy as grabbing the original one and pulling it off the shaft then sliding the new one in its place. If it were any easier the bearing would install itself.


To drain the transmission fluid, unscrew the plug circled in blue. To refill, fill by the plug on the drivers side of the transmission. Be careful that the transmission is not laying to far upside down, there is a breather on the top and fluid will drain out of it! :eek: I discovered this and quickly propped the top of the transmission up a bit. The trans takes 1.75 quarts of 75W80 GL-4 gear oil, at least that is BAV Auto claims. I bought two quarts of Red Line MTL.


Installing the new pilot bearing I used a small hammer and a 22mm impact socket. It fit perfectly and went in easily. BMW chamfered the hole just perfectly for installation.


To remove the seals on the center exhaust headers I chiseled a grove into them with a hammer and a screw driver until I could just break them off.



Now to installing the new clutch!!!

Make sure the metal clutch contact surfaces are very clean, CRC Brakleen and some paper towels works well for this. Clutch components typically come with some oil on them to prevent them from rusting make sure you clean this off!


Install new clutch friction disk with alignment tool, the ECS tuning clutch kit I purchased came with the correct tool to fit underneath SAC locking plate.


Install the new clutch using the six original socket head cap screws with 5mm Allen key heads.


I forgot to remove the installation bolt from the clutch pad center tool, so I placed an Allen key into the clutch to prevent it from rotating and backed out the socket head cap screw. This one happened to be an English 1/4-20 with a 3/16 Allen key head.


Remove the SAC locking plate. This is heavily spring loaded, be careful! The one I had used a 14mm Allen key to drive it and turned counter clock wise.


The new clutch is now installed!! :checkeredflag:
The installation procedure of all other components is the reverse of installing them. Good luck, it should look similar to this when done:



Primary tools used for this job include:
Assorted 13mm wrenches and sockets
10mm and 8mm nut drivers
Metric Allen Keys
Torx e11 and e12 sockets
Phillips Head screw driver
Flat Head screwdrivers for prying
PB-Blaster
CRC Brakleen
Labeled Zip Lock bags for all bolts and components that came off the car
Hammers
Pliers of various sorts
Lots of rags and paper towels

Items I purchased for this job:
ECS tuning clutch kit: BMW E39 M5 S62 5.0L Drivetrain Clutch - 21217515146 - Clutch Kit - ES#2602681
ECS tuning shifter rebuild kit: BMW E39 M5 S62 5.0L Drivetrain Shifter - 25111222375KT - Shifter Rebuild Kit - ES#2593567
Red Line MTL fluid from Bavarian Autosport
 

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Cool! What a clean car underneath!

Couple notes from my experience:

I unbolted the exhaust hanger itself from the trans (two bolts) and left that attached to the exhaust. Saves removing a couple bolts.

02 sensors can merely be unplugged.

Trans brace can stay attached to the trans the whole time, doesn't need to come off to remove the DS. In fact it's a great leverage area for a box end wrench to rest against while tightening/loosening.

You should put a dab of grease on the two contact points of the TO bearing where it touches the clutch fork.

TO Bearing guide tube should be inspected for wear, trans input seal should be inspected for leakage.

Trans input splines should be very lightly greased. Very lightly.

Turning the steering wheel one way or the other (can't remember) lowers the center link quite a bit, allows for you to drop the trans/motor combo pretty far.

I used two pieces of 3/4" oak flooring as my oil-pan-to-subframe spacer. This was put in before unbolting the trans brace from the chassis and lowering the trans/motor combo down early on.

Exhaust tapered donut seals are reusable.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Cool! What a clean car underneath!

Couple notes from my experience:

I unbolted the exhaust hanger itself from the trans (two bolts) and left that attached to the exhaust. Saves removing a couple bolts.

02 sensors can merely be unplugged.

Trans brace can stay attached to the trans the whole time, doesn't need to come off to remove the DS. In fact it's a great leverage area for a box end wrench to rest against while tightening/loosening.

