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I loved early pics of the spy shot pics of the M5 with alloy wheels painted black. Does anyone know any company who can do this professionally [in the uk] by painting the standard silver alloys into the black ones.

Has anyone done this and are what is the quality like afterwards [or problems] ?

Thanks.

360bhp
??????
 

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Any good paint shop that can provide powder coating should be able to help you. Here is the process taken from the Andrews Powder Coating web site in CA. I'm sure there are similar facilities in the UK. Good Luck

1. Preparation: Depending on the base material (substrate), we will carefully clean off any pre-existing powder coated or painted surface by chemical stripping or utilizing sandblast media ranging from mild to aggressive granulations, or using glass beads for other color effects. (what does sandblasting do, and what is glass beading?) During this process, all rust and metal corrosion is removed so that when your piece is finished, it is better than brand new!

If the part you bring to us is already powder coated, we will take every step to avoid sandblasting to remove the existing finish, and instead suggest that the piece be chemically stripped of the coating. The reason for this is that IF the piece was properly prepared and sandblasted the first time it was powder coated, the coating should be so difficult to remove that your part could potentially be ruined in the removal process. Properly applied powder coating finishes SHOULD NOT be able to be sandblasted off easily!
What if my parts are chrome plated?

2. Pre-Baking: Next, the parts get pre-baked. We feel that pre-baking parts is one of the characteristics of a high quality coater. The pre-baking temperature is approximately 20 degrees hotter than the actual powder coating baking temperature. This process bakes out any impurities that may be lurking within the pores of the metal (a process called ‘outgassing’). If these impurities are not pre-baked out, they can, and will, bubble up and out during the final curing process, causing unsightly blemishes in your powder coated finish! Bubbling up can further make it probable that your powder will start to chip and cause entire sections of coating to fall off.

3. Polishing: If you have parts that require some of the surfaces to be polished during the finishing process, we will give them a solvent bath and another pre bake to remove any of the fingerprints your parts may have accumulated during polishing.

4. Masking: Masking is followed by an additional chemical cleaning “wipe down” step, removing finger prints or debris that may have gotten onto your parts.

5. Powder Application: Next, the masked parts make their way to the powder booth where they are hung on electrically grounded racks. The powder is given a 30K-90K volt charge, and using a special electrostatic spray gun, the powder is sprayed onto the part where it adheres to the material, much like the way dust clings to a tv screen. This process applies the powder in a smooth and even coating.
At this stage, the powder is still just that- powder- and can be completely blown off by an air hose or wiped off with your finger!

6. Oven Curing: Once coated, the racked parts are rolled into one of our two convection style ovens. Powder coating experience has our entire staff fine tuned to proper curing times and techniques. Different sizes of parts, different metals and even substrate thicknesses and powder composition dictate the temperatures and time your piece(s) spend in the oven!
Remember, the metal of your individual part must become hot enough to melt the powder at its’ proper cure statistic for optimum adhesion!
 

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AbruzziBoy said:
Any good paint shop that can provide powder coating should be able to help you. Here is the process taken from the Andrews Powder Coating web site in CA. I'm sure there are similar facilities in the UK. Good Luck

1. Preparation: Depending on the base material (substrate), we will carefully clean off any pre-existing powder coated or painted surface by chemical stripping or utilizing sandblast media ranging from mild to aggressive granulations, or using glass beads for other color effects. (what does sandblasting do, and what is glass beading?) During this process, all rust and metal corrosion is removed so that when your piece is finished, it is better than brand new!

If the part you bring to us is already powder coated, we will take every step to avoid sandblasting to remove the existing finish, and instead suggest that the piece be chemically stripped of the coating. The reason for this is that IF the piece was properly prepared and sandblasted the first time it was powder coated, the coating should be so difficult to remove that your part could potentially be ruined in the removal process. Properly applied powder coating finishes SHOULD NOT be able to be sandblasted off easily!
What if my parts are chrome plated?

2. Pre-Baking: Next, the parts get pre-baked. We feel that pre-baking parts is one of the characteristics of a high quality coater. The pre-baking temperature is approximately 20 degrees hotter than the actual powder coating baking temperature. This process bakes out any impurities that may be lurking within the pores of the metal (a process called ‘outgassing’). If these impurities are not pre-baked out, they can, and will, bubble up and out during the final curing process, causing unsightly blemishes in your powder coated finish! Bubbling up can further make it probable that your powder will start to chip and cause entire sections of coating to fall off.

3. Polishing: If you have parts that require some of the surfaces to be polished during the finishing process, we will give them a solvent bath and another pre bake to remove any of the fingerprints your parts may have accumulated during polishing.

4. Masking: Masking is followed by an additional chemical cleaning “wipe down” step, removing finger prints or debris that may have gotten onto your parts.

5. Powder Application: Next, the masked parts make their way to the powder booth where they are hung on electrically grounded racks. The powder is given a 30K-90K volt charge, and using a special electrostatic spray gun, the powder is sprayed onto the part where it adheres to the material, much like the way dust clings to a tv screen. This process applies the powder in a smooth and even coating.
At this stage, the powder is still just that- powder- and can be completely blown off by an air hose or wiped off with your finger!