You should put a dab of grease on the two contact points of the TO bearing where it touches the clutch fork.

TO Bearing guide tube should be inspected for wear, trans input seal should be inspected for leakage.

Trans input splines should be very lightly greased. Very lightly.

Turning the steering wheel one way or the other (can't remember) lowers the center link quite a bit, allows for you to drop the trans/motor combo pretty far.

I used two pieces of 3/4" oak flooring as my oil-pan-to-subframe spacer. This was put in before unbolting the trans brace from the chassis and lowering the trans/motor combo down early on.

Exhaust tapered donut seals are reusable.
Thanks for the insight!

WE did quite a few of those things but not all of them.

For some reason I didn't even think to look at the connectors on the O2 sensors, I just unbolted them.

I did put some grease on the transmission spline shaft, the grease came with the clutch kit.

The clutch kit I purchased came with new tapered exhaust doughnut seals hence I replaced them. It also came with new bolts and nuts for the exhaust.


Those transmission mounts look weird compared to my OE ones. Were yours BMW OE or aftermarket?
I don't think the ones I bought were OE but they are supposed to match the stiffness. Here is a pic of my original one vs. the new one, the originals were actually in great condition. In the photo I am holding the original mount and the new one is the hex shaped one on the floor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
During the experience we had a GoPro camera set up to take a photo every 10 seconds, here is the video of compiled photos.
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zahsBbwxQNg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

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Excellent write up.
I think I need to get my clutch done at some point...likely after summer as it slips at redline with fast shifts.
I can smell it and when it slips and gets hot...even backing down the revs make it slip for a second.
As long as I don't shift redline with speed strokes...it does fine.

What clutch would you recommend and how would OE compare to a hi-po clutch that can take abuse (stock HP/TQ)?
 

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Just had a question--is the shifting a little smoother? I was surprised how much easier it was to shift they changed out my bushings...excellent write up and pics by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Excellent write up.
I think I need to get my clutch done at some point...likely after summer as it slips at redline with fast shifts.
I can smell it and when it slips and gets hot...even backing down the revs make it slip for a second.
As long as I don't shift redline with speed strokes...it does fine.

What clutch would you recommend and how would OE compare to a hi-po clutch that can take abuse (stock HP/TQ)?
I replaced mine with an OE clutch, mainly since I am trying to bring the car back up to original like new condition while keeping it stock. I can say that the new clutch engages much better then my old one and can put a lot more power to the ground. I had a similar problem to yours, if I had too much power on or too many rpms for the given gear and road speed selection, the clutch would slip bad. It was most noticeable on the 2nd to 3rd shift.

I have no experience with hi-po upgraded clutches, this is the first manual car I have owned and the most powerful ones I have driven by over 200 hp.

Just had a question--is the shifting a little smoother? I was surprised how much easier it was to shift they changed out my bushings...excellent write up and pics by the way.
Shifting is slightly smoother, the gears are easier to find due to them being better defined. The shifter is super stiff now and I am hoping it wears in a bit. Also I am kind of missing the extra 3/4" of throw I had from the slop, I guess I kind of liked the long throw. The bushings definitely improved feel I am just not used to it yet.

Thanks for the compliment! :)
 

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Can you elaborate on the grooves in the flywheel? My car has a little over 200k and I'm still debating on replacing it or not
 

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Can you elaborate on the grooves in the flywheel? My car has a little over 200k and I'm still debating on replacing it or not
Well, this was coming from the old Muscle car guy (my friend's dad) that helped us some with the clutch job. He said that there were still machining groves on the face of the flywheel which means the face was not really worn down. If I compared it to the machining on the clutch plate on the other side of the pads, the flywheel had grooves left in it that were probably half the height as the new ones. This is all very subjective but I will say that it works very nicely and does not slip in the condition that it is in. Granted my flywheel on has 81,000 miles on it. If your flywheel has 200k on it I would replace it regardless, it probably looks like a nice glazed over heat spotted mess.

You can see the condition of the groves in my flywheel in the pic below. It works just fine.
 
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