6. Oven Curing: Once coated, the racked parts are rolled into one of our two convection style ovens. Powder coating experience has our entire staff fine tuned to proper curing times and techniques. Different sizes of parts, different metals and even substrate thicknesses and powder composition dictate the temperatures and time your piece(s) spend in the oven!
Remember, the metal of your individual part must become hot enough to melt the powder at its’ proper cure statistic for optimum adhesion!
We do powder coating at one of my companies (not wheels). This sounds like they really know what they're doing.
 

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AbruzziBoy said:
Any good paint shop that can provide powder coating should be able to help you. Here is the process taken from the Andrews Powder Coating web site in CA. I'm sure there are similar facilities in the UK. Good Luck

1. Preparation: Depending on the base material (substrate), we will carefully clean off any pre-existing powder coated or painted surface by chemical stripping or utilizing sandblast media ranging from mild to aggressive granulations, or using glass beads for other color effects. (what does sandblasting do, and what is glass beading?) During this process, all rust and metal corrosion is removed so that when your piece is finished, it is better than brand new!

If the part you bring to us is already powder coated, we will take every step to avoid sandblasting to remove the existing finish, and instead suggest that the piece be chemically stripped of the coating. The reason for this is that IF the piece was properly prepared and sandblasted the first time it was powder coated, the coating should be so difficult to remove that your part could potentially be ruined in the removal process. Properly applied powder coating finishes SHOULD NOT be able to be sandblasted off easily!
What if my parts are chrome plated?

2. Pre-Baking: Next, the parts get pre-baked. We feel that pre-baking parts is one of the characteristics of a high quality coater. The pre-baking temperature is approximately 20 degrees hotter than the actual powder coating baking temperature. This process bakes out any impurities that may be lurking within the pores of the metal (a process called ‘outgassing’). If these impurities are not pre-baked out, they can, and will, bubble up and out during the final curing process, causing unsightly blemishes in your powder coated finish! Bubbling up can further make it probable that your powder will start to chip and cause entire sections of coating to fall off.

3. Polishing: If you have parts that require some of the surfaces to be polished during the finishing process, we will give them a solvent bath and another pre bake to remove any of the fingerprints your parts may have accumulated during polishing.

4. Masking: Masking is followed by an additional chemical cleaning “wipe down” step, removing finger prints or debris that may have gotten onto your parts.

5. Powder Application: Next, the masked parts make their way to the powder booth where they are hung on electrically grounded racks. The powder is given a 30K-90K volt charge, and using a special electrostatic spray gun, the powder is sprayed onto the part where it adheres to the material, much like the way dust clings to a tv screen. This process applies the powder in a smooth and even coating.
At this stage, the powder is still just that- powder- and can be completely blown off by an air hose or wiped off with your finger!

6. Oven Curing: Once coated, the racked parts are rolled into one of our two convection style ovens. Powder coating experience has our entire staff fine tuned to proper curing times and techniques. Different sizes of parts, different metals and even substrate thicknesses and powder composition dictate the temperatures and time your piece(s) spend in the oven!
Remember, the metal of your individual part must become hot enough to melt the powder at its’ proper cure statistic for optimum adhesion!
Thank you for the post you guys! We really strive to be the best this country has to offer. We are the oldest custom powder coating facility in the USA, and our quality, we have found, is second to none.

We are BMW freaks here too; we did a seminar at the Tech Fest 2003 in California. We have a Titanium Silver 330ci and a 2001 BMW R1100S and a 2005 BMW K1200S Sport Bikes!

Have a great day! :cheers:

Sandee Andrews
Andrews Powder Coating, Inc.
[email protected]
 

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Any input on black chrome plating an existing wheel? I'd like to go that route versus standard black powder coating.
 

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t10001 said:
Any input on black chrome plating an existing wheel? I'd like to go that route versus standard black powder coating.
Black chrome is a beautiful finish. Please research who will do your plating for you. EPA has cracked down pretty hard on us Californians, so instead of the 12 step process that chrome plating should be, it is now only a 7 step process.

We have sent all of our show piece chrome plating to a place in Paducah, Kentucky called Browns Plating. They do the most beautiful chrome plating I have ever seen in my life.

We do have a powder here called 'black chrome'. It looks AWESOME over polished aluminum or standard chrome. We have done many wheels this color; there is a Prowler and a Mini Cooper on our site with this color if you would like to see what it looks like.

Kindest regards,

Sandee Andrews
 

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Thank you for the tips. I have another month or two to decide what I want to do, but I'll keep both of those options in mind. :biggrinbounce:
 

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t10001 said:
Thank you for the tips. I have another month or two to decide what I want to do, but I'll keep both of those options in mind. :biggrinbounce:
t10001-

I think my pictures are still up. If so, take a look as I had the wheels powdercoated in Black Chrome. It was a little darker than I anticipated so make sure you see it in person first.

KCD
 
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